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SFMOMA Presents Work Of Influential American Architect Lebbeus Woods



Exhibition Spotlights Museum’s Deep Holdings of Woods’s Experimental Projects;

Commemorates Career of Provocative Visionary 


From February 16 through June 2, 2013, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) presents Lebbeus Woods, Architect, bringing together 75 works from the past 35 years by one of the most influential architects working in the field. Recognized beyond architecture, Lebbeus Woods (1940–2012) has been hailed by leading designers, filmmakers, writers, and artists alike as a significant voice in recent decades. His works resonate across many disciplines for their conceptual potency, imaginative breadth, jarring poetry, and ethical depth. The exhibition features drawings and models from SFMOMA’s collection, along with key loans from other major design collections.

Woods worked cyclically, returning often to themes of architecture’s ability to transform, resist, and free the collective and the individual. As an architect whose work lies almost solely in the realm of the imagined, proposed, and the unbuilt, his contributions to the field opened up new avenues for exploring, charting, and inscribing space. Lebbeus Woods, Architect provides a thematic, rather than chronological, framework for understanding the experimental and timeless nature of Woods’s work. The exhibition is organized by SFMOMA Acting Department Head/Assistant Curator of Architecture and Design Jennifer Dunlop Fletcher and Assistant Curator of Architecture and Design Joseph Becker

“As the museum embarks on its own physical transformation, the exhibition marks an opportunity to consider the meaning and implication of such a shift,” says Dunlop Fletcher. “There could not be a more fitting body of work to present at this moment.”

As a collector of Woods’s work since the mid-1990s, SFMOMA has assembled the most in-depth institutional collection of his work to date. These works have become the crux of the museum’s architecture and design collection, which is revered for its holdings of experimental, conceptual, and visionary designs. In addition to a selection of SFMOMA’s works, Lebbeus Woods, Architect will include national and international loans from the Getty Research Institute; Museum of Modern Art, New York; and MAK Vienna, along with private collections.

Acknowledging the parallels between society’s physical and psychological constructions, Woods created a career-long narrative of how these constructions transform our being. Working mostly, but not exclusively, with pencil on paper, Woods created an oeuvre of complex worlds—at times abstract and at times explicit—that present shifts, cycles, and repetitions within the built environment. His timeless architecture is not in a particular style or in response to a singular moment in the field; rather, it offers an opportunity to consider how built forms can enhance or hinder individual thought and how a single individual can contribute to the development and mutation of the built world.

In 2011, Woods wrote: “In my work, architecture is meant to embody an ideal of thought and action, informed by comprehensive knowledge of the physical world.” The exhibition will explore Woods’s evolutionary thinking through the recurring themes in his projects, including the political, ethical, social, and spatial implications of built forms. Many of Woods’s projects addressed cities damaged by war, such as Zagreb and Sarajevo, or damaged by nature, as in the San Francisco earthquake drawings. Additional works considered political divisions of space, like in Havana, Berlin, or Jerusalem. Woods also explored alternative architectures, which could complement and provoke existing tropes, as seen in Nine Reconstructed Boxes (1999) and High Houses(1996), both in SFMOMA’s collection. And possibly further afield, Woods suggested entirely new approaches to organizing space, as seen in his Centricity (1987–88) and Conflict Space (2006) series.

“Perhaps unparalleled in his influence within the architecture discourse, the work of Lebbeus Woods holds a timeless significance that transcends the physical and verges on an architecture of intellect,” says Becker. “His legacy will continue to challenge the traditional notion of architecture and provoke the exploration of the vast potentials of the built environment.”

 

About Lebbeus Woods

Born in Lansing, Michigan, Woods studied at the Purdue University School of Engineering (1958–60) and the University of Illinois School of Architecture (1960–64). He worked for Eero Saarinen and Associates, and Kevin Roche John Dinkeloo Associates (1964–68) before moving into private practice. Woods concentrated on theory and experimental projects since 1976, exhibited, lectured, and published his projects worldwide, and wrote numerous articles of criticism about architectural practice and theory. Woods was a professor of architecture at Cooper Union, where taught until his death in 2012. His works are held in the collections of major museums internationally, including MoMA, the Whitney, MAK Vienna, and the Getty Research Institute. Woods’s projects and writing can also be explored in the archives of his blog at lebbeuswoods.wordpress.com

 

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Cal Performances Presents Mark Morris’s Acclaimed The Hard Nut December 14–23 At Zellerbach Hall

“…something approaching a miracle…” (Washington Post) comes to Cal Performances’ Zellerbach Hall, Friday–Sunday, December 14–16 and Thursday–Sunday, December 20–23, as Mark Morris’s The Hard Nut returns to the Bay Area after a three year hiatus for the holidays. It is a festive reimagining of Pyotr Il’yich Tchaikovsky’s beloved Nutcracker ballet—with its tale of childhood hopes and fears, fairytale menace and life-renewing love that Morris sets in the 1970s. It features dancing Barbie dolls, go-go boots, G.I. Joe soldiers, leaping snowflakes, inspired gender-bending casting, 93 costume changes, over 60 set pieces and props including 20 lbs. of confetti for the “Waltz of the Snowflakes” scene, all set to Tchaikovsky’s glorious score. For the first time in Berkeley, Morris will take on the role of Dr. Stahlbaum/King. Sets and costumes for The Hard Nut are based on concepts of comic-book artist and illustrator Charles Burns and were designed by longtime MMDG collaborators Adrianne Lobel (sets), Martin Pakledinaz (costumes) and James F. Ingalls (lighting). Maestro George Cleve will conduct the Berkeley Symphony Orchestra in Tchaikovsky’s complete score and the Piedmont East Bay Children’s Choir, under the direction of Robert Geary, once again lend their voices. “Going back to The Hard Nut is like revisiting a dear old friend. You laugh at the foibles, rejoice at the triumphs and find delight in the familiar. You anticipate responses, but they still evoke laughter and even, occasionally, plunge you into a moment of reflection” (San Francisco Chronicle).

The Hard Nut premiered in Belgium in 1991; it was Morris’s farewell gift to his European hosts before stepping down as Director of Dance at the Théâtre Royal de la Monnaie, the national opera house of Belgium. The production was greeted with unanimous critical acclaim and uproarious applause. Cal Performances presented the West Coast premiere of The Hard Nut in December 1996 and has re-mounted the production often to rave reviews.

ARTISTS
Several dancers return to familiar Hard Nut roles, including Lauren Grant (Marie), June Omura (Fritz), Jenn Weddel (Louise/Princess Pirlipat), John Heginbotham (Mrs. Stahlbaum/Queen) and Kraig Patterson (Housekeeper/Nurse). Dancers Aaron Loux and Billy Smith will perform the roles of Nutcracker/Young Drosselmeier and Drosselimeier respectively. Shawn Gannon, who danced with the company from 1995–2004, returns as one of the Party Guests in Act I and the Dentist in Act II. The rest of the Mark Morris Dance Group join the principals as Party Guests, Rat Soldiers, G.I. Joes, Snow, Suitors, Spaniards, Arabians, Chinese, Russians, Frenchmen and Flowers.

The work of comic book artist and illustrator Charles Burns is the basis for the production’s distinctive look.  Adrianne Lobel (sets), James F. Ingalls (lighting) and Martin Pakledinaz (costumes) are each longtime design cohorts of Morris’.  Lobel and Ingalls have collaborated with Morris on a number of works, including Handel’s L’Allegro, il Penseroso ed il Moderato and Purcell’s King Arthur.  Pakledinaz most recently designed the costumes for Morris’s Festival Dance in 2011.

George Cleve, who will guest conduct the Berkeley Symphony Orchestra, is the cofounder of the Midsummer Mozart Festival and has conducted orchestra nationally and abroad for over 20 years.  Robert Geary is the artistic conductor of the Piedmont East Bay Children’s Choir and together they have toured through the United States and performed in numerous music festivals such as the Oregon Bach Festival and Newport Music Festival.

Mark Morris was born on August 29, 1956, in Seattle, Washington. In the early years of his career, he performed with Lar Lubovitch, Hannah Kahn, Laura Dean, Eliot Feld and the Koleda Balkan Dance Ensemble. He formed the Mark Morris Dance Group in 1980, and has since created more than 130 works for the company. From 1988–1991, he was Director of Dance at the Théâtre Royal de la Monnaie in Brussels, the national opera house of Belgium. Among the works created during his tenure were three evening-length dances: The Hard Nut; L’Allegro; il Penseroso ed il Moderato and Dido and Aeneas. In 1990, he founded the White Oak Dance Project with Mikhail Baryshnikov.

Morris is also much in demand as a ballet choreographer.  He has created eight works for the San Francisco Ballet since 1994 and received commissions from American Ballet Theatre and the Boston Ballet, among others both nationally and internationally.  Morris is noted for his musicality and has been described as “undeviating in his devotion to music” (The New Yorker).

Most recently Morris has been awarded the Benjamin Franklin Creativity Laureate Award (2012) and Leonard Bernstein Lifetime Achievement Award (2010). He is the subject of a biography by Joan Acocella (Farrar, Straus & Giroux) and Marlowe & Company published a volume of photographs and critical essays entitled Mark Morris’ L’Allegro, il Penseroso ed il Moderato: A Celebration.  He also has received 11 honorary doctorates including a recently from the Cornish School of Arts in 2011.

The Mark Morris Dance Group was formed in 1980 and gave its first performance that year in New York City. Based in Brooklyn, New York, the company has maintained and strengthened its ties to several cities around the world, most notably its West Coast home Cal Performances. The group first came to Cal Performances in 1987, and has returned every year since 1994. Visits to Zellerbach Hall include world premieres and West Coast premieres such as Socrates (2010), Romeo & Juliet, On Motifs of Shakespeare (2008), Mozart Dances (2007), King Arthur (2006) Candleflowerdance (2005), Rock of Ages (2004), All Fours (2003), Something Lies Beyond the Scene (2003) and Kolam (2003). More information about Mark Morris and MMDG can be found at http://markmorrisdancegroup.org.

TICKET INFORMATION
Tickets for The Hard Nut Friday–Sunday, December 14–16 and Thursday–Sunday, December 20–23 in Zellerbach Hall range from $30.00– $110.00, subject to change. Tickets are available through the Ticket Office at Zellerbach Hall; at (510) 642-9988; at www.calperformances.org; and at the door.  Half-price tickets are available for UC Berkeley students. UC faculty and staff, senior citizens, other students and UC Alumni Association members receive a $5.00 discount (Special Events excluded). For select performances, Cal Performances offers UCB student, faculty and staff, senior, and community rush tickets. For more information about discounts, go to http://calperformances.org/buy/discounts.php or call (510) 642-9988.

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San Francisco City Hall & Seven Other Historic Civic Center Buildings File For LEED Certification


Mayor Edwin M. Lee today at the U.S. Green Building Council Greenbuild International Conference and Expo being held at the Moscone Convention Center announced that the City and County of San Francisco has filed for LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification for eight buildings in San Francisco’s Historic Civic Center District. The LEED application for Existing Buildings Operations and Maintenance category includes over 2.2 million square feet of civic real estate for San Francisco City Hall, Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall, San Francisco Main Library, Asian Art Museum, Bill Graham Civic Auditorium, Department of Public Health Headquarters, War Memorial Opera House and War Memorial Veterans Building.


“San Francisco is pioneering sustainability for the rest of the world by demonstrating how cities can transform historic areas like our own Civic Center into sustainable resource districts through the use of advanced energy efficiency and water conservation technologies,” said Mayor Lee. “This investment in the first-of-its-kind Civic Center Sustainability District will create a model for the nation in building greener cities.”


Once LEED certified, the Civic Center retrofit strategies and technologies will showcase San Francisco’s environmental stewardship and innovative leadership while providing real results for other cities to replicate across the world. Three buildings – City Hall, Main Library and Davies Symphony Hall – have a goal of achieving LEED Gold certification. The other remaining Civic Center buildings need to complete retrofits before LEED certification goals can be determined.


