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MAYOR EXPRESSES CONDOLENCES on passing of MTA Board Chair Cleopatra Vaughns

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Cleopatra Vaughns

Mayor Gavin Newsom was saddened to hear of the passing of former MTA Board Chairman Cleopatra Vaughns yesterday. Newsom expressed his condolences to the family and friends of Vaughns stating, “At this time, I join with other civic leaders and those who had the pleasure to work and know Cleopatra, our most sincere condolences.”

Reflecting on the contributions of Ms. Vaughns, Newsom went on to say “Cleopatra shepherded the Municipal Transportation Agency during some difficult financial times and was responsible for bringing Nathaniel P. Ford, Sr. to San Francisco to run the MTA. The city has lost an exceptional civic and community leader.”

Ms. Vaughns was one of the “original members” of the Municipal Transportation Agency Board of Directors, appointed in 2000 by Mayor Willie L. Brown, and retired from government service in 2006. Cleopatra was Chairman of the MTA Board from 2004-2006.

As a retired registered nurse and Manager of Community and Marketing Relations for Blue Shield, Cleopatra held leadership positions in many community, business and professional organizations including Chairman of The City Club of San Francisco, the San Francisco Convention and Visitors Bureau and National President of the National Association of Negro Business and Professional Women’s Club.

Ms. Vaughns also served on the Board of Directors of the American Public Transportation Association, and was active in the Northern California Chapter of the Committee of Minority Transportation Officials.

Former Mayor Willie L. Brown named a day in her honor and the League of Women Voters of San Francisco recognized Ms. Vaughns a “Woman who could be President”. Ms. Vaughns, an avid jazz pianist, is survived by her beloved son, Phillip Vaughns, Esq.

Mayor’s Office of Communications

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JUDGE RULES evidence warrants trial for San Francisco Supervisor Ed Jew – Nine felonies counts

A judge says evidence brought by prosecutors warrants a trial for Supervisor Ed Jew on nine felonies for claiming residency and running for office in San Francisco when a home loan document he filed in 2005 reported six years’ residence in Burlingame.

San Francisco Superior Court Judge Harold Kahn set August 20 as the date for further arraignment and setting of a trial date. Conviction on the charges could strip Jew from his spot on the Board of Supervisors and result in prison time.

Kahn’s ruling followed the conclusion of a preliminary hearing in which investigators and neighbors in the vicinity of 28th Avenue gave testimony that prosecutors arranged to substantiate their charges that Jew was not living there when he registered to vote nor while he filed papers to begin the process of running for supervisor.

Outside court today Jew was asked how he would handle being a defendant in a criminal trial while still fulfilling the responsibilities of his public office.

“Let me just say this, I was at the board meeting until about 8:30 last night. And if need be, I’ll be there today, tomorrow, the next day and so forth,” Jew told reporters.

“You make it work.”

A representative of the district attorney’s office said she expected a trial to last between one and two weeks.

Jew is the subject of a separate FBI probe into his alleged acceptance of $40,000 in cash from a group of businessmen having permit problems. Jew denies wrongdoing and no federal charges have been filed.

Bay City News

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CALIFORNIA GOVERNOR announces appointments

Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger today announced the following appointments

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Elmy Bermejo, 52, of San Francisco , has been appointed to the Commission on the Status of Women. She has served on the Commission since 2003. Bermejo has also served as special assistant to Senate President Pro Tempore Don Perata since 2004 and a partner of Tommy’s Heavenly Margarita Mix since 2005. Previously, she was a district representative for Senator John Burton from 1995 to 2004 and district director for Congresswoman Lynn C. Woosley from 1993 to 1994. Bermejo is board president of the Hispanas Organized for Political Equality (HOPE) and a member of the Women’s Foundation of California. This position requires Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Bermejo is a Democrat.

H. Benjamin Curry, Jr., 57, of Atascadero , has been appointed warden of the Correctional Training Facility. He has served in the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) since 1974 and currently serves as acting warden of the Correctional Training Facility. Curry was chief deputy warden at the California Men’s Colony (CMC) from 2003 to 2006. Prior to this promotion, he held several positions at CMC from 1995 to 2003. Curry was facilities captain at the Sierra Conservation Center in 1995 and served as correctional lieutenant at California State Prison, Sacramento and Folsom State Prison from 1993 to 1995. He began his career with CDCR as a correctional officer at the California Institute for Men in 1974. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $129,108. Curry is a Republican.

Lindy DeKoven, 53, of Los Angeles , has been appointed to the Commission on the Status of Women. She has served on the Commission since 2006 where she currently holds the position of first vice chair. Since 2002, DeKoven has served as president of DeKoven Entertainment, a television production company. Previously, she was executive vice president of NBC Entertainment from 1993 to 2000 and, prior to that, was vice president of Warner Brothers Television from 1991 to 1993. DeKoven is a member of the Leukemia/Lymphoma Society Board of Directors and the Los Angeles Zoo Association. This position requires Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. DeKoven is a Democrat.

Tonya Hoover, 45, of Concord , has been appointed assistant state fire marshal for the Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CAL FIRE). Since 1998, she has served as the fire marshal for the Moraga-Orinda Fire District. From 1990 to 1998, Hoover was a deputy fire marshal at the University of California , Berkeley . Previously, she served as a fire inspector for the Riverview Fire Protection District from 1989 to 1990 and held the same position for the Dublin San Ramon Services District from 1987 to 1988. Hoover is a member of the National Fire Protection Association Standards Committee and the International Fire Service Training Association Validation Committee. She is also past president of the California Fire Chiefs Association Fire Prevention Officers-Northern Section. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $110,280. Hoover is a Republican.

Robert Mason, 52, of San Francisco , has been appointed legal advisor to the Public Utilities Commission (PUC). He has worked for Bergman and Dacey Incorporated since 1989 and currently serves as of counsel. Mason previously served as an associate attorney for the law firm Cotkin, Collins & Franscell from 1986 to 1989 and held the same position with Daniels, Baratta & Fine from 1985 to 1986. Prior to that, he was a contract attorney for Farbstein & Brown from 1984 to 1985. He is a member of the California State Bar and the Los Angeles County Bar Association. Mason earned a Juris Doctorate degree from the University of California , Davis and a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Santa Clara . This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $115,680. Mason is a Democrat.

John Messner, 63, of Folsom, has been appointed to the Public Works Contract Arbitration Committee. He has worked for the building contracting firm Harbison-Mahony-Higgins (HMH) since 1974 where he currently serves as vice president and operations manager. Messner previously held the positions of project engineer and project manager for HMH. He is a member of the Associated General Contractors of California . This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no salary. Messner is a Republican.

Bethany Mills, 30, of West Sacramento , has been appointed assistant deputy director of public affairs for the Department of General Services. She has been an account manager for the Perry Communications Group since 2006. Mills previously was a senior account executive for Randle Communications from 2004 to 2006 and a media consultant for the Automated Power Exchange in Santa Clara from 2003 to 2004. Prior to that, she was a campaign consultant for NCG Porter Novelli from 2002 to 2003. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $76,656. Mills is a Republican.

Stephen St. Marie, Ph.D., 55, of San Francisco , has been appointed advisor on policy and planning for the Public Utilities Commission (PUC). He has served in various capacities for the PUC since 2003 and currently serves as chief of staff to Commissioner John Bohn. From 2003 to 2004, St. Marie was a public utilities regulatory analyst for the PUC. Previously, he was a principal for Navigant Consulting Incorporated from 2001 to 2003 and chief economic consultant for the California Electricity Oversight Board from 2000 to 2001. Prior to that, he held several senior positions with National Economic Research Associates from 1981 to 2000. St. Marie also worked as an economist for the Bureau of Labor Statistics for 3 years. He currently serves as president of the Power Association of Northern California. St. Marie is also a member of the International Association for Energy Economics and the Western Economic Association International. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $97,128. St. Marie is a Republican.

Jay Alan Wierenga, 46, of Fair Oaks , has been appointed assistant director of communications for the Office of Homeland Security. He has served as communications director for the California Conservation Corps since March 2007. Wierenga previously was a news anchor and talk host for Newstalk 1530 KFBK from 2003 to 2007 and was a news anchor for KTXL-TV Fox 40 in Sacramento from 2000 to 2003. Prior to that, he held numerous television positions including anchor and reporter for KPHO-TV CBS 5 in Phoenix , AZ and anchor for WSET-TV in Lynchburg , VA , where he was also managing editor. Wierenga is a member of the Stanford Home for Children Advisory Board and is a former board member for Big Brothers and Big Sisters in Sacramento . This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $101,952. Wierenga is a Republican.

