RNC Rolls Out Its Millennial Pitch

As Republican Party officials know very well, they’re facing a series of demographic challenges, including a generational problem:Americans under 30 are the only generation that self-identifies as more liberal than conservative. On top of the party’s gender gap and difficulties connecting with minority groups, the GOP is also finding that younger voters reject the Republicans’ far-right message.
But the party is making an outreach effort in the hopes of turning things around. In fact, this week – exactly one year after the “autopsy” report said Republicans have to start doing better with younger voters – the RNC rolled our two new ads intended to appeal to millennials, which will air in 14 states this election year.
I’m neither a millennial nor a messaging guru, but I couldn’t help but notice some of the flaws in the ads.
The first shows a young man named Scott Greenberg in his car, apparently reading cue cards, talking about energy policy.
“I shouldn’t have to check my bank account before I fill up my car, but so much of my paycheck ends up going to gas. We haven’t even talked about my heating bill at home. So when it comes to energy policy for this country, I’m for everything – solar, wind, shale gas, oil, whatever. I’m a Republican because we should have an all-of-the-above energy policy.”
Putting aside questions about whether this is really what millennials care about – don’t young adults drive less than any generation, and less than previous generations of young adults? – it’s also worth noting that President Obama is pushing for an all-of-the-above energy policy, and he’s a Democrat. The White House repeats the phrase all the time.
Scott Greenberg is a Republican because he agrees with Obama on energy policy? For that matter, since when do Republicans support solar and wind? Just two years ago, the party’s presidential candidate said the opposite.
The second RNC ad features Greenberg, still awkwardly reading cue cards, this time at a gas station.
“I feel pretty lucky to have a job. So many people I know are unemployed. It’s like their lives are stuck in neutral. So I get ticked off at politicians who say they want to help the unemployed and then vote for regulations that make it impossible to hire anyone.
“Listen, you can’t help the unemployed by hurting the people who could employ them. I’m a Republican because my friends need a paycheck, not an empty promise.”
First, blaming unemployment on “regulations” is pretty silly. Second, asking a little more from the wealthy in order to invest in job creation is more than an “empty promise”; it’s a sound economic policy.
Alex Pareene wrote a compelling message to Scott Greenberg.
[Y[ou know, it’s sort of weird that your sympathies lie with the people who could employ your friends but don’t, because they are mad at the government. I am just saying. Millennial to millennial.
In fact, millennial to millennial, one thing that connects both of your little messages here is that you seem to be saying you are a Republican because you support policies that will increase the profitability of certain Republican-allied industry interests, like business owners and energy companies, instead of just supporting direct action to help your fellow millennials deal with the real problems of high transportation costs and unemployment. Maybe instead of increased energy production and “not hurting job creators” we could try increased access to (and more reliable) public transit and, I dunno, having the government subsidize the hiring of (or directly hire) people who want to work? Just spitballing.
The RNC’s focus groups must have liked the ads or the party wouldn’t be airing them in states with competitive Senate races. For that matter, there’s nothing wrong with Republicans launching an outreach effort to a constituency that’s quickly moving away from them.
But I have a hard time imagining Democrats watching the RNC’s ads and feeling nervous.
Steve Benin, MSNBC
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