Z Space and Joe Goode Performance Group present two signature works by Joe Goode Wonderboy and 29 Effeminate Gestures

Joe Goode Performance Group and Z Space are pleased to present encore performances of two of choreographer Joe Goode‘s signature works, Wonderboy and29 Effeminate Gestures, September 25 – October 4, 2014. These performances build on JGPG and Z Space’s successful partnership, which began with the co-production of When We Fall Apart in 2012 and followed with HUSH in 2013.

 

An unexpected and poignant tale of a puppet that overcomes his peculiarity and gift of sensitivity to become a superhero, Wonderboy first premiered in 2008 to critical acclaim. Wonderboy was created by Goode in collaboration with celebrated puppeteer Basil Twist, who is best known for his underwater puppet show, Symphonie Fantastique. Showcasing Goode’s fearless innovation, the integration of puppet with dancers provides audiences with a unique creative experience highlighting the great humanity and sensitivity embodied in Twist’s puppet work. The operation of the puppet becomes part of the dance, at times invisible and other times integrated.

 

Harking back to 1987, Joe Goode’s now legendary 29 Effeminate Gestures is a 12-minute solo set to music by Erik Ian Walker. Stereotypes of masculinity form the basis for what the San Francisco Chronicle at the time called, “a masterpiece of gender deconstruction.” Now a full 27 years after its debut, this seminal (and often comic) work of social relevance takes to the stage in much different times. With performer Melecio Estrella taking over for Goode, this is an opportunity for multiple

generations to sit down and savor how far we’ve come, and perhaps ponder how far we still have to go.

 

29 Effeminate Gestures was a watershed work for me,” says Goode. “I pushed myself to take a very personal topic (the fear of being perceived as effeminate) and to delve into it, to stand on the precipice of what is scary and see if I could peel away some of the fear. To revisit such a work, and to translate it to another body, another soul, was a huge challenge. I was curious to see if I could relinquish ownership of the piece and let it assume new meaning with a new proprietor. The process of ‘turning it over’ has been less painful than I assumed. I have enjoyed watching it transform and yet still retain some of its original intent.”

 

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