Jeffrey Williams, Ph.D., 54, of Palo Alto , has been appointed to the Inspection and Maintenance Review Committee. He has served on the Committee since 2002. Williams has served as the Daniel Barton DeLoach professor in the Department of Agriculture & Resource Economics at the University of California , Davis since 1997. Previously, he was an associate professor and then professor in the Food Research Institute at Stanford University from 1987 to 1998. Prior to joining the faculty at Stanford University , Williams was an assistant professor in the Department of Economics at Brandeis University from 1981 to 1987. He is a member of the American Agricultural Economics Association and the American Finance Association. This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no salary. Williams is a Republican.

Kurt Wilson, 34, of Rialto , has been appointed chief of external affairs for the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR). He has served as director of the Office of Community Safety and Violence Prevention for the City of San Bernardino since 2006. Between 1992 and 2006, Wilson served as chief operating officer for Innovation Treatment Centers (ITC) based in Rialto and also served as chief executive officer starting in 2000. Additionally, he served as teacher and principal for the Wilson School from 2001 to 2006. Wilson served on the Rialto City Council from 2000 to 2004 and during his tenure served as mayor pro tempore from 2002 to 2004. He also served as planning commissioner for the City of Rialto from 1992 to 2000. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $97,296. Wilson is a Democrat.

Daniel Zingale, 47, of Sacramento , has been appointed to the Commission on the Status of Women. He has served as chief of staff in the Office of First Lady Maria Shriver since 2005 and senior advisor to Governor Schwarzenegger since 2006. From 2003 to 2005, Zingale was a member of the Agricultural Labor Relations Board. He previously served as cabinet secretary for Governor Gray Davis in 2003. Zingale was the founding director of the Department of Managed Health Care, a department designed to promote patient rights and a more stable and solvent managed health care industry, from 2000 to 2002. He also served as chief executive officer of the AIDS Action Council and AIDS Action Foundation, a national patient advocacy organization. Prior to that, Zingale was deputy controller and chief of staff in the Office of the State Controller Gray Davis. This position requires Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Zingale is a Democrat.

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PG&E NAMED sixth top Bay Area corporate philanthropist – Donations come entirely from shareholders – Customer rates not affected

Pacific Gas and Electric Comapny (PG&E) has announced its recognition by the San Francisco Business Times as one of the Bay Area’s leading corporate philanthropists.

The San Francisco-based gas and electric company ranked sixth on the San Francisco Business Times’ list of the top 70 Bay Area corporate philanthropists, featured in the Times’ annual report on the Bay Area’s business investment status, according to PG&E.

“We’re honored to be included among this distinguished group of corporate philanthropists,” Ophelia Basgal, PG&E vice president of civic partnership and community initiatives, said.

“Collectively we demonstrate that through taking an active role in our communities and supporting organizations and initiatives that create neighborhoods with robust businesses, plentiful jobs, vibrant schools, great parks and a healthy citizenry, we can contribute to a more sustainable society,” Basgal said.

In addition to being acknowledged as one of the Bay Area’s top corporate philanthropists, this year the gas and electric company is making its largest charitable commitment in the company’s history, according to PG&E.

PG&E is donating $18.3 million to various nonprofit organizations this year, a 25 percent increase from 2006, the company said.

PG&E’s charitable contributions are generated entirely from the company’s shareholders and do not affect gas and electric rates, the company said.

Bay City News

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August 1 Videos of The Day – A TIME FOR CLOWNS – I GOT A CRUSH – IT’S IN THE EYES – Babies born today will be intuitive – Live radar and weather forecast

August 1 Videos of The Day
A TIME FOR CLOWNS

I GOT A CRUSH

IT’S IN THE EYES

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AUGUST 1 BIRTHDAY LORE
You have intuitive powers and somewhat fastidious tastes and are bold even to the point of being foolhardy. You have perseverance and through it overcome many difficulties. You are fond of outdoor sports and travel. You are gentle, affectionate, and fond of children, and love your home and family.

ADVICE FOR AUGUST 1
Observe on what day in August the first heavy fog occurs, and expect a hard frost on the same day in October.

AUGUST 1 WORD OF THE DAY
Cumulonimbus cloud. Defintion: Large, dark, vertical cloud with bulging top that brings showers, thunder, and lightning.

AUGUST 1 IN HISTORY
Colorado admitted to the Union as the 38th state, 1876. A 16-inch snow cover remained at 5,550 feet on Mount Rainier, Washington, 1954.

REALTIME SAN FRANCISCO WEATHER
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Wednesday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, cloudy through mid morning, then gradual clearing, with a high near 71. West southwest wind between 7 and 9 mph.

Wednesday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, increasing clouds, with a low around 56. Southwest wind between 5 and 9 mph.

Thursday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, cloudy through mid morning, then gradual clearing, with a high near 72. Southwest wind between 5 and 10 mph.

Thursday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 55. West southwest wind between 6 and 10 mph.

Friday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 69.

Friday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 55.

Saturday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 68.

Saturday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 54.

Sunday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 67.

Sunday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 53.

Monday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 67.

Monday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 54.

Tuesday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 71.

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PESKIN MUNI REFORM PROPOSAL goes to November ballot

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Aaron Peskin, president of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, seen presiding over July 31 2007 meeting.
PHOTO BY BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

SEE RELATED COPROPHAGOUS AARON PESKIN BLINDSIDES THE CITY

BY EMMETT BERG

Legislators in San Francisco today passed a package of reforms designed to empower and improve city municipal Transportation Agency service, despite a divided Board of Supervisors that voted 7 to 4 on the issue.

Now voters this fall will get to a chance to weigh for themselves the array of transit organizational changes when they are asked to ratify the changes to the city charter in November.

Opposed to the charter amendments were supervisors Ed Jew, Michela Alioto-Pier, Gerardo Sandoval and Jake McGoldrick.

They are apparently joined in opposition by Mayor Gavin Newsom, who late last week released a statement reversing his support.

The statement came following what Newsom said were late changes to the terms brokered by
supervisors, employee unions and city officials.

The fuss concerns language in the amendment that supposedly makes it harder for lawmakers to pass increases to downtown parking allotments, which have been sought by developers of high-rise condominiums and others in the business community.

Overall, the changes include transferring some of the functions now belonging to the city Department of Parking and Traffic to Muni, like parking rates and fees. It would abolish the Taxi Commission and fold those responsibilities into Muni. It would also remove from future supervisors’ agendas votes on stop signs placements, street curb matters and traffic
control measures.

Personnel changes would also take effect, such as increasing the number of employees serving at the pleasure of the executive director, and enshrining performance bonuses that could in part upend the seniority-based salary system that unionized employees now work under.

The agency will spend about $668 million providing service this fiscal year. The proposed charter amendment would increase by $26 million, or double the current yearly amount Muni takes in from parking taxes.

The proposed charter amendment is the largest transit overhaul since the approval by voters in 1999 of Proposition E, which created the San Francisco MTA.

The charter amendment would allow Muni for the first time to float revenue bonds and raise cash to meet agency-specific priorities. A half-cent portion of the city sales tax flows to Muni and could be useful for raising even more money.

Bay City News

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BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Bill Wilson is a veteran freelance photographer whose work is published by San Francisco and East Bay media. Bill embraced photography at the age of eight. In recent years, his photos capture historic record of the San Francisco LGBT community in the Bay Area Reporter (BAR). Bill has contributed to the Sentinel for the past three years.

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GOVERNOR ORDERS CAPITOL FLAGS HALF-STAFF in memory of CHP Officer Douglas Scott – Killed in pursuit of fleeing suspect

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Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger today released the following statement regarding the death of California Highway Patrol Officer Douglas Scott Russell of Folsom, CA:

“Today, Californians mourn the loss of Officer Russell who gave his life in the line of duty while protecting his fellow citizens. Our law enforcement officers deserve our utmost respect and gratitude for the sacrifices they make every day to ensure our safety. The loss of one of our brave officers is a tremendous tragedy that weighs heavily on the hearts of all Californians. Maria and I express our deepest sympathies to the family of Officer Russell and will pray for their comfort during this difficult time.”

Russell, 46, died July 31 as a result of injuries sustained while attempting to stop a fleeing suspect during a pursuit on eastbound Highway 50. He was a member of the California Highway Patrol for 22 years. Officer Russell is survived by his wife Lynn.