San Francisco’s already impressive track record within the Civic Center Historic District includes 525 Golden Gate, the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission’s (SFPUC) new headquarters. 525 Golden Gate is one of the greenest office buildings in North America and it will be one of the few San Francisco buildings to earn LEED Platinum status for new building construction and design.


As the City’s municipal water, power and wastewater service provider, the SFPUC funded and managed the energy efficiency retrofits and water conservation upgrades within the Civic Center Sustainability District, making the LEED application filings possible. The SFPUC also will fund and manage the LEED certification process on behalf of the City and County of San Francisco


“San Francisco has overcome the limitations and challenges of a historic Civic Center district and paved the way for cities like ours to continue addressing global climate change,” said SFPUC General Manager Harlan L. Kelly, Jr.


Realizing San Francisco’s Vision for a Civic Center Sustainability District
The new LEED filings represent a significant step towards fulfilling the partnership that San Francisco forged with the former President Bill Clinton and the Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) to transform San Francisco’s Civic Center into a first-of-its-kind sustainable resource district.


To that end, San Francisco built one of the greenest office buildings in North America in Civic Center Plaza at 525 Golden Gate Avenue. San Francisco is also conducting ongoing energy efficiency upgrades for many of the buildings throughout Civic Center Plaza; water conservation upgrades are also being implemented for the same buildings. Additionally, the City has completed initial physical improvements to the Civic Center Sustainability District while promoting resource efficiencies, such as electric vehicle charging stations, free Wi-Fi, and art installations; partnered with a national organization to establish a community urban agriculture garden; created cultural corridors and economic development; utilized federal stimulus funding for a green transformation of an existing key building on the United Nations Plaza, all while providing jobs locally.

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Marsh Theater Adds New Free Entertainment During The Week



New On Wednesday:  Sketch Comedy


Thursday:  
Live Ragtime


Continuing On Friday:  TGIF with a Rotating Band of Entertainers


FREE AND OPEN TO ALL WITH A FULL BAR AND FOOD


Happy hours have become so popular that The Marsh Berkeley is now presenting the same winning mix of fun, food and entertainment on Wednesday and Thursday evenings as well Fridays.


On Wednesday, Mike Spieglman will host sketch comedy groups (or individuals) performing comedic characters, sketches, anything that’s not stand-up comedy! And on Thursdays, starting with the wonderful Larisa Migachyov, the Cabaret will be filled with the deliciously jazzy sounds of live ragtime piano.  Fridays will continue to offer a rotating band of exotic, whimsical and talented entertainers. In November, Wayne Harris is singing the Blues and coming up in December and January, Sebastian Boswell III, mesmerizing mentalist, will give mind-reading demonstrations, as well as display unique physical abilities, including ancient yogi skills, too odd to be explained and which must be seen to be believed.


This is all not-to-miss and completely free – what better way to end the day.


The Marsh Berkeley’s full bar offers festive happy-hour discounts including specialty cocktails and handpicked wine and beer. There is also great bar food—Portobello Panini’s, Mango Guacamole Salsa and fresh-baked cookies. Everyone is welcome; including those getting an early start for our 8 pm performances.

 


Wednesday Sketch Comedy Happy Hour

Sketch (No Stand Up Comedy) Comedy Show

Produced by Mike Spiegelman

Starting December 5, 2012


Sketch comedy groups and individuals performing comedic characters, sketches, anything that’s not stand-up comedy! The showcase launches on December 5th with three solo performances from The Nutballs, including Mike Spiegelman as Rip Van Winkle, 4D the Time-Traveling Comedian, along with Les Milton (White Noise Radio Theater and Sound Cues) and Colin Mahan. Dec 12th: Don’t Watch This LIVE – The best of the San Francisco monthly sketch show. Future shows include all-women sketch groups, The Front Row and Femikaze

 

Thursday Ragtime Happy Hour

Live Ragtime Piano

December, 2012: Larisa Migachyov

Classically trained pianist Larisa Migachyov switched to ragtime after immigrating to the United States from Russia. She performs around the country and has composed 36 rags—more than any other woman in the ragtime world. In her other life, Larisa is a patent attorney in private practice.\

 

Friday Happy Hour

TGIF With a Rotating Band of Entertainers

November: Wayne Harris & Friends Play Jazz, Blues & R&B


The shows will be a bit like an urban A Prairie Home Companion, with various musical and storytelling moments. Think Garrison Keillor meets Langston Hughes with a healthy dose of “Yo Mama” jokes. Here are the lineups:

11/16 & 11/30-The Intones (East Bay’s Best Rock, Blues, R&B and Bugle Band)

11/23 – Jazz quintet, guest pianist and new stories from Wayne Harris

December, 2012 & January 2013: Sebastian Boswell III-Famed Mentalist

Mentalism is the art and entertainment of extraordinary mental powers. Sebastian Boswell III, considered by many one of its most distinctive practitioners, will give mind-reading demonstrations, as well as display unique physical abilities, including ancient yogi skills too odd to be explained and which must be seen to be believed, and otherwise exhibiting his extraordinary physical and mental prowess. An international performer, his career spans the distance from Finland to the country music stages of Norman, Oklahoma, and almost everywhere in between. He has yet to perform in Qatar or Newfoundland, but the century is still young.

 


WHEN:                  6:00 pm – 7:30 pm

WHERE:                Cabaret at The Marsh Berkeley, 2120 Allston Way near Shattuck

For more information, visit www.themarsh.org <http://www.themarsh.org> or call 415-826-5750


 

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MadMaps Introduces The Definitive Scenic Map Of The West Coast



Third in the RIDES OF A LIFETIME SERIES is  complete with over

3,000 miles of scenic roads from San Diego to Seattle


MadMaps — the San Francisco-based producer of back roads maps for bikers, RV owners, weekenders and out-of-towners – just introduced the definitive map of the 3,000 mile Pacific Coast.  The newest map is the 3rd in their RIDES OF A LIFETIME series.   The Pacific Coast map includes off-the-beaten-track attractions, scenic rides, and turn-by-turn directions from San Diego to Seattle

“We spend years compiling information from our customers, and are constantly adding great rides and attractions that are unknown to most travelers,” according to Jenny Lefferts, Founder of MadMaps.  “The Pacific Coast map is the culmination of three years of research and a great addition to the Route 66and Southwest maps in our RIDES OF A LIFETIME SERIES.”

With a portfolio of over 1000 US routes, MadMaps relies on scouts from coast to coast to find the most interesting and fun experiences for travelers.    Each map has turn-by-turn directions and mileage calculations, along with suggested roadside attractions; inter-connectable routes and roadhouses that make each road experience a unique ride tailored to the curious off roader in every corner of the country.

The map retails for $16.95 and is printed on heavy-duty, water-resistant stock.  All three maps in the RIDES OF LIFETIME series are available in a tri-fold nylon case that perfectly fits into a glove compartment or backpack.



To purchase, or for additional information, contact www.madmaps.com

 

 

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Airbnb Study Finds Online Travel Service Has Positive Effects on San Francisco Economy, Neighborhoods

Airbnb, the world’s leading marketplace for booking, discovering, and listing unique spaces around the world, today released a study that highlights Airbnb’s impact on local economies.

The study was conducted by HR&A Advisors, an industry-leading real estate and economic development consulting firm, and demonstrates that Airbnb provides a major economic boost both to its users and the neighborhoods and cities where they visit and live.  HR&A conducts sophisticated economic impact analyses for a wide variety of industries and clients, and cities around the United States come to HR&A for guidance on fostering strong and sustainable local economies and attracting new sources of economic activity.  Drawing on this expertise, HR&A developed a customized approach to quantify the unique impacts of the new kinds of tourism that Airbnb brings to San Francisco.

The study found that people who rent their homes on Airbnb use the income they earn to stay afloat in difficult economic times. Additionally, the study determined that travelers who use Airbnb enjoy longer stays, spend more money in the cities they visit, and bring income to less-touristed neighborhoods.

“Airbnb represents a new form of travel,” says Airbnb CEO and co-founder Brian Chesky. “This study shows that Airbnb is having a huge positive impact – not just on the lives of our guests and hosts, but also on the local neighborhoods they visit and live in.”

The economic impact study underscores the significant benefits that Airbnb, a pioneer of the new sharing economy, has on cities and their residents. Some highlights from the study’s findings:

- From April 2011 to May 2012, guests and hosts utilizing Airbnb have contributed $56 million in total spending to San Francisco’s economy, $43.1 million of which supported local businesses throughout the city’s diverse neighborhoods.

- 90% of Airbnb hosts rent the homes they live in to visitors on an occasional basis, and nearly half the income they make is spent on living expenses (rent/mortgage, utilities, and other bills).

- Airbnb guests stay an average of 5.5 days and spend $1,045 during their stay on food, shopping and transportation, compared to hotel guests who stay an average of 3.5 days and spend $840.

- 72% of Airbnb properties in San Francisco are located outside the central hotel corridor. More than 90% of Airbnb guests visiting San Francisco prefer to stay in neighborhoods that are “off the beaten track.” Over 60% of Airbnb guest-spending occurs in the neighborhoods in which the guests stay.

Founded in August of 2008 and based in San Francisco, Calif., Airbnb is a trusted community marketplace for people to list, discover, and book unique accommodations around the world – online or from a mobile phone.  Whether an apartment for a night, a castle for a week, or a villa for a month, Airbnb connects people to unique travel experiences at any price point, in more than 30,000 cities and 192 countries.  And with world-class customer service and a growing community of users, Airbnb is the easiest way for people to monetize their extra space and showcase it to an audience of millions.

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President Obama, John Boehner begin year-end duel on taxes

Washington (CNN) — Flush with re-election vigor, President Barack Obama on Friday will provide his first public comments on the upcoming negotiations with Congress on how to deal with pending tax hikes and spending cuts that create the so-called fiscal cliff facing the economy at the end of the year.

Obama and House Speaker John Boehner are positioned as the lead negotiators in a showdown between Democrats and Republicans over the issue identified by voters as a top priority: reducing the chronic federal deficits and debt considered a threat to economic prosperity and national security.

Boehner, R-Ohio, has signaled a willingness to deal but also maintained hardline GOP opposition to any tax increase. He will speak to reporters two hours before Obama delivers his statement on the economy Friday afternoon at the White House.

His hand was weakened by the election results Tuesday that returned Obama to the White House, broadened the Democratic majority in the Senate and slightly narrowed the Republican majority in the House.

Retiring GOP Rep. Steve LaTourette of Ohio told CNN that a poll commissioned by centrist Republicans showed that voters wanted Congress to fix the nation’s fiscal problems rather than cling to political orthodoxy.

“They didn’t send the same bunch back to town in this election because they love what they’re doing,” LaTourette said. “They sent him back because they don’t trust either side, but they do expect them to get this thing done.”

While the result was another split Congress like the current session that has become a symbol of legislative dysfunction, both sides have signaled a possible new openness to an agreement that was unreachable in the past two years.

In the final days of the campaign, Vice President Joe Biden referred to private talks with members of Congress on the pending fiscal impacts of expiring tax cuts and mandatory budget cuts. This week, Boehner called on Obama to work with him to complete a comprehensive deficit reduction agreement — the “grand bargain” that eluded them last year.

LaTourette said both Boehner and Obama were held back from a deal back then because of pressure from their respective bases — Republicans who signed a pledge against any new taxes stopped Boehner, while liberal defenders of entitlement programs halted Obama.

“The ‘no tax pledge’ people in the Republican Party yanked Boehner back and the ‘don’t you dare touch the middle class’ entitlement people in the president’s party pulled him back, and as a result those talks collapsed,” LaTourette said.

Boehner made clear this week that a comprehensive agreement won’t happen by the end of the year in the lame-duck session of Congress. He proposed that the two sides use that time to set up a framework for substantive negotiations when the new Congress comes in next year while taking short-term steps to avoid the fiscal cliff.

