REINVENTING RITUAL: Opens at the Contemporary Jewish Museum, April 22nd

Contemporary Art and Design for Jewish Life
Exhibit looks at a modern hybrid of the prescribed and the personal as contemporary artists tailor Judaic rituals to their own values, identities, and needs.

sean-martinfield-2-2.jpg
Seán Martinfield
Sentinel Editor and Publisher
Photo by Lynn Imanaka

Rituals are embedded in everyday life, whether established by religion, culture, or family, and are continuously performed and reinvented by each generation. Rituals are personal, and are often created and re-interpreted to provide meaning and sustenance for a fulfilling life. A new exhibition at the Contemporary Jewish Museum (CJM) examines a modern hybrid of the prescribed and the personal as 58 contemporary artists tailor Judaic rituals to their own values, identities, and lifestyles. Reinventing Ritual: Contemporary Art and Design for Jewish Life , on view April 22nd – October 3rd, 2010, is the first international exhibition to explore how artists and designers are transforming traditional practices into opportunities for contemplation and critique. It reflects a growing movement of artists and individuals engaged in ritual innovation and the explosion of new Jewish ritual, art, and objects since the 1990s – a time that has seen the practice of Judaism revolutionized by feminism, environmentalism, and more.

utopia-menorah
UTOPIA MENORAH, 2006. Jonathan Adler.
High-fired brown stoneware with white glaze.

Featured in the exhibition are nearly 60 innovative works in diverse media including installation art, video, drawing, metalwork, jewelry, ceramics, comics, sculpture, textiles, industrial design and architecture created between 1999 and 2009 by leading and emerging artists from America, Israel, and beyond. Notable artists include Oreet Ashery, Jonathan Adler, Helène Aylon, Deborah Grant, Sigalit Landau, Virgil Marti, Mierle Laderman Ukeles, Karim Rashid, Galya Rosenfeld, Lella Vignelli, and Allan Wexler. Reinventing Ritual: Contemporary Art and Design for Jewish Life was organized by The Jewish Museum in New York City. Nearly half of the works on view are from its collection. The show also compliments and builds on the CJM’s longstanding engagement with living artists to examine Jewish material culture and heritage, particularly through its acclaimed Invitational series that asks artists of diverse backgrounds to create new interpretations of Judaica. Past shows have spotlighted individual objects such as seder plates, besamim or spice boxes, kiddush cups, and more. “The Museum has really been at the forefront of thinking about ritual objects and their contemporary significance,” says Connie Wolf, Executive Director of the CJM. “Reinventing Ritual builds on what we’ve created – looking across the spectrum at traditional objects and rites and bringing in both new and familiar artists to think in fresh ways about the role of ritual in our everyday lives.”

fringed-garment
Fringed Garment, 2005. Rachel Kanter.
Cotton fabric, cotton thread, cotton floss, fusible webbing.

The works on view interpret Judaism as a living, changing experience, rather than one fixed in text or custom. To that end, they are arranged in four thematic nodes: Thinking, Covering, Absorbing, and Building. These themes focus on ritual as physical action related to specific acts such as eating, drinking, counting, smelling, lighting candles, and praying, essentially grounding them in things shared by all people – food, clothes, the environment. Many of them can be viewed through the prism of social phenomena as well – feminism for example being one of the greatest sources of new ritual practices. With Fringed Garment (2005), American fiber artist Rachel Kanter pushes the boundaries of traditional sex roles by combining a kitchen apron and a prayer shawl (until recently worn only by Jewish men) in a more practical form designed for a woman. Kanter writes, “If I wanted to wear a tallit, it should be made for me and speak of my experiences as a spiritual Jew, a woman and a mother.”

A sculptural installation by past CJM Invitational artist Helène Aylon, All Rise (2007), addresses the patriarchal tradition that allows three males to pass judgment in the Jewish Court but forbids women to judge. Aylon’s installation is an egalitarian vision of the future: a courtroom that administers feminist halakha (Jewish law). “I think of my work as a ‘rescue’ of the Earth and G–d and Women—all stuck in patriarchal designations,” writes Helène Aylon.

hevruta-mituta
Hevruta-Mituta, 2007. Hadas Kruk and Anat Stein, Studio Armadillo.
Plastic chess board, thirty-two knitted skullcaps.