In honor of Officer Russell, Capitol flags will be flown at half-staff.

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SAN FRANCISCO FIRE DEPARTMENT RECEIVES NEW RESCUE DEVICE FOR FIREBOAT

HIGH-TECH CAMERA TO SCAN WATER, HELP FIND VICTIMS AT NIGHT

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San Francisco Fire Chief Joanne Hayes-White

It has quickly become one of the most important pieces of equipment any fire department can have, and now one of San Francisco’s Fireboats will receive one of the most modern, high-tech versions.

Gallagher-Tarantino, a division of Arthur J. Gallagher and Co., and Fireman’s Fund Insurance Company are giving $9,971 to the San Francisco Fire Department for the purchase of a new thermal imaging camera.

The heat-sensitive camera, typically used by Firefighters to search for victims and hidden fire inside smoke-filled buildings, will now be utilized during water rescue and recovery efforts. The camera uses updated technology to “see” through darkness and fog to quickly locate anyone in the water, trapped on a boat, or on a pier.

“Thermal imaging cameras are invaluable tools that significantly improve the delivery of service to our community,” said Fire Chief Joanne Hayes-White.

“Our fireboats have a unique responsibility to protect our city along the waterfront and this gift will have a huge impact in our search and rescue efforts.”

Chief Hayes-White, San Francisco Firefighters, and executives from Gallagher-Tarantino and Fireman’s Fund will come together for a public recognition event where the new camera will be presented and demonstrated.

Date and Time: Location:
Thursday, August 2, 2007 McCovey Cove
10:00 AM Ferry Pier behind AT&T Park

“We can’t think of a better way to support our Firefighters in this area,” said Don Tarantino, area President of Gallagher-Tarantino. “These cameras are reliable tools for saving lives and we’re proud to help San Francisco utilize one in this innovative way.”

The donation is part of a nationwide program called Fireman’s Fund Heritage which is funded by Fireman’s Fund Insurance Company. The program is designed to provide needed equipment, training and educational tools to local fire departments. Since 2004, Fireman’s Fund has given more than $13 million to hundreds of different departments. Independent insurance agencies that sell Fireman’s Fund products are able to direct these donations to support fire stations in their communities. Gallagher-Tarantino was instrumental in directing this specific gift to San Francisco.

About Arthur J. Gallagher
Celebrating its 80th anniversary, Arthur J. Gallagher provides a full range of property/casualty and employee benefits products and services to clients of all sizes. For more information, visit ajg.com.

About Fireman’s Fund
Founded in 1863, Fireman’s Fund Insurance Company is a premier property and casualty insurance company providing personal, commercial and specialty insurance products nationwide. Fireman’s Fund is a member of the Allianz Group (NYSE:AZ), one of the world’s largest providers of insurance and other financial services. For more information, visit firemansfund.com.

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STEVE YOUNG AND JERRY RICE REMEMBER BILL WALSH

“We will never forget our coach who took the 49ers to the highest pinnacle of achievement three times in the 1980s, earning the franchise and its talented coach the recognition they deserved.”San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom

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Steve Young and Jerry Rice entered the Stanford University auditorium quietly Monday afternoon, both men appearing to brace themselves with arms held tightly across their chests, waiting for the news conference announcing the death of Bill Walsh to begin.

But both men began to relax as they shared memories of the Hall of Fame coach.

Bill Walsh deserves to be mentioned in the same category at the other great innovators and leaders that have clustered in the South Bay over the past three decades, Young said.

“When you mention Steve Jobs or Andy Grove you have to mention Bill Walsh,” Young said.

“He was doing the same things only in a different venue.”

Walsh died at home in Woodside Monday morning and was receiving visitors as recently as Sunday when former Stanford football coach Tyrone Willingham and Stanford donor John Arrillaga saw him.

Oakland Raiders owner Al Davis and former Raiders coach and current NFL broadcaster John Madden saw him on Saturday. Joe Montana and Ronnie Lott saw Walsh on Wednesday and Montana saw Walsh again on Friday, according to Walsh family spokesman Kirk Reynolds.

Rice said he was always grateful for Walsh taking a big chance by drafting him out of a small, historically black college in Mississippi.

“I came to San Francisco and I found another father: Bill Walsh,” Rice said.

Young, Rice, former 49er Keena Turner, former 49ers assistant coach Bill McPherson, Stanford University Athletic Director Bob Bowlsby and Stanford football coach Jim Harbaugh all agreed that Walsh should be remembered as a teacher as much as a coach.

“At his core, Bill was a teacher,” Turner said.

“He loved to be… able to see the future of a person,” Young said.

“He knew me well before I knew myself.”

Walsh talked about wanting to stay in the Bay Area and coach at his first meeting with then 49ers owner Eddie DeBartolo before DeBartolo hired him in 1979.

“The most important thing that was in his mind was his love for the Bay Area, his home,” DeBartolo said in a conference call.

Stanford has already begun a Bill Walsh Leadership Program for student athletes and coaches to honor Walsh. There will likely be an additional honor for Walsh on the campus, according to Bowlsby.

“I also expect there’s going to be some sort of physical memory, likely around the football field,” Bowlsby said.

On behalf of San Francisco, Mayor Gavin Newsom described Walsh as one of the greatest coaches in history and pledged the City would never forget Coach Walsh.

“It is with great sorrow that we mark the passing of one of the greatest football coaches in the history of the sport and one of San Francisco’s true legends,” Newsom stated.

“Bill Walsh will forever be remembered as the father of the West Coast offense, the architect of one of the winningest football franchises in NFL history, and a master motivator who took the raw components of talent and fashioned them into success through organization, vision, and will.

“We will never forget our coach who took the 49ers to the highest pinnacle of achievement three times in the 1980s, earning the franchise and its talented coach the recognition they deserved.

“His legacy will live on through the hundreds of NFL players and coaches he inspired, as well as millions of fans of the game. Although I am saddened by his passing, I would like to mark this day by remembering and honoring his great accomplishments and contributions to the sport of professional football and our city.

“Tomorrow I will issue a proclamation declaring July 31, 2007 Bill Walsh Day in San Francisco. Our flag at City Hall will be flown at half-mast in his honor.”

Walsh did not become an NFL head coach until he was 47, but turned the 49ers into a 1980s success story and left an indelible mark on American football.

His teams won the Super Bowl in 1982, 1985 and 1989, and he was named NFL coach of the year in 1981 and 1984.

Many of his former assistants went on to lead their own teams, handing down his methods and schemes to dozens more coaches.

Under Walsh, the 49ers drafted quarterback Joe Montana, wide receiver Jerry Rice and safety Ronnie Lott – all among the greatest players ever to play at their respective positions.

“For me personally, outside of my dad he was probably the most influential person in my life. I am going to miss him,” Montana said in a statement.

Walsh went 102-63 with one tie with the 49ers, winning 10 of his 14 post-season games along with six division titles.

He also helped to establish the World League of American Football – what was NFL Europe – in 1994.

Walsh was diagnosed with leukemia in 2004 and underwent months of treatment and blood transfusions.

He publicly disclosed his illness in November 2006, but appeared at a tribute for retired receiver Jerry Rice two weeks later.

Bay City News and Pat Murphy contributed to this report

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ISRAEL BACKS U.S. ARMS PLAN as bid to contain Iran

BY LESLIE SUSSER

JERUSALEM — In stark contrast to the past, when Israel and its American allies in Washington vehemently opposed arms sales to Saudi Arabia, Jerusalem appears to be on board with a new Bush administration plan to sells billions of dollars of weapons to the Saudis.
The reason for the change of heart? Iran.

With the threat of Iran looming ever larger, both the United States and Israel are taking steps to increase the military might capable of countering Iran and its radical forces in the region.

The United States intends to increase military aid to its allies in the Middle East to the tune of around $60 billion over the coming decade. Most of the American weapons would go to Saudi Arabia, Egypt and Israel.

At the same time, Israel plans to dramatically increase its own defense budget by more than $11 billion during the same period. The changes Israel intends to make in the Israel Defense Forces with the bigger budgets are said to be the most far-reaching in years. Defense Minister Ehud Barak has redefined the threats Israel is facing and wants to restructure the armed forces accordingly.

On Sunday, the government approved a hike of 46 billion shekels — or $10.6 billion — in defense spending over the next 10 years, but it postponed a vote on an additional 7 billion shekels — or $1.6 billion — that Barak wants for 2008.