Sen. Dick Durbin of Illinois, a top Democrat in the chamber, said such a timetable could work.

“We have a chance in the lame duck to at least start the process, and I think there’s a chance to rally bipartisan support,” he said. “These are basic issues we can work out, and the president is in a position to do that.”

The fiscal cliff comprises two main elements. Tax cuts from the administration of President George W. Bush will expire on December 31, triggering a return to higher Clinton-era rates for everyone.

In addition, $1.2 trillion in mandatory across-the-board budget cuts — known in legislative parlance as the sequester — will take effect next year unless Congress finds a way to offset that amount in the federal budget.

Another looming issue will be the need to again increase the nation’s debt ceiling sometime in the spring, creating the potential for more political brinksmanship that contributed to last year’s first-ever downgrade of the U.S. credit rating.

Both sides agree the best outcome would be a broad deal addressing the overall need for deficit reduction, including reforms to the tax system and entitlement programs such as Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid.

However, they remain far apart on exactly how to forge such an agreement.

Obama campaigned on having wealthy Americans contribute more to deficit reduction efforts, and administration officials say the president will veto any package that extends the Bush tax cuts for income over $250,000.

“I’ve already signed a trillion dollars’ worth of spending cuts. I intend to do more, but if we’re serious about the deficit, we also have to ask the wealthiest Americans to go back to the rates that they paid when Bill Clinton was in office,” Obama said last week on the campaign trail.

In an e-mailed statement, Obama campaign policy director James Kvaal said the president wants “a balanced plan that cuts the deficit by $4 trillion with $2.50 worth of spending cuts for every dollar in revenue and reduces spending on Medicare, Medicaid and other entitlements.”

Boehner and Republicans oppose raising taxes on anyone, and instead back a broad reform of the tax system that would lower rates further for everyone while eliminating some deductions and loopholes.

While Boehner said this week that his side was open to increasing revenue from such reforms, he made clear that such increases should come from resulting economic growth instead of higher tax rates.

In essence, Boehner proposed the kind of tax reform championed by failed Republican presidential challenger Mitt Romney, whose plan was criticized by Obama and many economists for being unrealistic in assuming that the combination of closed loopholes and economic growth would equal the lost revenue of tax cuts.

Obama’s victory gives him new leverage in the budget battles after Republicans forced the president and Democrats into prolonged and sometimes bitter showdowns in the last two years, including threats of government shutdowns and default.

One top Democrat with close ties to leaders on Capitol Hill and the White House said that the imminent expiration of the Bush tax cuts means Obama “doesn’t have to do anything and everyone’s taxes go up,” which is a GOP nightmare.

Such an increase would affect personal income tax, the estate tax, dividends and capital gains taxes.

In addition, some officials are hinting the feared sequester cuts don’t have to be implemented right away in the new year, giving at least a few months for a deal to be worked out.

By Tom Cohen, CNN. CNN’s Jessica Yellin and Allison Brennan contributed to this report.

 

 

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San Francisco’s Chinese Historical Society of America Museum Marks 11-Year Anniversary in famed Julia Morgan Building On Saturday, November 10, 2012 from 11 am–4 pm

The Chinese Historical Society of America (CHSA) marks the eleventh anniversary of the opening of its Museum and Learning Center in the landmark Julia Morgan-designed Chinatown YWCA Building at 965 Clay Street in San Francisco. On Saturday, November 10, 2012, CHSA invites the community for a FREE day-long 11th Anniversary Celebration from 11am to 4pm, featuring performances, talks, exhibits, workshops, and refreshments. All events are free and open to the public. www.chsa.org

“We invite the public to be a part of this historic celebration of our 11th anniversary,” says Sue Lee, CHSA Executive Director. “Each year our mission and activities are further enriched. Many landmark events have happened in the Chinese American community this past year, including the inauguration of San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee. We look forward to continuing to share our history through our exhibitions and programs.”

The day’s schedule of festivities includes:

• 11am — Architect and historian Phil Choy speaks about the “CHSA Museum: In Celebration of the Legacy of Julia Morgan.” Choy will focus on the history and influence of Julia Morgan’s architecture as seen in the former YWCA building that now houses the CHSA Museum. His talk is also part of the ongoing Julia Morgan 2012 Festival.

• 12 noon — Artist Frank Wong talks about his “Chinatown in Miniature,” using his miniature dioramas showing an array of different Chinatown scenes, such as an herb shop, a holiday scene, shoeshine station, and single room occupancy hotel. These dioramas solidify images of the past, showing how neighborhood inhabitants lived in those times.

• 1pm — CHSA Artist-in-Residence Charlie Chin, celebrated poet/performer Genny Lim, and the Waikiki Sand Kickers perform a musical tribute to Hawaiians of Chinese descent.

• 2pm — “Re-Pairing” Workshop with Remnants artist Cynthia Tom.
Bring your treasured objects, scraps of material, and little mementos with you to present them in a new context. Cynthia Tom will help you re-imagine your discarded treasures, using adhesives or sewing. Cynthia Tom is a multi-media visual artist who plays with the accepted norm. www.cynthiatom.com

• 2pm-4pm — Gallery tours of the exhibition Remnants: Artists Respond to the Chinese American Experience, featuring five artists whose works focus on personal narrative, memory and family—concepts that characterize Chinese America. The exhibition, on view through December 15, 2012, includes works by Nancy Hom, Michael Jang, Lenora Lee, Cynthia Tom, and Flo Oy Wong. Docents will be available to lead tours of the exhibition in both Chinese and English.

ABOUT THE CHSA MUSEUM:
Founded in 1963, CHSA is the oldest and largest organization in the country dedicated to the documentation, study, and presentation of Chinese American history. Through exhibitions, publications, and educational and public programs, CHSA promotes the contributions and legacy of Chinese America. In 2001, CHSA relocated to the historic YWCA building, designed in 1932 by prolific and innovative architect Julia Morgan.

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SF SYMPHONY January – March 2013

Tickets to the 2012-2013 are available at sfsymphony.org, by phone at 415-864-6000, and at the Davies Symphony Hall Box Office, on Grove Street between Van Ness Avenue and Franklin Street in San Francisco.

SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY
Davies Symphony Hall
Michael Tilson Thomas conductor
Renée Fleming soprano
San Francisco Symphony
Debussy Jeux
Debussy (arr. Robin Holloway) C’est l’extase (Settings of Paul Verlaine) (SFS Commission, world premiere)
Debussy La plus que lente
Canteloube Selections from Chants d’Auvergne
Debussy La Mer
Tickets: $15-$150.  Tickets are available at sfsymphony.org, by phone at 415-864-6000, and at the Davies Symphony Hall Box Office, on Grove Street between Van Ness Avenue and Franklin Street in San Francisco.

SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY
Bing Concert Hall, Stanford University Campus
Michael Tilson Thomas conductor
San Francisco Symphony
John Adams Short Ride in a Fast Machine
Harrison “The Family of the Court” from Pacifika Rondo
Debussy La Mer
The Opening Night of Bing Concert Hall is a celebratory event featuring the San Francisco Symphony conducted by music director Michael Tilson Thomas; Stanford’s ensemble in residence, the St. Lawrence String Quartet; a choral dedication with the Stanford Chamber Chorale and students from the Stanford Philharmonia; and a processional by Stanford Taiko, the student performing ensemble devoted to the art of Japanese drumming.
Tickets are available at this time as a benefit of a Bing Inaugural Membership and a limited number of tickets for the concert only may be available to non-members for purchase at a later date—details to be announced on the Stanford Live website.

RENÉE FLEMING AND SUSAN GRAHAM
Davies Symphony Hall
Renée Fleming soprano
Susan Graham mezzo-soprano
Bradley Moore piano
Music by Fauré, Chausson, Debussy and others
Tickets: $15-$118.  Tickets are available at sfsymphony.org, by phone at 415-864-6000, and at the Davies Symphony Hall Box Office, on Grove Street between Van Ness Avenue and Franklin Street in San Francisco.

SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY
Davies Symphony Hall
Michael Tilson Thomas conductor
Joélle Harvey soprano
San Francisco Symphony Chorus
San Francisco Symphony
Grieg Incidental Music for Ibsen’s Peer Gynt, Opus 23 (semi-staged)
Schnittke, Robin Holloway & others Music from Peer Gynt
Tickets: $34-$150.  Tickets are available at sfsymphony.org, by phone at 415-864-6000, and at the Davies Symphony Hall Box Office, on Grove Street between Van Ness Avenue and Franklin Street in San Francisco.

SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY
Davies Symphony Hall
Alexander Barantschik leader and violin
Catherine Payne piccolo
Jonathan D. Fischer oboe
San Francisco Symphony
Vivaldi Piccolo Concerto in C major, RV 443
Bach Violin Concerto in A minor, BWV 1041
Mozart Divertimento in D major for Strings, K.136(125a)
Bach Concerto in D minor for Violin and Oboe, BWV 1060
Mozart Serenade No. 6 in D major, K.239, Serenata notturna
Tickets: $15-$150.  Tickets are available at sfsymphony.org, by phone at 415-864-6000, and at the Davies Symphony Hall Box Office, on Grove Street between Van Ness Avenue and Franklin Street in San Francisco.

MUSIC FOR FAMILIES with the San Francisco Symphony
Davies Symphony Hall
Donato Cabrera conductor
San Francisco Symphony
Tchaikovsky Russian Dance from Nutcracker
Schubert First movement from Symphony No. 8 in B minor, D.759,Unfinished
Stravinsky Circus Polka
Rimsky-Korsakov The Young Prince and the Young Princess fromScheherazade
Dvořák Slavonic Dance, Opus 44 No. 7
Mahler Third movement from Symphony No. 1 (excerpt)
Tchaikovsky March-Scherzo from Symphony No. 6 in B minor, Opus 74,Pathétique
Rossini Allegro vivace from Overture to William Tell
The Wonderful World of the Symphony: How It All Works! The symphony orchestra can sound like the tiniest whisper or the mightiest roar—they can do it all! Learn about the wonderful world of the symphony and how it all works.  Features music from Schubert’s beloved Symphony No. 8 and the spectacular March from Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 6.
Tickets: $15-$60.  Tickets are available at sfsymphony.org, by phone at 415-864-6000, and at the Davies Symphony Hall Box Office, on Grove Street between Van Ness Avenue and Franklin Street in San Francisco.

CHELSEA CHEN
Davies Symphony Hall
Chelsea Chen organ
Bach (arr. Dupré) Sinfonia from Cantata No. 29, “Wir danken dir, Gott”
Debussy (arr. Chen) Children’s Corner
Chelsea Chen Taiwanese Suite
Ad Wammes  Miroir
Eben Moto Ostinato from Sunday Music
Dupré Prelude and Fugue in B major, Opus 7, no.1
Rod Gorby Jazz Prelude on “I Got Rhythm” (Gershwin)
Vierne Naïades from Pièces de Fantasie
Duruflé Toccata from Suite, Opus 5
Tickets: $20-$30.  Tickets are available at sfsymphony.org, by phone at 415-864-6000, and at the Davies Symphony Hall Box Office, on Grove Street between Van Ness Avenue and Franklin Street in San Francisco.

SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY
Davies Symphony Hall
Charles Dutoit conductor
James Ehnes violin
San Francisco Symphony
Ravel Rapsodie espagnole
Lalo  Symphonie espagnole, Opus 21
Elgar Enigma Variations, Opus 36
Tickets: $15-$146.  Tickets are available at sfsymphony.org, by phone at 415-864-6000, and at the Davies Symphony Hall Box Office, on Grove Street between Van Ness Avenue and Franklin Street in San Francisco.