Studio Armadillo, the Israeli artist team of Hadas Kruk and Anat Stein, created Hevruta-Mituta in 2007. Comprised of thirty-two skullcaps on a white, plastic chessboard, this work derives from a conceptual and visual analogy between hevruta (learning in small groups) and chess competitions. The skullcaps, knit by girls during lessons in religious school, are colorful emblems of women’s increasing access to traditionally male-dominated Orthodox Jewish education and ritual.

Additionally, a potent source of recent ritual exploration centers on gender transition. A video installation entitled Opshernish (2000/2009) by Canadian transgender artist Tobaron Waxman turns the ritual practice of opsherin, a first haircut that initiates three-year-old boys into religious observance and study, into a personal act of agency—causing the viewer to ask what creates gender and how. Works that redesign ritual objects with a modern eco ethos are also prevalent in the exhibition. In many cases this takes the form of repurposing cast off or industrial materials. Local San Francisco engineer and inventor Joe Grand contributed Galvanized Steel Candelabra (2003), a menorah made from steel pipe fittings. Israeli artists Jonathan Hopp and Sarah Auslander use ceramic decals to turn dishes purchased at the Jaffa flea market into traditional Passover plates.

gardening-sukkah-with-open-roof
Gardening Sukkah, 2000. Allan Wexler.
Wood, gardening implements, eating utensils.

gardening-sukkah-interior
Gardening Sukkah, interior

Past CJM Invitational artist Allan Wexler’s Gardening Sukkah (2000) – complete with retractable roof, gardening tools, Jewish ritual objects, and dining utensils – embodies a perpetual cycle of renewal, moving between uses without ever lying fallow. “For seven days,” he writes, “Gardening Sukkah shelters the family as they gather for Sukkot meals. For the remaining 358 days it functions as an outbuilding for gardening activities and storage.”

Although contemporary values and isms surface in many of the works, many also emphasize craft and enhance existing ritual through attention to materials. Israeli artist Bruria Avidan’s Wedding Cup (2004) elegantly blends ritual function and form. The couple unites the two halves of a silver cup, made watertight with a silicone edge and rubber binders. “It concretizes the main idea of Jewish marriage, binding two who come together to form a single whole,” she writes.

wedding-cups
Wedding Cup, 2004. Bruria Avidan. Silver, silicone, rubber.

Also on View
The exhibition also includes resource area that provides information about traditional and contemporary Jewish ritual and includes listening stations of music associated with ritual. The music stations will include playlists based on various Jewish and vernacular rituals with songs chosen by local artists, musicians, and figureheads. Music provides an additional point of access to thinking about ritual and its reinvention.
Several works in the exhibition also have an accompanying video-label that provides further insight into the process, ritual, and concept behind these works. These video-labels are portions of a commissioned video featuring commentary by rabbis, artists and the exhibition’s curator. The excerpts provide insight into the show’s themes and an explanation of the highly symbolic rituals of Judaism and more.
The exhibition is also designed to invite visitors to consider their own rituals and create dialogue through a series of questions asked through the exhibition like: What are the rituals that you perform as you wake up in the morning? Are rituals different from a habit or routine? What do you remember about rituals you participated in as a child? Have you continued or modified those rituals for your family? Do you have a sacred space in your home? How did you make it sacred? Visitors will have the opportunity to participate in the exhibition by writing their response to these questions, on a “ritual board” in the gallery and online.

galvanized-steel-candelabra
Galvanized Steel Candelabra, 2003. Joe Grand. Steel pipe fittings.

Click here for more information on the exhibit and to order tickets on-line:
Reinventing Ritual: Contemporary Art and Design for Jewish Life

The Exhibition Catalogue

reinventing-ritual


The 152-page accompanying catalogue, published by The Jewish Museum and Yale University Press, contains 103 illustrations and will be available for $39.95 in the CJM’s gift shop.