Under President Bush’s plan, American military aid to Israel over the next decade would increase from $26 billion to $30 billion. Israel wants to use part of this to purchase state-of-the-art American warplanes, F-35 fighters and the F-22 stealth bomber, which to date the United States has not sold to any other country.

In the same period, Egypt would receive $13 billion in military aid under the Bush administration plan. That aid would keep Egypt at its current levels despite some moves in Washington to reduce it.

The most dramatic departure for the Americans, though, would be a $20 billion arms sale to the Gulf countries, mostly to Saudi Arabia.

Some U.S. legislators oppose the sale because, they say, the Saudis are allowing Sunni militants in the kingdom to attack U.S. forces in Iraq and are afraid to intervene, fearing the militants might turn on them. U.S. officials say the administration will insist that the Saudis clamp down on this kind of terror and show a higher profile in peace overtures toward Israel, including a committment to attend the regional peace conference the United States is planning for September.

Despite intense Israeli opposition to arms sales to Saudi Arabia in the past, most notably in the mid-1980s, Prime Minister Ehud Olmert fully accepts the argument that the arms are part of a major U.S. effort to counter Iran’s hegemonic regional ambitions.

Iran is a primary backer of Hamas and Hezbollah, terrorist groups that sit on Israel’s southern and northern borders. Iran has also made moves in recent months to keep Syria in its orbit and prevent Saudi Arabia from playing an active role in the latest American-sponsored Middle East peacemaking initiative.

The Saudi arms deal was one of the key issues Olmert discussed with Bush during a June visit to Washington. Bush assured the Israeli leader that the Saudis would not be given any weapons Israel doesn’t have, and that they would not be allowed to deploy systems close enough to the border to put Israeli targets in range.

The clincher for Olmert, though, according to diplomatic sources, was the corresponding increase offered by the president in military aid to Israel. This and the promise of super-sophisticated weaponry will help the United States keep its commitment to maintain Israel’s technological edge over any of its potential enemies.

Still, the Israeli right has offered some muted criticism of the U.S.-Saudi deal. Former Gen. Yossi Peled, the Likud Party candidate for defense minister, warned that in the event of a radical takeover in Saudi Arabia, the arms — which include precision munitions — could be turned on Israel.

Israeli government spokesmen counter that even if that were to happen, Israel would have the wherewithal to deal with whatever military problems it posed.

Due to the multiple threats Israel is facing in the region, Barak wants a significant increase in the size of the land army. He says he wants to create two more ground divisions, which would enable an overwhelming IDF response on any front, presumably even against the Saudis, if things were to go wrong in the kingdom.

In analyzing the shortcomings revealed in last summer’s Lebanon war and the evolving “threat map,” which includes heightened missile threats from Iran, Syria, Hezbollah and Hamas and the possibility of full-scale war on more than one front, Barak has come up with five major priorities:

* The development of “multilayered” anti-missile defenses. This means putting in place a combination of anti-missile systems to deal with missiles of all sizes and ranges, and within five to seven years making Israeli air space virtually impregnable.

* To restore Israel’s famed capacity for ground maneuver on enemy territory through intensive training and the creation of the two new divisions.

* So-called “logistic breathing space,” which means making sure emergency stores are at capacity.

* Training and providing budgets for large-scale exercises involving brigades and divisions.

* Building up Israel’s capacity to strike targets thousands of miles away.

Barak told the Cabinet on Sunday that providing funds for all these ambitious projects was the only way to guarantee “decisive victory” in any future war. His budgetary demands coincided with an intensive review of Israeli military spending conducted by a committee under the former Treasury director-general, David Brodet. The committee made dozens of recommendations for economizing in the defense establishment, but also proposed significant increases in overall defense spending.

The thinking is that savings on the non-essentials together with the increases will provide huge sums for investment in strengthening the IDF.

The IDF has already carried out some of Barak’s reforms. The emergency supplies, found wanting during the Lebanon war, have largely been replenished. Huge land exercises have been carried out at divisional levels and major reforms in the training of troops have been introduced.

But Israel needs to be ready for more than a repeat of last summer’s war. At the very least, it has to take into account the possibility of simultaneous hostilities from Gaza, Lebanon, Syria and Iran.

With this in mind, will there be funds for the rest of the ambitious reforms Barak has in mind? And if they are carried out, where will they leave the IDF vis-a-vis the new “threat map” — especially the multiple threats emanating from Tehran?

Global News Service of The Jewish People

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NEWSOM ASKS VOTERS to restore Small Business Center staff salaries eliminated by Board of Supervisors

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Mayor Newsom Monday announced funding for San Francisco Business Center salaries cut by the San Francisco Board of Supervisors will be sought by voter approval in the November election. Scott Hauge, left, founder of Small Business California and named 2007 Small Business Advocate of the Year, noted small business slow 20-year rise to City assisance. Small Business Commission President Michael O’Connor reported the commission labored for Center establishment.
PHOTOS BY DAVID TOERGE
Sentinel Photography Editor
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

BY PAT MURPHY
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

Although the San Francisco Board of Supervisors approved funding to establish a San Francisco Small Business Center in this year’s budget, the body cut $500,000 proposed by Mayor Newsom — necessary to pay five staffers for pro-active advocacy.

Newsom acted on mayoral authority to restore those funds Monday through voter approval on the November ballot.

Longtime small business leaders gathered for the celebratory announcement within SFParty.com, hosted by owner Dan Cerf with free popcorn and lemonade for all.

“This came together out of the frustration and the angst of small business owners” due to Board salaries elimination, Newsom stated.

“I will help support your efforts to get the kind of support you need.”

City tax revenues accruing from increase small business success will outweigh City costs to pay center staff, continued Newsom.

“It’s going to pale in contrast to increased City revenues,” Newsom projected.

The center, opening in January 2008 with sufficient staff if approved by voters, will serve as a one-stop location for current small business owners and prospective owners.

A case manager will be assigned to each client in obtaining business permits, grants, Enterprise Zone benefits and other services, explained Jennifer Matz, deputy director of the Economic and Workforce Development Department.

In addition to pro-active client advocacy with other City departments, the Newsom Administration will conduct annual review of case management success, said Wade Crowfoot, Deputy Chief of Staff to Mayor Newsom.

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PAT MURPHY
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
In his youth, Pat Murphy worked as a General Assignment reporter for the Richmond Independent, the Berkeley Daily Gazette, and the San Francisco Chronicle. He served as Managing Editor of the St. Albans (Vermont) Daily Messenger at age 21. Murphy also launched ValPak couponing in San Francisco, as the company’s first San Francisco franchise owner. He walked the bricks, developing ad strategy for a broad range of restaurants and merchants. Pat knows what works and what doesn’t work. His writing skill has been employed by marketing agencies, including Don Solem & Associates. He has covered San Francisco governance for the past ten years. Pat scribes an offbeat view of the human family through Believe It or What.

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DAVID TOERGE
Sentinel Photography Editor
When David Toerge left a career in photojournalism that had spanned over twelve years and started in a new direction of commercial photography he blended the editorial style with a more corporate look. David led the way in that new style garnering many awards for his work. Communications Arts has honored him over six times. Based in San Francisco, David shoots projects on location all over the US for various corporations and a multitude of magazines and always brings back great images. He has a keen sense of light, color, and composition and delivers to his clients assignments done with passion. He has climbed bridges hundreds of feet in the air, shot in caves hundreds of feet below, dived with sharks and driven the track with Indy drivers. He has shot earthquakes and firestorms but loves walking the streets with his camera just photographing the everyday life of his city.

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GIFTS GALORE but crowds not

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The 2007 San Francisco Gift Show was sparsely attended this year and will close Wednesday
PHOTOS BY DAVID TOERGE
Sentinel Photography Editor
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

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Mark Sewall,from Shehadi Mirrors had a very multi-faceted trip to San Francisco but didn’t sell too many mirrors at the Gift Show. He hope that the phone orders will come.

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Mark Weisberg owner of Fliptomania said that his business of flipbooks did a brisk business yesterday

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DAVID TOERGE
Sentinel Photography Editor
When David Toerge left a career in photojournalism that had spanned over twelve years and started in a new direction of commercial photography he blended the editorial style with a more corporate look. David led the way in that new style garnering many awards for his work. Communications Arts has honored him over six times. Based in San Francisco, David shoots projects on location all over the US for various corporations and a multitude of magazines and always brings back great images. He has a keen sense of light, color, and composition and delivers to his clients assignments done with passion. He has climbed bridges hundreds of feet in the air, shot in caves hundreds of feet below, dived with sharks and driven the track with Indy drivers. He has shot earthquakes and firestorms but loves walking the streets with his camera just photographing the everyday life of his city.