CHINESE NEW YEAR CONCERT and CELEBRATION
Davies Symphony Hall
Mei-Ann Chen conductor
San Francisco Symphony
The San Francisco Symphony rings in the Lunar New Year and the Year of the Snake at its 13th Annual Chinese New Year Concert and Celebration in Davies Symphony Hall. The celebrations begin with a Festival Reception for all ticketholders at 3:00pm. The pre-concert festivities in the Davies Symphony Hall lobbies provide family-friendly entertainment and activities, including children’s arts and crafts, lion dancing and Chinese calligraphy, as well as complimentary food, desserts and tea bars. The 4:00pm concert celebrates San Francisco’s unique cultural fabric with a blend of traditional Chinese music and instruments, along with classical works by Chinese and Chinese-American composers.
Tickets: $25-$72. Tickets are available through sfsymphony.org, by phone at (415) 864-6000, or at the Davies Symphony Hall Box Office on Grove Street between Van Ness Avenue and Franklin Street. Tickets for the post-concert Imperial Dinner at San Francisco’s City Hall are available by calling the SFS Volunteer Council at (415) 503-5500.

CHAMBER MUSIC with SF Symphony Musicians
Davies Symphony Hall
Bruce Broughton Hornworks—Theme and Variations for 2 Descant Horns, 3 Horns in F, and Tuba
Robert Ward, Nicole Cash, Jonathan Ring, Bruce Roberts, Jessica Valerihorns; Peter Wahrhaftig, tuba
Ravel String Quartet in F major
            Polina Sedukh, David Chernyavsky, violin; Wayne Roden, viola;David Goldblatt, cello
Brahms Piano Quartet in C minor, Opus 60
            Sarn Oliver, violin; Matthew Young, viola; Sébastien Gingras,cello; Akimi Fukuhara, piano
Tickets: $36.  Tickets are available at sfsymphony.org, by phone at 415-864-6000, and at the Davies Symphony Hall Box Office, on Grove Street between Van Ness Avenue and Franklin Street in San Francisco.

SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY
Davies Symphony Hall
Charles Dutoit conductor
Erin Wall soprano
Paul Groves tenor
Pacific Boy Choir Kevin Fox, director
San Francisco Symphony Chorus
San Francisco Symphony
Poulenc Stabat Mater
Berlioz Te Deum, Opus 22
Tickets: $34-$150.  Tickets are available at sfsymphony.org, by phone at 415-864-6000, and at the Davies Symphony Hall Box Office, on Grove Street between Van Ness Avenue and Franklin Street in San Francisco.

GIL SHAHAM IN RECITAL
Davies Symphony Hall
Gil Shaham violin
Akira Eguchi piano
Bach Partita No. 3 in E major for Solo Violin, BWV 1006
Avner Dorman Niggunim (Violin Sonata No. 3)
William Bolcom New Work
Beethoven Violin Sonata No. 9 in A major, Opus 47, Kreutzer
Tickets: $15-$93.  Tickets are available at sfsymphony.org, by phone at 415-864-6000, and at the Davies Symphony Hall Box Office, on Grove Street between Van Ness Avenue and Franklin Street in San Francisco.

RUSSIAN NATIONAL ORCHESTRA
Davies Symphony Hall
Patrick Summers conductor
Daniil Trifonov piano
Russian National Orchestra
Smetana Overture to The Bartered Bride
Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto No. 1 in B-flat minor, Opus 23
Dvořák Symphony No. 6 in D major, Opus 60
Tickets: $15-$93.  Tickets are available at sfsymphony.org, by phone at 415-864-6000, and at the Davies Symphony Hall Box Office, on Grove Street between Van Ness Avenue and Franklin Street in San Francisco.

RUSSIAN NATIONAL ORCHESTRA
Davies Symphony Hall
Patrick Summers conductor
Daniil Trifonov piano
Russian National Orchestra
Verdi Overture to I vespri siciliani
Prokofiev Piano Concerto No. 3 in C major, Opus 26
Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 4 in F minor, Opus 36
Tickets: $15-$93.  Tickets are available at sfsymphony.org, by phone at 415-864-6000, and at the Davies Symphony Hall Box Office, on Grove Street between Van Ness Avenue and Franklin Street in San Francisco.

SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY
Davies Symphony Hall
Pablo Heras-Casado conductor
Stephen Hough piano
San Francisco Symphony
Magnus Lindberg EXPO (West Coast Premiere)
Liszt Piano Concerto No. 2 in A major
Prokofiev Symphony No. 5 in B-flat major, Opus 100
Tickets: $15-$150.  Tickets are available at sfsymphony.org, by phone at 415-864-6000, and at the Davies Symphony Hall Box Office, on Grove Street between Van Ness Avenue and Franklin Street in San Francisco.

ITZHAK PERLMAN IN RECITAL
Davies Symphony Hall
Itzhak Perlman violin
Rohan De Silva piano
Works by Mozart, Beethoven, and Brahms
Tickets: $15-$138.  Tickets are available at sfsymphony.org, by phone at 415-864-6000, and at the Davies Symphony Hall Box Office, on Grove Street between Van Ness Avenue and Franklin Street in San Francisco.

SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY
Davies Symphony Hall
Yan Pascal Tortelier conductor
William Bennett oboe
San Francisco Symphony
Debussy (orch. Büsser) Petite Suite
R. Strauss Oboe Concerto
Mendelssohn Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Opus 11
Tickets: $15-$150.  Tickets are available at sfsymphony.org, by phone at 415-864-6000, and at the Davies Symphony Hall Box Office, on Grove Street between Van Ness Avenue and Franklin Street in San Francisco.

MUSIC FOR FAMILIES with the San Francisco Symphony
Davies Symphony Hall
Donato Cabrera conductor
San Francisco Symphony
Rossini Overture to Barber of Seville (excerpt)
Beethoven First Movement from Symphony No. 5 in C minor, Opus 67
Ibert Third Movement from Concerto for Flute (excerpt)
            Annie Wu, flute (SFS Youth Orchestra member)
Sousa The Thunderer March
Strauss Overture to Die Fledermaus (excerpt)
Beethoven Finale from Symphony No. 7 in A major, Opus 92
Stookey The Composer is Dead
              Nathaniel Stookey, narrator
Composer, Conductor, Musician and You! This exciting concert examines each of these four elements and the ways they depend upon each other for success. Meet composer Nathaniel Stookey and hear one of his most famous pieces—The Composer is Dead—a musical setting of a fun mystery story written by acclaimed author Lemony Snicket.
Tickets: $15-$60.  Tickets are available at sfsymphony.org, by phone at 415-864-6000, and at the Davies Symphony Hall Box Office, on Grove Street between Van Ness Avenue and Franklin Street in San Francisco.

CHAMBER MUSIC with SF Symphony Musicians
Florence Gould Theatre at the Legion of Honor
Alexander Barantschik violin
Florin Parvulescu violin
Jonathan Vinocour viola
Yun Jie Liu viola
Michael Grebanier cello
Schubert Quartetsatz in C minor, D. 703
Shostakovich String Quartet No. 3 in F major, Opus 73
Mozart String Quintet in E-flat major, K. 614
Tickets: $50 Legion of Honor members; $54 non-members.  Tickets are available at sfsymphony.org, by phone at 415-864-6000, and at the Davies Symphony Hall Box Office, on Grove Street between Van Ness Avenue and Franklin Street in San Francisco.

SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY
Davies Symphony Hall
Michael Tilson Thomas conductor
Nadine Sierra soprano
San Francisco Symphony
Mozart Selections from Zaïde, K.344:
Ruhe sanft mein ganzes Leben
Trostlos schluchzet Philomel
Tiger! Wetze nur die Klauen
Bruckner Symphony No. 7 in E minor
Tickets: Open Rehearsal: $22 general, $40 reserved. Concerts: $15-$150.  Tickets are available at sfsymphony.org, by phone at 415-864-6000, and at the Davies Symphony Hall Box Office, on Grove Street between Van Ness Avenue and Franklin Street in San Francisco.

SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY
Davies Symphony Hall
Michael Tilson Thomas conductor
Yuja Wang piano
San Francisco Symphony
Berio Eindrücke
Beethoven Piano Concerto No. 4 in G major, Opus 58
Brahms Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Opus 68
Tickets: $15-$160.  Tickets are available at sfsymphony.org, by phone at 415-864-6000, and at the Davies Symphony Hall Box Office, on Grove Street between Van Ness Avenue and Franklin Street in San Francisco.

CAMERON CARPENTER
Davies Symphony Hall
Cameron Carpenter organ
Tickets: $20-$30.  Tickets are available at sfsymphony.org, by phone at 415-864-6000, and at the Davies Symphony Hall Box Office, on Grove Street between Van Ness Avenue and Franklin Street in San Francisco.
SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY
Davies Symphony Hall
Michael Tilson Thomas conductor
San Francisco Symphony
Mahler Symphony No. 9 in D major
Tickets: $15-$150.  Tickets are available at sfsymphony.org, by phone at 415-864-6000, and at the Davies Symphony Hall Box Office, on Grove Street between Van Ness Avenue and Franklin Street in San Francisco.

SAN FRANCISCO SYMPHONY YOUTH ORCHESTRA
Davies Symphony Hall
Donato Cabrera conductor
San Francisco Symphony Youth Orchestra
Tchaikovsky Serenade for Strings
Respighi Fountains of Rome
R. Strauss Serenade for Winds, Op. 7
Schumann Symphony No. 2
Tickets: $45 reserved seating, $12 general admission. Available atsfsymphony.org, 415-864-6000, or the Davies Symphony Hall Box Office on Grove Street between Van Ness Avenue and Franklin Street in San Francisco.

GIPSY KINGS
Davies Symphony Hall
The Gipsy Kings bring rumba catalana to Davies Symphony Hall.
(Note: The SF Symphony is not performing on this concert).
Tickets: $15-$85. Tickets are available at sfsymphony.org, 415-864-6000, or the Davies Symphony Hall Box Office on Grove Street between Van Ness Avenue and Franklin Street in San Francisco.

BOBBY MCFERRIN
Davies Symphony Hall
Bobby McFerrin vocalist
and his band
Vocal innovator McFerrin performs his “Spirit You All” program, an homage to his father (the opera singer Robert McFerrin, Sr.) and the generations of Americans who sang of our shared joy and pain through the songs commonly known as spirituals.
(Note: The SF Symphony is not performing on this concert).
Tickets: $15-$85. Tickets are available at sfsymphony.org, 415-864-6000, or the Davies Symphony Hall Box Office on Grove Street between Van Ness Avenue and Franklin Street in San Francisco.

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City Arts & Lectures is pleased to announce the line-up for “Conversations on Science 2013.”

The 7 – event series, presented in association with the California Academy of Sciences, features leading scientists on a range of topics including the power of sleep, the science of yoga, the effects of social networks, and the science behind love & attraction.   Tickets ($20-$27) are currently available to City Arts members only and will go on sale to the general public November 15.

All shows are 7:30pm at the Herbst Theatre, with the exception of The Social Network Effect (May 14) and The Science of Love & Attraction (June 4) both at 7:30pm at the Nourse Theatre.  To purchase tickets or for more info, go to www.cityarts.net/science <http://www.cityarts.net/science>

Below you’ll find a chronological list of programs with hyperlinks to guest bios and more info.  You can also access the list of events online here <https://www.cityarts.net/science> .