* * * * * *

Visit Seán on YouTube:
”As Time Goes By” – aboard Cunard’s Queen Victoria
Lorena Feijóo – A Look at “Giselle” with Seán Martinfield
“Embraceable You” – On The Organ – At the Legion of Honor
Samson vs. Dalilah at AT&T Ballpark
DALILAH – In residence at San Francisco’s de Young Museum

See related articles and interviews:
CHARLIE CHAPLIN – 1925 Silent Classic Tonight at Davies Symphony Hall
AMANDA McBROOM – A rose for new CD, “CHANSON”
PROGRAM 6 – Beauty In Abundance At San Francisco Ballet
CAMERON CARPENTER – Stellar Organist Returns to San Francisco May 2nd
DUNCAN SHIEK – And the SF Symphony
HANDEL’S “ORLANDO” – An Interview with Conductor Nicholas McGagen
MASTERPIECES FROM THE MUSÉE D’ORSAY – Coming to the de Young Museum
CITY ISLAND – Thumbs Up for Andy Garcia
OLYMPIA DUKAKIS – Opens in A.C.T.’s “Vigil”
WORLD PREMIERE – Alonzo King LINES Ballet, 4/16–25
WAKING SLEEPING BEAUTY – An Interview with Director Don Hahn and Producer Peter Schneider
CAMERON CARPENTER – At Davies Symphony Hall, May 2nd
IVETA APKALNA – Organist Debuts at Davies Symphony Hall
BLACK & WHITE BALL – Tony Bennett and k.d. lang, May 22nd
THE LITTLE MERMAID – “This Girl’s Got Everything!”
SWITCHBOARD MUSIC FESTIVAL 2010 – Sunday, March 28th
THE SUGAR WITCH – A Winner At New Conservatory Theatre Center
USS POTOMAC – A Pleasure Cruise on a Presidential Yacht
PEARLS OVER SHANGHAI – An Interview with Russell Blackwood
ALICE IN WONDERLAND – A Lot of Tempest in a Pot of Tea
PROGRAM 4 – Tonight at San Francisco Ballet
ROMAN POLANSKI – “The Ghost Writer”
CARLOS SANTANA – Winner of 2010 Mayor’s Art Award
ANN WEBER – At the de Young Museum through February 28th
ZAHI HAWASS – Comes to San Francisco March 8th
SHANGHAI – Now At the Asian Art Museum
PIANIST MISHA DICHTER – A Conversation
DOUBT – At New Conservatory Theatre Centre
JOSHUA ROMAN – Hot young cellist debuts this week at SF Symphony
PROGRAM 3 – San Francisco Ballet Presents Three Balanchine Masterworks
OEDIPUS EL REY – A World Premiere At Magic Theatre
FIDDLER ON THE ROOF – Some Fancy Fiddling By Harvey Fierstein
PROGRAM 2 – SF BALLET, Opens Tuesday, February 9th
ZUILL BAILEY – A Conversation
SHAKESPEARE GARDEN BUST TO RECEIVE FULL CONSERVATION TREATMENT
SF OPERA SCREENINGS AT SUNDANCE KABUKI
CUNARD QUEEN VICTORIA DAY IN SAN FRANCISCO
CREATION – A Challenging Film Biography on Charles Darwin
SAN FRANCISCO OPERA – Announces Repertory and Casting for 2010/11
SF BALLET – 2010 Repertory Season Opens Saturday, January 23rd
DAVID PERRY – On the “Dos and Don’ts of Social Media”
NATHAN GUNN – A Hit At The Herbst
CONTEMPORARY JEWISH MUSEUM – Our Struggle: Responding to Mein Kampf
HELGI TOMASSON’S 25th ANNIVERSARY – SF Ballet Gala, January 20th
CRITIC’S CHOICE: CD – MICHAEL MANIACI: Mozart Arias For Male Soprano
ROBERT DOWNEY Jr. – Not Holmes For Christmas
CRITIC’S CHOICE – CDS, Pianists: Mitsuko Uchida, Temirzhan Yerzhanov, and Jonathan Biss
CARTIER AND AMERICA – Exclusive Exhibit at the Legion of Honor
ME AND ORSON WELLES
CAMINOS FLAMENCOS – A Conversation with Yaelisa
A CONVERSATION WITH LUCIE ARNAZ – This Week At The Rrazz Room
9 GRAMMY® NOMINATIONS – To Telarc International and Heads Up International
CARTIER – Exclusive Exhibit at the Legion of Honor
ON THE ORGAN – At the Legion of Honor
AMISH ABSTRACTIONS – Fabulous Quilt Exhibit Now at the de Young Museum