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CASTRO THEATRE CELEBRATES 85th ANNIVERSARY, AUGUST 10TH – 12TH

Hollywood’s VIP List includes Jeanette MacDonald, Clark Gable, Vivien Leigh, Laurel & Hardy, and Lon Chaney

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By Seán Martinfield
Sentinel Fine Arts Critic
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

Beginning Friday, August 10th through Sunday, August 12thSan Francisco’s Landmark neighborhood movie palace – the Castro Theatre – celebrates its 85th Anniversary. The party theme is, “Diverse Programming For A Diverse Audience.”

Starting at 8:00 pm, headlining a live music show is Hawaiian superstar and Grammy nominee Amy Hanaiali’i Gilliom. Affectionately dubbed as “Hawaii’s Ambassador of Music”, Amy will present traditional songs from Hawaii along with new, rarely performed songs from the pop and jazz canons. Carol Channing says says Amy has a voice that “dazzles like diamonds”.

Also on the program, following in the footsteps of the Nasser Brothers theatrical family, will be Monique Argent. Ms Argent will be performing the classic Hollywood songs spanning the many decades of programming at the Castro Theatre.

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AMY HANAIALI’I GILLIOM and MONIQUE ARGENT

Tickets on sale now at: CITY BOX OFFICE
All seats reserved. Orchestra – $45; Balcony – $35. Group rates available for 10 persons or more. Portion of the evening proceeds will go to ASIAN AND PACIFIC ISLANDER WELLNESS CENTER.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 11TH
11:00 am – Laurel & Hardy in WAY OUT WEST and a BUGS BUNNY CARTOON CARNIVAL.
When’s the last time you went to the movies for a Quarter? Yes, all seats for this performance will be only 25 cents, the same price when the Castro Theatre opened in 1922!

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LAUREL & HARDY share the spotlight with BUGS BUNNY

2:00 pmA Sing-along WIZARD OF OZ. Hosts Laurie Bushman and Joe Collins will introduce the films and encourage audience participation. Goodie-Bags will be provided to enhance your experience of singing along with Judy Garland and the cast of this unforgettable movie. Extra added treat – Monique Argent will sing “Over the Rainbow” and other songs before the film.
Adults – $15 Children & Seniors 62 & over- $10

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THE WIZARD OF OZ – A Sing-Along at the Castro Theatre

7:00 PM – A true “Only in San Francisco” evening.
SAN FRANCISCO (MGM, 1936) Starring Jeanette MacDonald, Clark Gable, and Spencer Tracy.

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JEANETTE MacDONALD and GLARK GABLE – in SAN FRANCISCO

If you have never seen this film on the big screen – now’s your chance! Featuring the 1906 Earthquake and Fire and The City’s Anthem – Jeanette MacDonald just stands in the ruins and sings! The film will be followed by music from the Barbary Coast Jazz Ensemble. Save room for Anniversary Cake in the lobby during intermission and before – Humphrey Bogart in THE MALTESE FALCON. Regular Castro Theatre admission prices.

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HUMPHREY BOGART & JOHN’S GRILL

SUNDAY, AUGUST 12TH
12:00 Noon – A Masterpiece never to be re-produced again. First showing in San Francisco three years!
GONE WITH THE WIND (MGM, 1939). Margaret Mitchell’s tale of love among the ruins of the Civil War. Regular Castro Theatre admission prices apply.

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VIVIEN LEIGH – Gone With The Wind

7:00 pm – The Castro Theatre’s own Warren Lubich on the Mighty Wurlitzer will accompany one of the greatest classics from the silent era. PHANTOM OF THE OPERA – starring Lon Chaney in his most famous role. Also included, a raucous Laurel & Hardy short, BIG BUSINESS. Regular Castro Theatre admission prices apply.

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LON CHANEY – The Phantom at the Castro

To order tickets on-line: CASTRO THEATRE – Tickets

For your dining pleasure, Seán recommends – where else?JOHN’S GRILL.
Order the specialty house drink, the “Bloody Brigid”. Named By the California Historical Society, it is a seductive blend of sweet & sour, vodka, soda, special mix, lime and grenadine, served over crushed ice, complete with souvenir glass. And to really set the mood, order the Oysters Wellington – zipped up in puff pastry, laved in creamed spinach and smoked bacon, very comfy on a bed of sherry cream.
To make on-line reservations: JOHN’S GRILL – Reservations

See Seán’s recent articles:
THE BIG VOICE: God or Merman?
HELP IS ON THE WAY XIII GOES TO THE MOVIES
HOTEL CASABLANCA – World Premiere in San Francisco
NEIL SEDAKA and PATTI LuPONE – This Week In San Francisco
JOHNNY MATHIS – Gets Misty with San Francisco Symphony
INSIGNIFICANT OTHERS – A Conversation with Composer Jay Kuo
NORMA SHEARER Flick Opens the San Francisco Silent Film Festival
JERSEY BOYS – Earth Angels invade Curran Theatre! Cast #2: Their Eyes Adore You!
IPHIGÉNIE EN TAURIDE – Everything old is new again at SF Opera
JEANETTE MacDONALD – First Lady of “San Francisco”

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San Francisco Sentinel’s Fine Arts Critic Seán Martinfield is a native San Franciscan. He is a Theatre Arts Graduate from San Francisco State University, a professional singer, and well-known private vocal coach to Bay Area actors and singers of all ages and persuasions. His clients have appeared in Broadway National Tours including Wicked, Aïda, Miss Saigon, Rent, Bye Bye Birdie, in theatres and cabarets throughout the Bay Area, and are regularly featured in major City events including Diva Fest, Gay Pride, and Halloween In The Castro. As an Internet consultant in vocal development and audition preparation he has published thousands of responses to those seeking his advice concerning singing techniques, professional and academic auditions, and careers in the Performing Arts. Ask him a question on AllExperts.com . If you would like to build up your vocal performance chops and participate in the Bay Area’s rich theatrical scene, e-mail him at: seanmartinfield@att.net.

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July 31 Videos of The Day – AUGUST 1940 SAN FRANCISCO – BUNNY EYES IN THE CORPSE – LET’S TALK – July 31 Photos of The Day – IN CELEBRATION OF DORE CALLEY – Babies born today should choose mate carefully – Live radar and weather forecast

July 31 Videos of The Day
AUGUST 1940 SAN FRANCISCO

BUNNY EYES IN THE CORPSE

LET’S TALK

July 31 Photos of The Day
IN CELEBRATION OF DORE ALLEY
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A participant at Sunday’s Dore Alley party wags his stuff.
PHOTOS BY BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

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JULY 31 BIRTHDAY LORE
You are cautious, careful, and a good planner, and have a fair amount of executive ability. Because of your keen foresight and good judgment, many seek your advice and profit by it. You are frank and honest in your judgment of others. Take care in the selection of your mate and do not marry in haste.

ADVICE FOR JULY 31
Pick beans when pods just reveal the beans inside.

JULY 31 WORD OF THE DAY
Halcyon Days. Defintion: About 14 days of calm weather follows the blustery winds of autumn’s end. The ancient Greeks and Romans believed them to occur around the time of the winter solstice, when the halcyon, or kingfisher, was brooding. In a nest floating on the sea, the bird was said to have charmed the wind and waves so that the waters were especially calm during this period.

JULY 31 IN HISTORY
George Washington signed the first United States Patent Grant to Samuel Hopkins of Pittsford, Vermont, for a new method of making Potash, 1790. Hail fell 12 inches deep in Scituate, Massachusetts, remaining on the ground for 30 hours, 1769.

REALTIME SAN FRANCISCO WEATHER
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Tuesday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, cloudy, then gradually becoming partly sunny, with a high near 69. Southwest wind between 7 and 9 mph.

Tuesday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, increasing clouds, with a low around 54. Southwest wind between 7 and 9 mph.

Wednesday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, cloudy through mid morning, then gradual clearing, with a high near 71. Southwest wind between 7 and 9 mph.

Wednesday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 55. Southwest wind between 6 and 9 mph.

Thursday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 70.

Thursday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 55.

Friday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a high near 69.

Friday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 54.

Saturday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a high near 69.

Saturday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 55.

Sunday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a high near 68.

Sunday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 54.

Monday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a high near 69.