The Science of Yoga: A Mind-Body Practice with Jon Kabat-Zinn
<https://www.cityarts.net/event/the-science-of-yoga-a-mind-body-practice/> In Conversation with Kelly McGonigal
Wednesday, January 9, 2013, 7:30 pm
Venue: Herbst Theatre
Tickets: $20/$25 (California Academy of Sciences members)  |  $22/$27 (non-members)

Stroke of Insight: Strengthening the Brain with Jill Bolte Taylor <https://www.cityarts.net/event/stroke-of-insight-strengthening-the-brain-with-jill-bolte-taylor-2/>
In Conversation with Thomas Goetz
Monday, January 28, 2013, 7:30 pm
Venue: Herbst Theatre
Tickets: $20/$25 (CAS members)  |  $22/$27 (non-members)

The Brilliance of Sleep with Matt Walker <https://www.cityarts.net/event/the-brilliance-of-sleep-with-matt-walker/>
In Conversation with Amy Standen
Wednesday, February 27, 2013, 7:30 pm
Venue: Herbst Theatre
Tickets: $20/$25 (CAS members)  |  $22/$27 (non-members)

The Power of Language with Lera Boroditsky <https://www.cityarts.net/event/the-power-of-language-with-lera-boroditsky/>
In Conversation with Roy Eisenhardt
Wednesday, March 20, 2013, 7:30 pm
Venue: Herbst Theatre
Tickets: $20/$25 (CAS members)  |  $22/$27 (non-members)

Unlocking the Mysteries of Neuroscience with David Eagleman <https://www.cityarts.net/event/unlocking-the-mysteries-of-neuroscience-with-david-eagleman/>
In Conversation with Kirsten Sanford
Wednesday, April 10, 2013, 7:30 pm
Venue: Herbst Theatre
Tickets: $20/$25 (CAS members)  |  $22/$27 (non-members)

The Social Network Effect with Nicholas Carr <https://www.cityarts.net/event/the-social-network-effect-with-nicholas-carr/>
In Conversation with Thomas Goetz
Tuesday, May 14, 2013, 7:30 pm
Venue: Nourse Theatre
Tickets: $20/$25 (CAS members)  |  $22/$27 (non-members)

The Science of Love & Attraction with Helen Fisher <https://www.cityarts.net/event/the-science-of-love-attraction-with-helen-fisher/>
In Conversation with Michael Krasny
Tuesday, June 4, 2013, 7:30 pm
Venue: Nourse Theatre
Tickets: $20/$25 (CAS members)  |  $22/$27 (non-members)


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THE PHILHARMONIA BAROQUE ORCHESTRA RETURNS WITH HANDEL’S MESSIAH AT FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8 AT 7:00 P.M.

Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra, led by conductor Masaaki Suzuki, with “a subtle ear for color, a keen sense of harmonic direction, and an ability to make phrases breathe and rhythms live” (The New York Times), returns to Cal Performances with George Frederic Handel’s class oratorio Messiah on Saturday, December 8 at 7:00 p.m. at First Congregational Church. This performance will feature the Philharmonia Chorale, directed by Bruce Lamott, and soloists from Suzuki’s ensemble at Yale University’s Institute of Sacred Music: Sherezade Panthaki, soprano, Fabiana González, alto, Dann Coakwell, tenor and Dashon Burton, bass-baritone. Speaking on a recent Handel performance, San Francisco Classical Voice applauded the “irresistible combination of rhythmic verve and sheer delight” of the ensemble.

Handel (1685–1759) completed Messiah in 1742. While it was originally intended for performance during Lent and Easter, Messiah—subtitled “A Sacred Oratorio”—has in modern times become an Advent and Christmas-season mainstay. The work combines Old and New Testament texts concerning prophecies of a savior, the Messiah.


The Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra has presented historically informed Baroque, Classical and early-Romantic music on original instruments since its founding in 1981 by Laurette Goldberg. Nicholas McGegan has been its artistic director since 1985. The group has garnered an impressive reputation including Musical America’s Ensemble of the Year in 2004. Based in the Bay Area, the ensemble has toured nationally and internationally performing in prominent locations such as BBC Proms, Tanglewood, Concertgebouw and Disney Hall.  The Philharmonia Chorale was created in 1995 to provide voices for works that the orchestra performs. This group is composed of 24 singers that have distinguished solo and ensemble experience with San Francisco Symphony, American Bach Soloists, Carmel Bach Festival and others.  The chorale has been led by Bruce Lamott since 1997.

The Philharmonia Orchestra has collaborated with Cal Performances on a number of occasions. Most recently in the 2011-2012 season the ensemble performed in Mark Morris’s Dido and Aeneas with Stephanie Blythe singing the role of Dido and with Morris conducting.

Masaaki Suzuki is currently the director of Bach Collegium Japan and a visiting professor at Yale’s Institute of Sacred Music.  A leading voice in early music, Suzuki has conducted the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Tonhalle Orchestra Zurich, Melbourne Symphony, St. Paul Chamber Orchestra and others.  He has recently won the German Record Critic’s Award in 2010 and a BBC Music Magazine Award with his recording of Bach motets with Bach Collegium Japan. Suzuki last appeared with Bach Collegium Japan at Cal Performances in March 2006.

Soprano Sherezade Panthaki is known as a talent in the field of early-music and has worked with many of the world’s leading early music interpreters including Nicholas McGegan, Simon Carrington and Willim Christie.  She sung Handel’s Messiah previously with the Nashville Symphony.  Born in India, Panthaki recently graduated with an Artist Diploma from Yale School of Music and Yale Institute of Sacred Music where she won multiple awards such as the prestigious Phyllis Curtin Career Entry Prize.  Alto Fabiana González, a Puerto Rican native, recently completed her Masters in Early Music Performance at Yale School of Music, and has since become a rising star in the United States. In addition to solo performances, she has worked with various national and international festivals including the International Baroque Institute at the Longy School of Music, the Norfolk Festival and the Simon Carrington Chamber Singers. Tenor Dann Coakwell is equally well versed in early and lyric opera. He debuted at Carnegie Hall in 2010 as Audrey in Prokofiev’s Dalyekie Morya (Distant Seas) and has worked with such conductors as Suzuki and Helmuth Rilling. He has appeared as a tenor soloist with the five time Grammy-nominated group Conspirare both in performance and in their 2009 CD, Conspirare: A Company of Voices. Coakwell holds his Artist Diploma in Vocal Performance from Yale School of Music and Yale Institute of Sacred Music. Bass-baritone Dashon Burton has recently collaborated with Suzuki, Pierre Boulez and Steven Smith. He sung and recorded with Cantus, an elite nine piece vocal ensemble that travels across the country and collaborates with artists and groups such as the Boston Pops, James Sewell Ballet and Bobby McFerrin. He is a founding member of Roomful of Teeth, a vocal group committed to exploring the full range of possible vocal techniques.

TICKET INFORMATION
Tickets for the Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra on December 8 at 7:00 p.m. in First Congregational Church are priced at $68.00, and are subject to change. Tickets are available through the Ticket Office at Zellerbach Hall; at (510) 642-9988; at www.calperformances.org; and at the door. Half-price tickets are available for UC Berkeley students. UC faculty and staff, senior citizens, other students and UC Alumni Association members receive a $5.00 discount (Special Events excluded). For select performances, Cal Performances offers UCB student, faculty and staff, senior, and community rush tickets. For more information about discounts, go to http://calperformances.org/buy/discounts.php or call (510) 642-9988.

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FISHERMAN’S WHARF CELEBRATES THE 2012 HOLIDAY SEASON

The Fisherman’s Wharf Community Benefit District (FWCBD) announces a full calendar of family fun for the 2012 Holiday Season. From Sunday, November 18, 2012, through January 2, 2013, Fisherman’s Wharf will be a center of holiday lights and activities for visitors of all ages, from unique special events to year-round attractions. Events organized by the FWCDB include a Lagoon Concert & Lighting Event on Saturday, December 1; Fisherman’s Wharf 2012 Crab Fest on Sunday, December 9; the Lighted Boat Parade on Friday, December 14; Tree to Shining Tree Walking Tour and Activities throughout Fisherman’s Wharf from November 18 through January 2; and much more. For a complete schedule of events, visit www.visitfishermanswharf.com.

“With so many family friendly events, shopping, special decorations, holiday lights and the beginning of Crab Season, Fisherman’s Wharf is truly a magical place for both children and adults to visit during the holiday season.” says Troy Campbell, FWCBD Executive Director.

Sunday, November 18, 2012, 6pm — PIER 39 Tree Lighting Celebration
Welcome the holiday season with a day of holly-jolly magic and merriment at PIER 39! Engage in fun for the whole family with interactive exhibits, special meet-and-greets, live holiday music sing-alongs, and more. The festivities culminate at 6pm, as PIER 39’s majestic sixty-foot tree, adorned with glistening ornaments, bows, and twinkling lights, is illuminated against the stunning backdrop of the San Francisco skyline.

Friday, November 23, 2012, 1pm-7pm — 48th Annual Tree Lighting Ceremony at Ghirardelli Square
FREE lives entertainment throughout the day, with the lighting of the Ghirardelli Square Christmas tree at 5:30pm, hosted by Christina Loren of NBC Bay Area, with singing by The Yuletide Carolers from 6pm-7pm. Scheduled performers also include the Contra Costa Chorale (2pm-3pm), City Opera SF (3:15pm-4:15pm), Kevin Toqe (4:30pm-5:15pm), and more. Between 4pm and 6:30pm, Lola Toy Stop will offer a small gift for each child who stops by the store. Ghirardelli Chocolate and special guests will pass out Peppermint Bark Squares after the Ceremony.

Saturday, December 1, 2012, 5:30pm-6:30pm – FWCBD presents Lagoon Concert & Lighting Event
The FWCBD invites the community to gather at the Inner Lagoon on Jefferson Street between Taylor and Jones to sip on hot cocoa, compliments of Ghirardelli, and enjoy the sounds of the San Francisco City Chorus as they perform holiday songs. For the first time ever, a special addition to this year’s festivities includes a countdown and lighting of the Fisherman’s and Seaman’s Memorial Chapel located in the heart of the lagoon, a most picturesque sight alongside the twinkling lights of the decorated fishing fleet and surrounding restaurants. We have also received word that a certain jolly visitor from way up north will make a special appearance. Please join us for this FREE family friendly event.

Saturday, December 8, 2012, 5:30pm-6:30pm — Light the Menorah at Ghirardelli Square
In partnership with the Jewish Learning Institute of San Francisco, Chabad, Ghirardelli Square will light a 9-foot Menorah at 6pm, celebrated with music and good company. The program begins at 5:30pm with Live Music by Jordan Feinstein, a Kid’s Craft Table by Peekadoodle KidsClub, and Orthodox Chews Salt Water Taffy Sampling & Sale.
From 4:30pm-6:30pm there will be a Lucky Lollipop Pull at Lola Toy Stop in Ghirardelli Square’s Lower Plaza.

Sunday, December 9, 2012, 12 noon-3pm — FWCBD presents the Fisherman’s Wharf 2012 Crab Fest, 3rd Floor of the Wax Museum, 145 Jefferson Street in the heart of Fisherman’s Wharf.
Come celebrate the start of crab season with a special crab tasting event! The FWCBD 2012 Crab Fest hails this most sought-after tasty crustacean with three hours of eating, drinking and celebrating the season, with signature crab dishes prepared by chefs from renowned Fisherman’s Wharf restaurants, complimented by local sustainably-produced wines. Participating restaurants include Alioto’s, Bistro Boudin, Blue Mermaid, Cafe Pescatore, Capurro’s, Fog Harbor Fish House, The Franciscan, McCormick & Kuleto’s, and Scoma’s. Tickets for this local food and wine feast are $25 per person, with proceeds to benefit the SF Fire Fighters Toy Program and the SFPD Youth Fishing Program. Tickets are available at http://sfcrabfest.eventbrite.com/ more information is available at www.visitfishermanswharf.com

Friday, December 14, 2012, 6pm — FWCBD presents Lighted Boat Parade
The Fisherman’s Wharf Community Benefit District and the St. Francis Yacht Club join once again to present the oldest and largest lighted holiday boat parade on San Francisco Bay. Beginning at 6pm, more than 60 boats festooned with lights and holiday decorations will parade along the waterfront. A holiday tradition since 1994, the parade includes members of the St. Francis Yacht Club, Fisherman’s Wharf Fishing Fleet, Golden Gate Yacht Club, PIER 39 Marina, and the Sea Scouts. The Fisherman’s Wharf Fishing Fleet will remain lit throughout the holiday season.
The parade route will begin just off of PIER 39, and proceed west past Fisherman’s Wharf, Fort Mason, and the St. Francis Yacht Club, turning around at Crissy Field to return along the waterfront. Restaurants along Fisherman’s Wharf, in addition to offering a fantastic vantage point, will feature traditional holiday menus. Spectators can also enjoy wonderful views from Aquatic Park, PIER 39, the Marina Green, and Crissy Field, with best viewing of this spectacular display at the Sport Fishing Harbor along Jefferson Street between Jones and Taylor.