JANE MONHEIT – At The Empire Ballroom
VERY POSTMORTEM: Mummies and Medicine – At the Legion of Honor
EXOTIC EROTIC BALL – 30th Anniversary, Friday and Saturday At The Cow Palace
DAUGHTER OF THE REGIMENT – A Hit for San Francisco Opera
FLEETWEEK – Weekend Bash at Pier 39
FLEET WEEK – A Conversation with Airshow Pilot Tim Weber
CRITIC’S CHOICE: “Pulp Scripture”, Hélène Renaut, and teenage YouTube vocalist Jesaiah Baer
CD – THE PLANETS, A Mind-Blowing Meditation
SF OPERA’S “Abduction From The Seraglio” – The Trills and Frills of Captivity
IL TRITTICO – Patricia Racette Debuts In Puccini’s Trio of One-Act Operas
IL TROVATORE – Opening Night A Stunning Success For San Francisco Opera
THE EGYPTIAN (1954) – A Swords & Sandals Cultural Encounter at the de Young Museum
TUTANKHAMUN – And The Golden Age Of Pharaohs
SALLY KELLERMAN – Hot Lips for Hot Hits at The Rrazz Room
DIANE BAKER – Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK
CAMERON CARPENTER – Up Close and Very Personal
RUBEN MARTIN – Principal Dancer with San Francisco Ballet
WICKED – Now at San Francisco’s Orpheum Theatre
CHRISTINE ANDREAS – A Conversation with Beautiful Broadway and Cabaret Star
CD Review – REVOLUTIONARY, Cameron Carpenter, Organist
JENNIFER SIEBEL – A Conversation with Seán Martinfield
sean-martinfield-250-pixels-new-sentinel-mug.jpg
Seán Martinfield
Sentinel Editor and Publisher
Seán Martinfield, who also serves as Fine Arts Critic, is a native San Franciscan. He is a Theatre Arts Graduate from San Francisco State University, a professional singer, and well-known private vocal coach to Bay Area actors and singers of all ages and persuasions. His clients have appeared in Broadway National Tours including Wicked, Aïda, Miss Saigon, Rent, Bye Bye Birdie, in theatres and cabarets throughout the Bay Area, and are regularly featured in major City events including Diva Fest, Gay Pride, and Halloween In The Castro. As an Internet consultant in vocal development and audition preparation he has published thousands of responses to those seeking his advice concerning singing techniques, professional and academic auditions, and careers in the Performing Arts. Mr. Martinfield’s Broadway clients have all profited from his vocal methodology, “The Belter’s Method”, which is being prepared for publication. If you want answers about your vocal technique, post him a question on AllExperts.com. If you would like to build up your vocal performance chops and participate in the Bay Area’s rich theatrical scene, e-mail him at: sean.martinfield@comcast.net.


ABOUT THE SAN FRANCISCO SENTINEL

pat-murphy-social-diary-175
SENTINEL FOUNDER PAT MURPHY
Telephone: 415-846-2475
Email: SanFranciscoSentinel@yahoo.com

A REQUEST FOR MONEY – $10, $20-$1000 – SEND PAT MURPHY TO ISRAEL

JEW HATER FARRAKAHN AMONG WHITE HOUSE RESIDENCE PAMPERED – SAN FRANCISCO SENTINEL OPINION

NETANYAHU DOES THE RIGHT THING – SAN FRANCISCO SENTINEL OPINION

DO NOT FLY SWISS AIR – SAN FRANCISCO SENTINEL OPINION

THE AMERICAN PEOPLE AND NEWS MEDIA ARE AFRAID TO CONFRONT ISLAM – SAN FRANCISCO SENTINEL OPINION

STRAIGHT PEOPLE NEED FALL SILENT WHEN WE SPEAK – SAN FRANCISCO SENTINEL OPINION

HOW CHRISTIAN WERE THE FOUNDERS?


Email Newsletter icon, E-mail Newsletter icon, Email List icon, E-mail List icon
Sign up for our Email Newsletter



Comments are closed.