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BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Bill Wilson is a veteran freelance photographer whose work is published by San Francisco and Bay Area media. Bill embraced photography at the age of eight. In recent years, his photos capture historic record of the San Francisco LGBT community in the Bay Area Reporter (BAR). Bill has contributed to the Sentinel for the past three years.

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HUNTERS POINT SHIPYARD DEVELOPMENT site levelling nears completion

Construction crews working at Hunters Point Shipyard are near completion of their work in leveling the site and making it suitable for the construction of 1,500 homes.

The infrastructure phase of the project is set to begin in the coming weeks with the installation of storm, sewer, water, electrical and gas systems and construction of sidewalks and roadways.

“Residents will now watch this new neighborhood literally take shape,” said Kofi Bonner, President of Lennar Urban’s Bay Area Division. “This is an exciting time for our project and for all of southeast San Francisco.”

The Shipyard construction site is the most heavily regulated in the state of California with a variety of procedures in place to ensure safe working conditions and minimal construction dust.

Those efforts include:

Redesigning grading to minimize disturbance of site soil.
Increased air monitoring.
Continuous watering of the site.
Reducing speeds for trucks and heavy equipment.
Road cleaning and sweeping.
As an additional measure during the last stages of grading, construction crews installed a dust containment fence to keep soil from migrating off site.

Air quality at the site has been deemed safe, and in some cases superior to other parts of San Francisco, by the federal Centers for Disease Control and the San Francisco Department of Public Health.

For more information, please visit hunterspointcommunity.com.

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POSTAL INSPECTOR TESTIFIES only junk mail delivered to Ed Jew San Francisco address

BY ANANDA SHOREY

Only advertisements are regularly delivered to San Francisco supervisor Ed Jew’s Sunset District residence, a U.S. Postal Service inspector testified today during a preliminary hearing into Jew’s alleged violations of the city’s elections code.

In the second day of testimony, two letter carriers that regularly deliver mail to Jew’s Sunset District home and his Burlingame home said the supervisor regularly received third-class mail — or junk mail — at his San Francisco home, while both first- and third-class mail were delivered to his Burlingame home.

“The mail would pile up for a week or two before someone would pick it up,” postal Inspector Quan Howard testified in San Francisco Superior Court today.

Jew has pleaded not guilty to nine felony charges related to alleged violations of the city elections code. Prosecutors question whether he lives inside the district he represents and whether he misrepresented his residence in candidate nominating documents.

The type of mail Jew received at his various homes proves nothing, said his attorney, Bill Fazio.

“The junk mail is more indicative that he lived there. The mail was in the name of Ed Jew.”

Mail carrier Gregory Tanazawa, who had been delivering mail at Jew’s San Francisco address for two years, once told Howard that it didn’t appear anyone lived in the home, Howard said today.

The defense is not trying to prove Jew spent all of his time at the Sunset District home, Fazio said.

“We’re not saying there was a timecard that he punched in and out,” Fazio said.

Jew has reportedly been present at his Sunset District home, located at 2450 28th Ave., intermittently since around 1984.

To trace Jew’s residency history, Assistant District Attorney Evan Ackiron presented insurance, mortgage, California Department of Motor Vehicle and voting records, as well as garbage and water bills today to try to persuade Judge Harold Kahn that there is probable cause that Jew’s primary home is not in San Francisco.

The documents showed that there wasn’t garbage service at times and that numerous registered voters had the 28th Avenue residence listed as their home.

Fazio said there are holes in the evidence and that he will prove Jew’s primary residence is at his Sunset District home.

“His business is here; his heart is here; his whole soul is here,” Fazio said.

Jew is the subject of a separate FBI probe into his alleged acceptance of $40,000 in cash from a group of businessmen having permit problems. Jew denies wrongdoing and no federal charges have been filed.

Supporters for the District 4 supervisor lined up outside court before testimony began a little after 10 a.m. today holding signs and passing around petitions. A smiling Jew has chatted with supporters at his previous court appearances, but today his demeanor was more serious and he didn’t spend much time talking.

The preliminary hearing is expected to last up to two more days.

At its conclusion, Kahn will rule on whether there is enough evidence for Jew to stand trial.

Bay City News

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STEVE YOUNG AND JERRY RICE REMEMBER BILL WALSH

“We will never forget our coach who took the 49ers to the highest pinnacle of achievement three times in the 1980s, earning the franchise and its talented coach the recognition they deserved.”San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom

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Steve Young and Jerry Rice entered the Stanford University auditorium quietly Monday afternoon, both men appearing to brace themselves with arms held tightly across their chests, waiting for the news conference announcing the death of Bill Walsh to begin.

But both men began to relax as they shared memories of the Hall of Fame coach.

Bill Walsh deserves to be mentioned in the same category at the other great innovators and leaders that have clustered in the South Bay over the past three decades, Young said.

“When you mention Steve Jobs or Andy Grove you have to mention Bill Walsh,” Young said.

“He was doing the same things only in a different venue.”

Walsh died at home in Woodside Monday morning and was receiving visitors as recently as Sunday when former Stanford football coach Tyrone Willingham and Stanford donor John Arrillaga saw him.

Oakland Raiders owner Al Davis and former Raiders coach and current NFL broadcaster John Madden saw him on Saturday. Joe Montana and Ronnie Lott saw Walsh on Wednesday and Montana saw Walsh again on Friday, according to Walsh family spokesman Kirk Reynolds.

Rice said he was always grateful for Walsh taking a big chance by drafting him out of a small, historically black college in Mississippi.

“I came to San Francisco and I found another father: Bill Walsh,” Rice said.

Young, Rice, former 49er Keena Turner, former 49ers assistant coach Bill McPherson, Stanford University Athletic Director Bob Bowlsby and Stanford football coach Jim Harbaugh all agreed that Walsh should be remembered as a teacher as much as a coach.

“At his core, Bill was a teacher,” Turner said.

“He loved to be… able to see the future of a person,” Young said.

“He knew me well before I knew myself.”

Walsh talked about wanting to stay in the Bay Area and coach at his first meeting with then 49ers owner Eddie DeBartolo before DeBartolo hired him in 1979.

“The most important thing that was in his mind was his love for the Bay Area, his home,” DeBartolo said in a conference call.

Stanford has already begun a Bill Walsh Leadership Program for student athletes and coaches to honor Walsh. There will likely be an additional honor for Walsh on the campus, according to Bowlsby.

“I also expect there’s going to be some sort of physical memory, likely around the football field,” Bowlsby said.

On behalf of San Francisco, Mayor Gavin Newsom described Walsh as one of the greatest coaches in history and pledged the City would never forget Coach Walsh.

“It is with great sorrow that we mark the passing of one of the greatest football coaches in the history of the sport and one of San Francisco’s true legends,” Newsom stated.

“Bill Walsh will forever be remembered as the father of the West Coast offense, the architect of one of the winningest football franchises in NFL history, and a master motivator who took the raw components of talent and fashioned them into success through organization, vision, and will.

“We will never forget our coach who took the 49ers to the highest pinnacle of achievement three times in the 1980s, earning the franchise and its talented coach the recognition they deserved.

“His legacy will live on through the hundreds of NFL players and coaches he inspired, as well as millions of fans of the game. Although I am saddened by his passing, I would like to mark this day by remembering and honoring his great accomplishments and contributions to the sport of professional football and our city.

“Tomorrow I will issue a proclamation declaring July 31, 2007 Bill Walsh Day in San Francisco. Our flag at City Hall will be flown at half-mast in his honor.”

Walsh did not become an NFL head coach until he was 47, but turned the 49ers into a 1980s success story and left an indelible mark on American football.

His teams won the Super Bowl in 1982, 1985 and 1989, and he was named NFL coach of the year in 1981 and 1984.

Many of his former assistants went on to lead their own teams, handing down his methods and schemes to dozens more coaches.

Under Walsh, the 49ers drafted quarterback Joe Montana, wide receiver Jerry Rice and safety Ronnie Lott – all among the greatest players ever to play at their respective positions.

“For me personally, outside of my dad he was probably the most influential person in my life. I am going to miss him,” Montana said in a statement.

Walsh went 102-63 with one tie with the 49ers, winning 10 of his 14 post-season games along with six division titles.

He also helped to establish the World League of American Football – what was NFL Europe – in 1994.

Walsh was diagnosed with leukemia in 2004 and underwent months of treatment and blood transfusions.

He publicly disclosed his illness in November 2006, but appeared at a tribute for retired receiver Jerry Rice two weeks later.