November 18, 2012 through January 2, 2013 – FWCBD presents Tree to Shining Tree Walking Tour and Activities
Fisherman’s Wharf is truly a magical place to visit during the Holiday Season. This year, the Wharf boasts two decorated Christmas Trees, a lit Menorah, Dickens Carolers, Santa, elves, lights, unique attractions and shopping experiences, and endless choices in restaurants. Special holiday displays and activities will be found all throughout Fisherman’s Wharf, including Ghirardelli Square; The Cannery; the charming Conrad Park; Anchorage Square, featuring Dickens Carolers performing the first three Saturdays in December from 12 noon to 3pm; Sport Fishing Boats lit for the holidays on the lagoon along Jefferson Street; The Crab Wheel wrapped in multi-color lights; Boudin Bakery with help from Santa and his elves, and live piano music; The Wax Museum; Taylor Street with three blocks of trees wrapped in lights; Northpoint Centre with entries for the 7th Annual Gingerbread House Decorating Contest, and entertainment by Santa and the Dickens Carolers in the main concourse on the first three Saturdays in December; PIER 39 with decorated shops and a 60-foot tree adorned with bows, ornaments and glistening lights; and MORE. Full details are available at www.visitfishermanswharf.com

Hosting 8 million visitors a year, San Francisco’s Fisherman’s Wharf is a world famous tourist attraction and a thriving and vibrant local neighborhood and commercial area. Home to world-class dining, shopping, hotels and endless entertainment opportunities, Fisherman’s Wharf is truly the place to start your San Francisco experience.

For more information visit www.visitfishermanswharf.com

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Martha Wash to Headline AEF 30th Anniversary Dinner

December 1 Event to be Held in the National AIDS Memorial Grove Levi Strauss & Co. and Wells Fargo to Cover All Event Costs
The culminating event of AEF’s year-long 30th Anniversary Campaign will be a dinner on Saturday evening, December 1 (World AIDS Day) in a 7,600 sq. ft. clear tent in the National AIDS Memorial Grove featuring entertainment by Martha Wash and underwritten by presenting sponsors Wells Fargo and Levi Strauss & Co.

Martha Wash has agreed to provide the entertainment for the evening under the stars. Ms. Wash began her singing career as one of the “Two Tons of Fun” who sang backup for Sylvester in the late 70s and early 80s. She went on to record several huge dance anthems, including “It’s Raining Men” and “Everybody, Everybody.” Martha and Sylvester performed at several of the earliest AIDS fundraising events in the Castro. When Sylvester died of AIDS in 1988, he bequeathed his future recording royalties to AEF. AEF will honor him posthumously with a Lifetime Achievement Award to be shared with Ms. Wash and accepted by her.

In April, the board of directors of the National AIDS Memorial Grove voted to offer its site to AIDS Emergency Fund for AEF’s December 1 event. The Grove’s annual event “Light in the Grove” is scheduled for Friday evening November 30. Because the tent for that event will remain in place throughout the World AIDS Day weekend, the Grove has offered its use to AEF without charge. AEF and the Grove will be sharing the same sound, light, and event rental contractors which will substantially reduce costs to both agencies.

Levi Strauss & Co. and Wells Fargo have agreed to share top billing as co-presenting sponsors, a move that brings more than $60,000 to AEF – more than enough to cover all production and catering costs of the seated dinner for 350 guests. Along with other corporate sponsors and a long list of individual patrons at $1,000 a plate, AEF has already garnered more than $200,000 in ticket sales. Approximately 100 tickets at $300 each remain unsold and are on sale now at www.aef-sf.org.

AEF’s 30th Anniversary campaign began in January with a $30,000 challenge grant from the Bob Ross Foundation, matching donations from new donors in 2012. AEF then announced thirty “Parties with a Purpose” throughout the year, designed to raise $3,000 each and to reach out to potential new donors. A $15,000 matching grant from James C. Hormel and Michael Nguyen in July challenged individuals to become new major donors to AEF at $1,000 or more. AEF has achieved the fundraising targets set by both these challenge grants. By the night of the 30th Anniversary Dinner on December 1, AEF hopes to be able to announce the full amount of additional revenue raised by its 30th Anniversary campaign.

ABOUT AEF: Since the beginning of the epidemic in 1982, AIDS Emergency Fund has been responding compassionately to the HIV/AIDS crisis by providing immediate, short-term financial assistance.

Over the course of thirty years, AEF has helped tens of thousands of people facing financial hardship while battling HIV/AIDS. The agency has provided more than $30,000,000 to stabilize the living situations and improve the quality of life for San Franciscans with HIV/AIDS who are unable to work – allowing them to live with dignity and remain engaged in the community.

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Yoshi’s San Francisco hosts Superstorm Sandy benefit Nov. 6

Yoshi’s nightclub in San Francisco has booked a trio of world music and jazz/pop acts for a Nov. 6 fundraiser to benefit victims of Superstorm Sandy.

Jacques Ibula, Tad Worku and Foxtails Brigade will perform in a show that kicks off 8 p.m. at the San Francisco club, 1330 Fillmore St. Tickets are $10; organizers say all proceeds will go to the Red Cross efforts to aid victims of the superstorm that slammed New York City, New Jersey and other portions of the East Coast last week.

Ibula, a Congolese singer-songwriter and activist, blends folk and Afro-pop styles into his songs that often deal with faith and the prolonged upheaval in his native country.

Foxtails Brigade is an eclectic San Francisco-based chamber pop outfit fronted by singer-guitarist Laura Weinbach and violinist Sivan Sadeh.

Northern California-based singer-songwriter-guitarist Worku’s breezy jazz/pop style and outsize talent has earned him comparisons to Michaelo Buble and Jason Mraz.

Tickets are available at 415-655-5600 or www.yoshis.com

 

From the Contra Costa Times

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San Francisco’s Chinese Historical Society of America Museum Marks 11-Year Anniversary in famed Julia Morgan Building On Saturday, November 10, 2012 from 11 am–4 pm

The Chinese Historical Society of America (CHSA) marks the eleventh anniversary of the opening of its Museum and Learning Center in the landmark Julia Morgan-designed Chinatown YWCA Building at 965 Clay Street in San Francisco. On Saturday, November 10, 2012, CHSA invites the community for a FREE day-long 11th Anniversary Celebration from 11am to 4pm, featuring performances, talks, exhibits, workshops, and refreshments. All events are free and open to the public. www.chsa.org

“We invite the public to be a part of this historic celebration of our 11th anniversary,” says Sue Lee, CHSA Executive Director. “Each year our mission and activities are further enriched. Many landmark events have happened in the Chinese American community this past year, including the inauguration of San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee. We look forward to continuing to share our history through our exhibitions and programs.”

The day’s schedule of festivities includes:

• 11am — Architect and historian Phil Choy speaks about the “CHSA Museum: In Celebration of the Legacy of Julia Morgan.” Choy will focus on the history and influence of Julia Morgan’s architecture as seen in the former YWCA building that now houses the CHSA Museum. His talk is also part of the ongoing Julia Morgan 2012 Festival.

• 12 noon — Artist Frank Wong talks about his “Chinatown in Miniature,” using his miniature dioramas showing an array of different Chinatown scenes, such as an herb shop, a holiday scene, shoeshine station, and single room occupancy hotel. These dioramas solidify images of the past, showing how neighborhood inhabitants lived in those times.

• 1pm — CHSA Artist-in-Residence Charlie Chin, celebrated poet/performer Genny Lim, and the Waikiki Sand Kickers perform a musical tribute to Hawaiians of Chinese descent.

• 2pm — “Re-Pairing” Workshop with Remnants artist Cynthia Tom.

Bring your treasured objects, scraps of material, and little mementos with you to present them in a new context. Cynthia Tom will help you re-imagine your discarded treasures, using adhesives or sewing. Cynthia Tom is a multi-media visual artist who plays with the accepted norm. www.cynthiatom.com

• 2pm-4pm — Gallery tours of the exhibition Remnants: Artists Respond to the Chinese American Experience, featuring five artists whose works focus on personal narrative, memory and family—concepts that characterize Chinese America. The exhibition, on view through December 15, 2012, includes works by Nancy Hom, Michael Jang, Lenora Lee, Cynthia Tom, and Flo Oy Wong. Docents will be available to lead tours of the exhibition in both Chinese and English.

 

ABOUT THE CHSA MUSEUM:

Founded in 1963, CHSA is the oldest and largest organization in the country dedicated to the documentation, study, and presentation of Chinese American history. Through exhibitions, publications, and educational and public programs, CHSA promotes the contributions and legacy of Chinese America. In 2001, CHSA relocated to the historic YWCA building, designed in 1932 by prolific and innovative architect Julia Morgan.

 

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44th annual ICB Artist Association Open Studios in Sausalito

 The ICB Artists Association is a large, vibrant and diverse community of talented artists in Sausalito, California. Located in a historic WWII-era industrial building (ICB), the lofts are home to artists working in all media, including painting, sculpture, photography, digital media, jewelry, printmaking, fiber arts and much more.

Georgette Osserman, The Right Partner


Winter open studios falls on the first weekend of December each year.  This year is the 44th Winter Open Studios and eighty plus artists are riffing on the musical theme of 4/4 time.  A group show in Gallery 111 “Rhythm and Hues” will highlight the influence of music on art and incorporate materials from the world of music.  Live acoustic youth musical groups will fill the halls with art for the ears.

Karen Strange, Mozart Hat

Here are statements from some of the artists on how music influences their work:

“I can’t imagine painting without the influence of music… it’s the only conduit that takes me from my cerebral thinking to creative thinking. I have often worked on paintings with blind direction until I hear a simple poetic line that sparks an ‘Aha!’ moment. “Like Jewels Upon the Sea;” “Putting Flesh on the Bones of My Dreams;” “Like a Leaf: Your Sugar is All I Need;” “Teardrops Will Kiss the Mountain.” To get a really good energy going I listen to Prince: there’s syncopation, melody, daring, and deliverance—everything a good painting needs!” -Katy Kuhn – Studio 335

“Mozart (and other music of course) influences me so much in my work that I decided to get some old sheet music and print it on silk organza. The Mozart especially lifts my spirits and keeps the muse focused……I have created  hats with the Mozart music on them. Some of the sheet music is antique hand-written or ‘hand-penned’ music.”  Karen Strange – Studio 347

“I did not truly appreciate music until I started painting. There is a universal underlining structure to anything. I never thought I would be able to visualize music. I never thought I would be able to compose a painting.”  Ola Yunak – Studio 346

“I have never painted a stroke without turning the music on first. When I’m hitting the canvas hard, it’s all hip-hop, like Pitbull and Kayne West. I slow it down with Slaid Cleaves and other singer-songwriters, acoustic-style. With Nina Simone, it’s all slow, heavy strokes, sad and lazy.”  Anne-Marie de Rivera – Studio 301

For more information on the ICB member artists visit the artists section, <http://www.icbartists.com/artists.html>  or contact ICB Artists Association.
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New Publc Art to be unveiled at Shipyard as part of ArtSpan annual Open Studios Saturday, November 3


Community family event coincides with Fall Open Studios at
Bayview Hunters Point Shipyard