Bay City News and Pat Murphy contributed to this report

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STATE HEALTH WARNING: Fresh ginger imported from China found to contain hazardous pesticide

The California Department of Public Health has issued a warning against the consumption of fresh ginger imported from China, after certain batches were found to contain traces of hazardous pesticide, the department reported Sunday.

A pesticide know as aldicarb sulfoxide was found in the ginger, which if consumed may cause temporary poisoning in humans, likely to occur within the first hour following exposure.

Ingestion of foods contaminated with low levels of aldicarb may cause flu-like symptoms (nausea, headache, blurred vision), which disappear quickly, usually within five or six hours, according to the CDPH.

However, at higher levels of ingestion, aldicarb contaminated food can also cause dizziness, salivation, excessive sweating, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle stiffness and twitching, and difficulty in breathing.

Ginger imported from China is currently being traced so that stores carrying the product may notify customers.

So far, the ginger is known to have been distributed at Albertson’s stores and Save Mart stores in Northern California by Christopher Ranch of Gilroy.

There have been no reports of illness as a result of consumption of the imported ginger. Individuals who may have consumed the ginger and are experiencing adverse health effects should contact their health care providers immediately, according to the CDPH.

Bay City News

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HELP IS ON THE WAY XIII GOES TO THE MOVIES

The Richmond / Ermet Aids Foundation Presents Northern California’s Largest Annual Star-Studded Gala Concert

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By Seán Martinfield
Sentinel Fine Arts Critic
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

Coming Sunday, August 5th, the 13th Annual HELP IS ON THE WAY. This year’s event takes place at the Palace of Fine Arts. The five Bay Area AIDS service organizations selected as beneficiaries include: Aguilas, AIDS Legal Referral Panel, Maitri, STOP AIDS Project, and Vital Life Services, Oakland. Presented by the THE RICHMOND / ERMET AIDS FOUNDATION, this year’s special guest performers include Bd Wong, Lucy Lawless, Marissa Jaret Winokur, Jai Rodriguez, Raul Esparza, and Joey Mcintyre.

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BD WONG and LUCY LAWLESS

This year’s all-star benefit concert features celebrities from Broadway, TV and Film to American Idol stars. It’s jazz, pop and live performance up close and personal from some of your favorite performers:

SUSAN ANTON: Broadway (Will Rogers Follies) / TV (Baywatch) / film star
MARY JO CATLETT: Broadway (Hello Dolly!, Pajama Game) TV star
CONNIE CHAMPAGNE: Cabaret star / actress
CAROLE COOK: Broadway (42nd Street, Radio Gals) star

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SUSAN ANTON and JOEY McINTYRE

RAUL ESPARZA: 2 time Tony nominated Broadway star (Company/Taboo/Cabaret)
JASON GRAAE: Broadway (Falsettos, A Grand Night for Singing) / TV / film star
LUCY LAWLESS: TV (Xena: Warrior Princess, Battlestar Galactica, Celebrity Duets) star
KIMBERLEY LOCK: American Idol / recording star
SARAH LOWE: Singer / actress (Mamma Mia, Pippin, Evita) / tap dancer
JOEY McINTYRE: Broadway (Wicked) / TV (Dancing With the Stars) / recording star

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JASON GRAAE and MARY JO CATLETT

VALARIE PETTIFORD: Broadway (Fosse/Sophisticated Ladies) /TV star
JAI RODRIGUEZ: Broadway (Rent) / TV (Queer Eye/Celebrity Duets) star
ANDREW SAMONSKY: Broadway (One the Road) TV (Guiding Light) star
BRUCE VILANCH: Comedian / Television (Hollywood Squares) / B’way (Hairspray) star

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PAULETTE IVORY and CONNIE CHAMPAGNE

PAULA WEST: Jazz / recording star
MARISSA JARET WINOKUR: Broadway (Hairspray, Grease) /TV (Stacked) / Film star
B.D. WONG: Broadway (M.Butterfly, Pacific Overtures) / TV (Oz, Law & Order: SVU) star
CATE CAPLIN & GARY FRANCO: International ballroom dance champions
JERSEY BOYS: Cast members from the San Francisco cast of the hit Broadway show

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Jarrod Specter and Michael Ingersoll – from JERSEY BOYS

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Jeremy Kushnier and Drew Gehling – from JERSEY BOYS

Sunday, August 5 at the Palace Of Fine Arts, 3301 Lyon St. in San Francisco.
VIP Underwriter Reception and extensive Silent Auction 5:00 – 6:00 pm.
Pre-show Gala Reception: 6:00 – 7:30 pm featuring complimentary hors d’oeuvres, wine tastings and martini & margarita bars
Concert 7:30 – 9:30 pm.
Dessert & Wine Party with the cast 9:30 – 11:45 pm.
Gala Pre-Concert Reception & Performance – Tickets $175.
General Reserved Seating – Performance only – Tickets $75.
Doors open for the general public at 7:00 pm.

For Tickets call – 415-273-1620
To order tickets on-line: HELP IS ON THE WAY

UNDERWRITER TICKETS: from $225 and up, with increasing levels of benefits including listing in the programs, preferred seating, gala pre-show black-tie reception and post-performance dessert reception with the cast and other perks. A portion of the Underwriter level tickets help underwrite the cost of the event. An extensive silent auction precedes the show starting at 5:00 pm.

THE RICHMOND / ERMET AIDS FOUNDATION (REAF) is a non-profit 501(c)(3) Arts/AIDS organization dedicated to raising funds for AIDS service organizations in the Bay Area through the production of quality entertainment programs. REAF was founded by two mothers, Barbara Richmond and Peggy Ermet, who lost their only sons to AIDS as a way to honor their sons’ memories and help alleviate the suffering of all the other sons and daughters living with HIV and AIDS. REAF began as a wholly volunteer-run agency, partnering with a single agency to produce a fundraising event called “Help is on the Way: San Francisco Cares.” Today, REAF is still relies on a mostly volunteer Board and staff. HELP IS ON THE WAY has become the Bay Area’s largest annual AIDS benefit concert and one of the Bay Area’s primary sources of funding for many local AIDS service agencies. REAF has also expanded their partnership services to include ten agencies this year and focuses not only on raising funds but also on creating public awareness that the AIDS epidemic is not yet over and that many agencies are struggling to survive. REAF strives to create community alliances to support these agencies on multiple levels. Overall, beneficiary agencies that have partnered with REAF have reported increased overall giving levels, both financial and in-kind, through increased exposure to media, corporations and individual donors. Volunteerism to their agencies is also increased. REAF strives to build teamwork and cooperation among benefiting agencies through these annual partnerships.

For Tickets call – 415-273-1620
To order tickets on-line: HELP IS ON THE WAY

See Seán’s recent articles:
THE BIG VOICE: God or Merman?
HOTEL CASABLANCA – World Premiere in San Francisco
NEIL SEDAKA and PATTI LuPONE – This Week In San Francisco
JOHNNY MATHIS – Gets Misty with San Francisco Symphony
INSIGNIFICANT OTHERS – A Conversation with Composer Jay Kuo
NORMA SHEARER Flick Opens the San Francisco Silent Film Festival
JERSEY BOYS – Earth Angels invade Curran Theatre! Cast #2: Their Eyes Adore You!
IPHIGÉNIE EN TAURIDE – Everything old is new again at SF Opera
LA VIE EN ROSE (La Môme) – Biography of Edith Piaf – A Sensation at the 50th San Francisco International Film Festival
JERSEY BOYS – Earth Angels invade Curran Theatre! Cast #2: Their Eyes Adore You!
RIGOLETTO – SF OPERA Broadcasts on Classical 102.1 KDFC
TAKE ME OUT – At The New Conservatory Theater
SPIDER-MAN 3, An All-American Cinematic Marvel

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San Francisco Sentinel’s Fine Arts Critic Seán Martinfield is a native San Franciscan. He is a Theatre Arts Graduate from San Francisco State University, a professional singer, and well-known private vocal coach to Bay Area actors and singers of all ages and persuasions. His clients have appeared in Broadway National Tours including Wicked, Aïda, Miss Saigon, Rent, Bye Bye Birdie, in theatres and cabarets throughout the Bay Area, and are regularly featured in major City events including Diva Fest, Gay Pride, and Halloween In The Castro. As an Internet consultant in vocal development and audition preparation he has published thousands of responses to those seeking his advice concerning singing techniques, professional and academic auditions, and careers in the Performing Arts. Ask him a question on AllExperts.com . If you would like to build up your vocal performance chops and participate in the Bay Area’s rich theatrical scene, e-mail him at: seanmartinfield@att.net.

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NEWSOM STREETS HAVE THE FEEL OF PRECURSOR 1920s GERMANY

BELIEVE IT OR WHAT
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BY PAT MURPHY
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

Mayor Newsom has not shown leadership on public safety of San Franciscans.

Instead, this San Francisco mayor strives for community consensus on how best to end street violence.

And sulks before neighborhood meetings when confronted with his effort leaving San Francisco streets vile, most recently before a Polk Street gathering of residents and merchants.

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Photos by Bill Wilson

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Consensus building began more than two years ago as a broad range of San Francisco elected leadership got behind movement toward community policing.

It speedily succeeded with a multiplicity of programs to assist those arrested — and even those at risk for arrest — with immediate community help to claim the propserity, security, and dignity every San Franciscan needs.

It also promised innovative police intervention to stop criminal behavior, with instant access to means for the desperate to find crime needless.

The best and brightest San Franciscans poured their lifesblood into delivering a two-pronged model that works.

Still, today’s reality is the streets are as murderous and vile as they were two years ago. This mayor’s streets have the feel of precursor 1920s Germany.

Newsom wisely insists, “I want to make sure we do this right,” to stop criminal behavior — which must be stopped first — without return to rousts and cracked skulls.

To match San Francisco enlightened view of police work, consensus effort locked in individualized policing techniques crafted for each each neighborhood and localized culture.

The Sentinel suggests this well intentioned autonomy resulted in many police districts not incorporating acceptable and proven policing which is working in the Tenderloin usherered by Police Captain Gary Jimenez.

Newsom needs to get it in his head that he is the only official with the authority and stature to actually make things happen — to actually lead.

But Newsom reacts as if returning safety to San Francisco streets is all about him, all about his performance.

Stopping the behavior which turned San Francisco streets vile is bigger than any mayor, bigger than any political career.

End your self-centered sulk, Mr. Mayor, and lead.

See Related: CRIME

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SENTINEL FOUNDER PAT MURPHY
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Telephone: 415-846-2475
Email: SanFranciscoSentinel@yahoo.com

THE SAN FRANCISCO JUNE 15 CONDEMNATION OF ISRAEL – THE WORLDWIDE IGNORANCE – THE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS – THE SENTINEL OPINION

MORE AND MORE BAY AREA JEWS MOVING TO ISRAEL

SAN FRANCISCO SENTINEL TOPS IN ESTIMATED DOLLAR VALUATION AMONG LOCAL NEWS BLOGS – STRATEGICFIRST INDEPENDENT ANALYSIS

STRAIGHT PEOPLE NEED FALL SILENT WHEN WE SPEAK – SENTINEL OPINION

SAN FRANCISCO VETERANS MEMORIAL PROJECT KICKS-OFF – PROMISE UNFULFILLED FOR 75 YEARS – VIDEO

JEW HATER FARRAKAHN AMONG WHITE HOUSE RESIDENCE PAMPERED – SAN FRANCISCO SENTINEL OPINION

NETANYAHU DOES THE RIGHT THING – SAN FRANCISCO SENTINEL OPINION

DO NOT FLY SWISS AIR – SAN FRANCISCO SENTINEL OPINION

THE AMERICAN PEOPLE AND NEWS MEDIA ARE AFRAID TO CONFRONT ISLAM – SAN FRANCISCO SENTINEL OPINION

HOW CHRISTIAN WERE THE FOUNDERS?

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July 30 Videos of The Day – MAYOR CONVENES PARK BUMS – POVERTY IN THE MIDST OF PLENTY – HAPPY DAYS – July 30 Photo of the Day – NEWSOM MULTI-TASKING – Babies born today will adapt to necessity – Live radar and weather forecast

July 30 Videos of The Day
MAYOR CONVENES PARK BUMS

POVERTY IN THE MIDST OF PLENTY

SEE RELATED NEWSOM STREETS HAVE THE FEEL OF PRECURSOR 1920s GERMANY

HAPPY DAYS

Photo of The Day
MULTI-TASKING
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CLICK IMAGE TO BE HAPPY

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JULY 30 BIRTHDAY LORE
You have definite likes and dislikes. You make few friends, but those few are real and loyal to you. You are ambitious, energetic, and persevering, and adopt yourself readily to every necessity. You are demonstrative in your great love of your family. Your interests center on your home and dear ones.

ADVICE FOR JULY 30
Keep a cooler in the car for grocery trips. Use it for frozen items, meats, and dairy products.

JULY 30 WORD OF THE DAY
SOS. Defintion: The letters signified by the signal ( . . . — . . . ) prescribed by the International Radiotelegraphic Convention of 1908 for use by ships in distress. SOS was chosen as the universal distress signal because this combination of three dots followed by three dashes followed by three dots (…—…), was easy to send and easily recognized, especially since they were usually sent as a nine-character signal, which stood out against the background of three-character Morse Code letters. The letters themselves are meaningless. SOS does not stand for Save Our Souls, Save Our Ship, Stop Other Signals, or Sure Of Sinking.

JULY 30 IN HISTORY
Caspar Wistar began operation of the first successful glass factory in America, in Allowaystown, New Jersey, 1739. During Tropical Storm Brenda, 4.5 inches of rain fell in 11 hours on New York City, 1960.

REALTIME SAN FRANCISCO WEATHER
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Monday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a high near 68. Southwest wind between 8 and 10 mph.

Monday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 56. Southwest wind between 8 and 10 mph.

Tuesday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a high near 69. Southwest wind between 8 and 10 mph.

Tuesday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 57. Southwest wind between 8 and 10 mph.

Wednesday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 69.

Wednesday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 57.

Thursday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 69.

Thursday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 57.

Friday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a high near 69.

Friday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 57.

Saturday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a high near 70.

Saturday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 57.

Sunday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a high near 68.

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LET OUR EATERIES LIVE

BELIEVE IT OR WHAT
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BY PAT MURPHY
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

San Francisco small restaurant owners are scorned on all fronts for their federal lawsuit insisting they have the right to determine employee benefits, not the City now implementing universal health care with forced payment by restaurant owners necessary…

Our young San Francisco mayor — The Gav brooks 40 October 10 — publicly scalds restaurant owners every chance he gets for launching the lawsuit… Newsom notes threateningly he is not happy about the lawsuit

Mandated restaurant owner payment is essential to establishing universal health care… Says The Gav…

Really, Gav honey, you should be more worried about them not being happy with you… Your performance is arrogant…

Newsom, partnered with Supervisor Tom Ammiano, imposed the employer mandate provision with very little imput from restaurant owners… It was only when owners noted they had the power to resist that they were seriously ushered to a seat…

With Ammiano, quick to go brittle, snorting he had heard owner hardship complaints for ever so long…

Further, that Ammiano did not believe hardship complaints and anyway their money is needed to benefit all San Franciscans, suck it up…

Suck this up: People don’t go into business to create jobs… Or deliver benefits…

People go into business to make money, say it out loud…

To use that money to cement their unqiue dream into expanding reality… Secondarily growing that reality with new jobs, more jobs, and newly employed San Franciscans receiving new benefits…

It is odious that in a town which works so hard to maintain neighborhood character, in a town where neighborhood character is greatly defined by world famed unique eateries, the venal attempting to tap altruist sentiment would treat our unique eateries with such pompous dismissal…

Owner after owner testified that the imposed mandate would close their doors and foreclose opening of new small restaurants…

That trend is already underway… Preponderence of new restaurant openings in San Francisco are low-cost formula food fops…

Be glad we have that judicial third branch of government, and go out and encourage owners who work 14 to 16 hours every day to keep their dream alive and your neighborhood unique…

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PAT MURPHY
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
In his youth, Pat Murphy worked as a General Assignment reporter for the Richmond Independent, the Berkeley Daily Gazette, and the San Francisco Chronicle. He served as Managing Editor of the St. Albans (Vermont) Daily Messenger at age 21. Murphy also launched ValPak couponing in San Francisco, as the company’s first San Francisco franchise owner. He walked the bricks, developing ad strategy for a broad range of restaurants and merchants. Pat knows what works and what doesn’t work. His writing skill has been employed by marketing agencies, including Don Solem & Associates. He has covered San Francisco governance for the past ten years. Pat scribes an offbeat view of the human family through Believe It or What.

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