On Saturday, November 3rd, the first two of 20 panels from the mosaic mural, a new public art work, created by noted San Francisco artist Heidi Hardin, will be unveiled at the annual ArtSpan Open Studios Family Art Day at The Shipyard.
The unveiling will happen at 1pm at the community event, which takes place from 11am to 4p. at The Shipyard – HPS community Center at 151 Galvez Avenue.
“So many people in this community have poured their hearts and souls into this transformative project,” said San Francisco Board of Supervisors member Malia Cohen. ” This marks another step toward the rejuvenation of Bayview Hunters Point. What better way to celebrate than through a display of art and a gathering of families.’’
Family Art Day’s “The Art of Building Community’’ is hosted by ArtSpan and the Bayview YMCA. The two groups have joined to create a day of Family Art Activities that coincides with Fall Open Studios at The Shipyard.
The art piece created by Hardin and her team of local teens and children, Colette Crutcher, and local Middle and High School teachers will be installed in the Hillpoint Park overlooking the historic Hunters Point Shipyard. It is one of 9 public art pieces to be erected throughout The Shipyard community, which currently is under development. The piece titled, “Stream of Consciousness” is a part of the cultural historic recognition program (CHRP) which is one of the community benefit programs included in the Community Benefits Agreement of the the Shipyard Phase 1 Development and Disposition Agreement.
In conjunction with the unveiling, ArtSpan also will announce the winner of a sailboat-making art project between Bret Harte Elementary and Malcolm X Academy. Students from the two schools have been working with The Shipyard’s artist-in-residence Brian Moore to create their own innovative sailboats in celebration of Family Art Day and the America’s Cup.
“It’s so exciting that Heidi Hardin has agreed to unveil her piece on this day devoted to kids and the community,’’ said Cristina Ibarra, program manager for ArtSpan.
Added Kevin Wilson, program director of Urban Services YMCA: “We are thrilled to be part of an event that celebrates rebirth and renewal for the people of Bayview Hunters Point. Good things are happening here, and we want to be a part of it.’’
The community event will include activities such as art-making to face-painting, dancing and even a scavenger hunt. Parents will be able to talk with representatives from a variety of community agencies such as Parent University, Goodwill, SFHDC and the Tzu Chi Foundation.
About ArtSpan:
ArtSpan, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, builds a community by connecting the public to visual arts in San Francisco. Through SF Open Studios, youth and adult education, and art-centric events, ArtSpan creates a platform for artists to thrive, fostering a Bay Area that values the arts.
About The Shipyward:
Located along the San Francisco Bay waterfront, The Shipyard was once the economic heart of Bayview/Hunters Point. Its revival as a thriving neighborhood is underway. A model for green living, The Shipyard promises to be some of the most desirable San Francisco real estate. The new community builds on the existing assets of Hunters Point, which include the nation’s oldest and largest arts colony.
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SPRING EXHIBITIONS FEATURE GLOBALLY CELEBRATED ARTISTS GARRY WINOGRAND AND CHRISTIAN MARCLAY

Garry Winogrand   March 9 through June 2, 2013

The first retrospective in 25 years of work by artist Garry Winogrand (1928ˆ1984)˜the renowned photographer of New York City and of American life from the 1950s through the early 1980s˜will debut at SFMOMA before traveling internationally. Bringing together more than 300 of the artist’s most iconic images with a trove of unseen prints from his largely unexamined archive of late work, the exhibition offers the first comprehensive overview of Winogrand’s complete working life. For more information, read the full release.

Christian Marclay: The Clock   April 6 through June 2, 2013

SFMOMA will present the San Francisco premiere of artist Christian Marclay’s internationally heralded masterpiece The Clock (2010). Constructed from thousands of film clips indicating the passage of time, the work excerpts these moments from their original contexts and edits them together to form a 24-hour video montage that unfolds in real time. Christian Marclay: The Clock will help count down SFMOMA’s launch into its off-site phase during the museum’s forthcoming expansion construction. For more information, read the full release.

 

Also announcing:

Don’t Be Shy, Don’t Hold Back: The Logan Collection at SFMOMA (December 8, 2012 through June 2, 2013) will feature iconic contemporary artsits and a massive installation by Gu Wenda in SFMOMA’s atrium.

 

 

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42nd Annual KPFA Crafts Fair returns to San Francisco December 8 and 9

 

A beloved holiday tradition, the KPFA Crafts Fair offers an intimate and relaxed bazaar style shopping experience with over 200 artisans offering unique handcrafted gifts under one roof. Original and contemporary handcrafted items in all media from wearable art to art for the home will be featured; leather, glass, textiles, ceramics, jewelry, gourmet food, self-care products and more.

EXHIBITORS

Many artists at the fair have come from a long lineage of craft workers that are passing the trade onto the next generation. Karl Schroen of Sebastopol is a 4th generation blacksmith who makes exquisite knives. He uses tools passed down from his great, great grandfather. Rupam Henery of Rupam’s Apothecary is part of a family lineage of herbalists and pharmacists reaching back 13 generations. She creates quality tinctures, salves and herbal remedies for self care. Niko Culevski from Washington State is the 6th generation of weavers originating from Macedonia. He creates hand-woven wool blankets on a loom just the way his parents taught him, a skill he is now teaching his children. David Giulletti, a fine Jeweler from Berkeley, is teaching his two teenagers his craft in expectation that one will take up the family business some day. Supporting artists such as these insures that their skills will not be lost but can continue for generations to come.

 

Creatively using recycled materials in their work is a popular theme for artists at this year’s fair. At least 25% of the exhibiting artisans use re-purposed materials and are “Up Cycling.” Shoppers who care to keep their carbon footprint light will be pleased to find books bound for the trash bin transformed into safes, clocks and shelves by Denise Jones of Cutten, CA. Paul Loughridge of Morgan Hill, CA transforms what most people would consider junk into one-of-a-kind, surreal, cyber/steam punk assemblage sculptures. Nicole Flood of Flood Clothing in Portland buys previously worn clothes by the pound, deconstructs and re-sews them into her fashionable new designs.

 

SPECIAL EXHIBITIONS

 

KPFA Crafts Fair and ACCI Gallery Proudly announce their second annual Collaborative Exhibition: CreativiTea. This exhibit will showcase artworks incorporating and /or depicting tea, tea leaves, tea bags and artworks crated for or about drinking tea. After the fair, the exhibit will be on display March 9 – April 8, 2013 at the ACCI Gallery in Berkeley.

 

12×12 returns this year! 12 artists make 12 pieces of art in 12 months. The pieces must finish at 12 inches square. What began as a challenge to get back into exploring new ideas and making art a commitment, a group of artists have been meeting monthly this past year to support their goal of creating 12 new works. Come see the end result and become inspired.

 

FOOD & MUSIC

 

The mezzanine overlooking the fair at the Concourse will host tasty fare and festive acoustic music allowing fair goers to relax, refuel and plan the rest of their shopping.

 

TRANSPORTATION

 

The Fair makes it easy to travel to the event in green style by providing complimentary shuttles from the Civic Center BART/MUNI Station, at 8th and Market and from the Caltrain station at 4th and King Streets.

 

ABOUT KPFA

 

KPFA 94.1FM is the nation’s original listener-sponsored, noncommercial, public radio station founded in 1949. The mission of KPFA is to encourage cultural diversity and pluralistic community expression; to contribute to a lasting understanding between individuals of all nations, creeds and colors; to promote freedom of the press and to serve as a forum for various points of view, and to maintain an independent funding base.

 

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS: BART, East Bay Express, SF Weekly, Commonground Magazine.


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Center REPertory Company Presents A Christmas Carol

Just in time to celebrate the season, Center REPertory Company is pleased to present Charles Dickens’s holiday classic, A Christmas Carol. Hailed by critics as “…THE Christmas Carol to see in the Bay Area,” this REP favorite is celebrating its fifteen year, and first with the award winning, Bay Area favorite Mark Anderson Phillips debuting in the role of the miserly, joyless Ebenezer Scrooge. With only 16 performances, tickets are expected to sell fast. The show opens Saturday, December 8th at 7:30 p.m. Center REP Managing Director Scott Denison directs the ensemble of new faces and old pros, from the tragically doomed Jacob Marley to the incurably optimistic Tiny Tim. Ticket prices starting at $41 and can be purchased by calling 925.943.SHOW.


A Christmas Carol is the enduring and inspiring tale of redemption that follows Ebenezer Scrooge’s transformation after meeting a series of ghosts one evening. Theatregoers of all ages will enjoy this traditional holiday treat. Returning patrons will remember fondly the outlandish antics of Michael Ray Wisely as Christmas Present and the daunting specter of Jacob Marley, played by Jeff Draper, but more than a few changes and surprises keep the annual production fresh and exciting.  Director Scott Denison says “the advantage of doing this year after year is that on opening night, I’m sitting in the back of the house and thinking “next year, I want to add this, and next year, I want to add that.”

Placed at the helm of one of the most popular and retold Christmas tales, director Scott Denison focuses on keeping his version fresh and familiar simultaneously. The freshness comes from out-of-this world special effects, and familiarity comes through the story and the recurring cast of characters that audiences from around the Bay Area have come to know and love each holiday season.

Joining the cast this year, Director Scott Denison is proud to introduce Mark Anderson Phillips in the role of Ebenezer Scrooge. This will be Phillips 8th production with Center REP.   “Mark will bring a new dynamic to this production,” Denison continues, “When you change a lead it affects all the other characters and will bring a fresh new outlook in telling this wonderful story.”

“It’s not the crotchety mean guy who is hard to portray,” Denison insists, “it’s the reborn man.  It’s so important to the storytelling.  Mark will bring honesty and sincerity.” I think he’s going to excel at it:  he’s a workhorse and a brilliant actor.”

“We have all lost our way at some point, have closed down and shut ourselves off.  Dickens reminds us how amazing and essential it is to open our hearts,” says Phillips, a recipient of three Bay Area Drama Critics’ Circle Awards and a favorite artist at Center REP.

“The audiences leave here ready to give each other a hug.”  Denison claims, noting that special effects and other theatre magic enhance Dickens’ classic story.  “It snows in the Hofmann Theater, after all!” he says, laughing.

A Christmas Carol is sure to warm the wintry heart of even the most hard-nosed Scrooge.

Director Scott Denison has directed and created lighting designs for over 200 productions, including Center REP’s acclaimed The Wizard of Oz, A Christmas Carol, Shirley Valentine and Dear Liar. Denison serves as Managing Director of Center REPertory Company, is the director and co-founder of Fantasy Forum Actors Ensemble, and created the Contra Costa County Shellie Awards. He has directed A Christmas Carol every year for the past eight years. “This story is a joy to return to every year for the actors, designers, and staff of Center REP. In the somber days of winter, this timeless tale of moving from darkness to light is certainly worth retelling,” remarks Denison. “The warmth and laughter are infectious.”

 

Featuring: Mark Anderson Phillips*, Michael A. Berg, Evan Boomer, Amanda Denison, Max DeSantis, Jeff Draper, Trevor Gomez, Nicole Helfer, Tim Homsley, Andrew Humann, Heather Kellogg, Britt Lauer, Maggie Mason, Everett Meckler, Robin Melnick, Marty Newton, Jason Pedroza, Jeanine Perasso, Grace Perry, Vince Perry, Barbara Reynolds, Tim Reynolds, Joel Roster, Kristina Schoell, Kerri Shawn, Claire Shepard, Grant Strain, Scott Strain, Molly Thornton, Kyle Valentine, Michael Wiles*, Michael Ray Wisely*, Olivia Wisely, Wendy Wisely, Brady Wright, with Narration by Ken Ruta*

 

The design team features:

Lighting Designer: John Earls, Sound Designer: Jeff Mockus, Casting Director: Jennifer Denison Perry, Scenic Designer: Kelly Tighe, Stage Manager: Jeff Collister*

 

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OSCAR QUALIFIED SHORT, “FOR SPACIOUS SKY” TO SCREEN AT HISTORIC CASTRO THEATRE

 Local Filmmakers Announce November 3 Screening of Film

Shot and Co-Produced in Bay Area

Lobo Production Group, Lucky Dragon Productions – Oscar qualified short film, “For Spacious Sky” is scheduled to make its San Francisco premiere on Saturday, November 3, 2012, at the historic Castro Theatre (429 Castro Street, San Francisco, CA 94114) at 5:30 PM, as part of the Scary Cow Productions Indie Co-Op Festival. Shot in Chico, CA, and co-produced by San Francisco based production company, Lucky Dragon Productions (in association with Lobo Production Group), “For Spacious Sky” tells the true story of three estranged brothers who reunite on November 2, 2008, the day that President Barack Obama was elected to his first term in office.

Inspired by actual events and set on Election Day 2008 against the sweeping landscape of rural America, For Spacious Sky is the inspiring story of three lost brothers finding their way back to each other – one from hate, one from addiction, and one from discrimination. Eli, an ex-con white supremacist struggling to start his life over, and Clay, a gay novelist, must set aside their differences for the day to bring their drug- addicted younger brother, Kevin, to rehab. On this day of our nation’s most important decision, these three estranged brothers find themselves at a similar crossroads and must choose either to remain broken or to change.

Lucky Dragon Productions commented “To bring this piece to the Scary Cow Indie Film Co-op Festival here at the Castro where many of the crew met and honed their craft is an honor. The film, a very human story, is our contribution to the dialog for the Presidential election on November 6th and we are thrilled to engage with a large San Francisco audience three days before the voting begins”

“For Spacious Sky” will open the concluding phase of the 18th annual Scary Cow Productions Indie Co-Op Festival (www.scarycow.com) at the historic Castro Theatre on Friday, November 3, at 5:30 PM. The festival features short films made by Bay Area filmmakers. Following the screening of “For Spacious Sky,” the filmmakers will be available for a Q&A with audience members and will attend an after party at The Castro Theatre immediately following the program where they will be available for further questions and discussion. Lucky Dragon Productions will also be premiering their latest short, “Christian & The Boss” at the festival.

For more information on the Scary Cow Indie Co-Op Festival and to purchase tickets to see “For Spacious Sky,” please visit http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/287188. For the full festival schedule at the Castro Theatre, please visit http://www.castrotheatre.com/p-list.html.

To learn more about “For Spacious Sky” please go to www.forspaciousskythefilm.com. For more on Lucky Dragon Productions, www.luckydragonproductions.com, and you can learn more about Lobo Productions at www.lobopg.com

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New environmental curriculum corrects plastic bag information Industry trade group had influenced text in 11th-grade teachers’ edition

California Watch reported last year that whole sections of an 11th-grade teachers’ edition guide for a new curriculum had been lifted almost verbatim from comments and suggestions submitted by the American Chemistry Council, the chemical and plastics industry trade group.

That investigation spurred politicians and state regulators to demand an examination into how the controversial text was compiled and changed, and whether industry bias was present.

State schools chief Tom Torlakson issued a statement saying his office would work with Cal/EPA to examine the material and identify areas “where further review may be warranted.”

And state Sen. Fran Pavley, D-Santa Monica, also called for an investigation, to which Cal/EPA responded by saying it would review the chapter.

The new text provides more updated statistics on plastic bag consumption and recycling rates, many of which were provided by California Watch in its story on the textbook.

For instance, while the old text used a statistic offered by the American Chemistry Council indicating that 12 percent of Americans recycle plastic shopping bags, the new text notes “recycling rates specific to plastic shopping bags are not currently calculated by state or federal agencies.”

It also refers to a CalRecycle’s estimate, which suggests that recycling rates may be as low as 3 percent.

“This is the final revised version, which will be available to members of the public and teachers for download,” said Bryan Ehlers, assistant secretary of education and quality programs at Cal/EPA.

“We think the curriculum is excellent, and this process gave us the opportunity to go through it with a fine- toothed comb, getting at the same goal of producing a thoughtful and reasoned discussion about the consequences of consumption,” Ehlers said.

In 2003, a state law was enacted requiring environmental concepts and principles be taught to all of California’s K-12 public school students.

Cal/EPA outsourced the development and editing of the curriculum to Gerald Lieberman, director of the State Education and Environment Roundtable. The roundtable is a nonprofit group originally developed by departments of education in 16 states to enhance environmental education in schools.

Lieberman incorporated nearly all of the trade group’s suggestions, including adding a new section to the text called “Advantages of Plastic Shopping Bags.”

The California curriculum covers science, history, social studies and arts and weaves in environmental principles and concepts within 85 units and hundreds of pages. The full-color pages of the curriculum, which can be downloaded from the state’s website, mirror the look of a textbook. Teachers are encouraged to use the materials as handouts in the classroom and as reading assignments for students.

Ehlers, the Cal/EPA official, said that after the revised curriculum was posted for review, the agency received about a half-dozen comments, and none from the American Chemistry Council.

The American Chemistry Council did not reply to a California Watch request to respond to the new revisions.

According to Ehlers, the agency has now trained about 2,000 teachers with the new curriculum, which is likely to reach about 60,000 students in more than 100 school district across the state.

 

By SUSANNE RUST, (from the Bay Citizen)

 

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San Francisco Open Studios Heads Into Final Weekend November 3 & 4

With over 900 artists it is the country’s oldest and largest open studio event

Saturday & Sunday, November 3 & 4: 11am – 6pm

For the past month, San Francisco has come alive with art as ArtSpan (www.artspan.org) continues to present its 37th Annual SF Open Studios – the oldest and largest event of its kind in the country. From Dogpatch to Fort Mason, the Mission to Ocean Beach, each weekend features new neighborhoods to explore as more than 900 emerging and established artists open their studios to show and sell their work during the month-long event. It’s an unrivaled opportunity for art patrons, collectors, and admirers to connect one on one with artists, get a glimpse of the working artist’s life, and to find their next true art love.

This coming weekend is the final chance to experience the 2012 SF Open Studios: Saturday & Sunday, November 3 & 4, from 11am to 6pm.  This weekend features artists working at the Hunters Point Shipyard & Islais Creek Studios.  In addition, the SF Open Studios Exhibition continues this week, through November 4, at the SOMArts Cultural Center, Main Gallery (934 Brannan St. San Francisco): Tuesday – Friday, 12pm – 7pm; Saturday, 11am – 5pm; Sunday, 11am – 3pm

“SF Open Studios absolutely epitomizes the breadth, depth, and diversity of the city itself,” says ArtSpan Executive Director Heather Holt Villyard. “There’s no other event that illuminates the abundance and vibrancy of San Francisco’s arts and culture in the same way.”

About ArtSpan
ArtSpan, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, builds a community by connecting the public to visual arts in San Francisco. Through SF Open Studios, youth and adult education, and art-centric events, ArtSpan creates a platform for artists to thrive, fostering a Bay Area that values the arts.

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Victory for San Bruno, S.F., Ratepayer Advocates Over CPUC, PG&E Scheme to Impose Unilateral Mediation in San Bruno Blast Settlement

Former Sen. George Mitchell his law firm DLA Piper have offered to back out as mediators in talks to determine the fines Pacific Gas & Electric Co. should pay for the deadly San Bruno pipeline blast, the San Francisco Chronicle reported today.

“Sen. Mitchell and his law firm DLA Piper did the right thing by telling the California Public Utilities Commission that he wouldn’t mediate settlement discussions in the San Bruno explosion and fire without all the parties agreeing. We are very pleased and looking forward getting back to direct negotiations with PG&E,” said San Bruno Mayor Jim Ruane.

“We hope this decision sends an important message to the CPUC and PG&E. They must immediately return to the negotiation table and offer a real settlement to atone for the safety laws they violated and the people and community they have devastated.

“We thank the City of County of San Francisco, the Division of Ratepayer Advocates, and TURN for standing with us to fight and stand up for fairness and to ensure justice is done in San Bruno and statewide.  We also thank Assemblyman Jerry Hill and the citizens of San Bruno for standing firm and challenging the CPUC and PG&E actions.

“The unilateral announcement this past week by the CPUC that it had selected a mediator without consulting any of the parties is consistent with the cozy and unholy relationship between the CPUC and PG&E.  This action was symbolic of the broken, dysfunctional and dishonest relationship between PG&E and the CPUC, the agency that is supposed to be the watchdog and protector of the public’s interest.

“We call into question the integrity of the entire CPUC process that has occurred over the past two years since our community was ripped apart by the negligent and systematic safety failures of PG&E and the inability of the CPUC to independently protect and represent the interests of the residents of San Bruno and the people of California.

“We look forward to returning to the settlement negotiations to represent the interests of the citizens of San Bruno, the memory of those whose lives were taken by PG&E’s negligence, their families and friends, and equally important, every other city, town and community in the State of California so we can help others prevent what happened to us,” Mayor Ruane concluded.

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THE WARSAW PHILHARMONIC AND CONDUCTOR ANTONI WIT PERFORM TWO CONCERT PROGRAMS AT DAVIES SYMPHONY HALL NOVEMBER 11 AND 12

Both programs feature pianist Yulianna Avdeeva performing concertos by Chopin and Beethoven

The Warsaw Philharmonicand Artistic Director Antoni Witperform two concert programs at Davies Symphony Hall on November 11 and 12.  On November 11, they perform Chopin’s Piano Concerto No. 2 with pianist Yulianna Avdeeva and Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 6, Pathetique.  On November 12, they perform Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 5, Emperor, also with pianist Yulianna Avdeeva, and Dvořák’s Symphony No. 8.

Founded in 1901 by a group of financiers and musicians, the Warsaw Philharmonicbecame the most preeminent performing ensemble in Poland.  Following the destruction of its hall during World War II, the Orchestra performed in sports halls and theatres.  After the construction of a new hall in 1955, under the conductor Witold Rowicki the Orchestra modernized and cultivated the work of Polish composers.  Under the direction of current Artistic Directory Antoni Wit, the Orchestra has continued to champion the work of Polish composers, making numerous recordings and winning many awards for its recordings of works by Lutosławski, Szymanowski, and Penderecki, among others.  In July 2012, Wit and the Warsaw Philharmonic received a Choc award for their April 2012 album of music by Gorecki, recorded just after the composer’s death in 2010. The Orchestra also hosts the annual Chopin Piano Competition.

In addition to their standard and contemporary orchestra repertoire, the Warsaw Philharmonic is well-known for its work in performing the soundtracks to various anime films.  Its credits include the films Battle Royale and Battle Royale II: Requiem, in addition to performing Square Enix’sscore for Final Fantasy XIII.

Winner of the 2010 Chopin Piano Competition, Yulianna Avdeeva recently debuted with the New York Philharmonic under Music Director Alan Gilbert in Warsaw and New York and also with the NHK Symphony Orchestra under Charles Dutoit in Tokyo.  An avid chamber musician, Avdeeva regularly collaborates with violinist Julia Fischer and with the Philharmonia Quartet, comprised of musicians of the Berlin Philharmonic. In addition to accompanying the Warsaw Philharmonic on their fall 2012 US tour, she debuts this season with the Orchestra dell’Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia under Gaetano D’Espinosa and the Rundfunk-Sinfonieorchester Berlin under Marek Janowski.

WARSAW PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA                     Sunday, November 11 at 7 pm
Davies Symphony Hall

Antoni Wit conductor
Yulianna Avdeeva piano
Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra

Lutosławski Little Suite
Chopin Piano Concerto No. 2 in F minor, Opus 21
Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 6 in B minor, Opus 74, Pathétique

WARSAW PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA                     Monday, November 12 at 7 pm
Davies Symphony Hall
Antoni Wit conductor
Yulianna Avdeeva piano
Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra

Beethoven Piano Concerto No. 5 in E-flat major, Opus 73, Emperor
Dvořák Symphony No. 8 in G major, Opus 88

TICKETS:              $15-$93.  Tickets are available at sfsymphony.org , by phone at 415-864-6000, and at the
Davies Symphony Hall Box Office, on Grove Street between Van Ness Avenue and
Franklin Street in San Francisco.

CD SIGNINGS:      Yulianna Avdeeva will sign her CDs in the Symphony Store following both performances.

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