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TEETH WHITENING: What once cost $1000 now is found on shelves of drug stores and beauty salons

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Go Smile ampoules are an easy way to get whitening on the run, without any trays or gels. (Fashion Wire Daily/Jeannette Park)

By Jeannette Park

If you think celebrities are born with a perfect set of teeth to go with their perfect beauty and body, guess again. Porcelain caps and surgery are taking the place of a good brushing twice a day, and bleaching has become a daily routine. More than 10 million Americans can be counted in the group seeking pearly perfection.

But what once cost nearly $1000 per visit is now found in drugstores and on beauty supply store shelves. Teeth whitening solutions used to be simple brush-on gels that were applied like white out for the teeth, but now involve malleable trays, gel syringes and rinses. The time it takes to get your teeth corn yellow to pearl white depends on a number of factors: the product, the condition of your teeth and time.

This self-professed teeth whitener has tried them all – from paint-on gels that cost a mere $4.99 to laser whitening treatments at a “whitening salon” for nearly $2500, it’s been done. The results? Spending less than five bucks for treatment guarantees absolutely no difference and one misfire of the laser can cause lip burns. To help you shuffle through the numerous versions of a “hope in a box,” here are three kits that will give more wattage to your smile.

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Go Smile Advanced Formula B1 Tooth Whitening On the Go
$89 for a 10-day supply, available at gosmile.com

Created by New York dentist Jonathan Levine, the Go Smile ampoules are the niftiest and most convenient whitening product currently available. Housed in tiny cardboard and plastic tubes, you simply uncap one ampoule and squeeze its middle, releasing a clear liquid that contains the bleaching properties. One swipe across your teeth from the sponge-like applicator, and you can just toss and go. And because of its minty flavor, it can also double as a breath freshener after a meal and won’t leave any sort of residue in your mouth. Although the price can be a bit steep, you’re paying for the convenience of the tubes and the company guarantees a whiter smile in just a week.

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Supersmile Professional Whitening System
$70 for a three-month supply, available at supersmile.com

A product derived from another celebrity dentist, Irwin Smigel, Supersmile’s system is as simple as brushing your teeth. Two tubes come in the kit; one is the whitening toothpaste, and the other (the accelerator) is the whitening component that actually bleaches the teeth. Just an equal sized dab of each on a dry toothbrush and brush as you normally would. The combination creates a one-two punch: The toothpaste contains an ingredient designed to dissolve the clear, sticky film on teeth to which plaque and stains adhere, and the accelerator gently bleaches and cleans the teeth. Even though the toothpaste contains baking soda, a natural teeth whitener, Supersmile’s product is absent of the chalky taste found in similar pastes. With no trays or solutions to deal with, you won’t have to alter your daily tooth brushing routine, and it works to brighten porcelain veneers and crowns to their original shade. For a super duty clean, use it on an electric toothbrush like Oral-B Triumph Professional Care that cleans teeth, gums and even flosses too!

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Crest Whitestrips Daily Multicare
$39.99 for a six-week supply, available at drugstore.com

One of the first entrants in the teeth whitening market, Crest Whitestrips is recognized by its clear-sticker feature that adheres directly onto teeth. Designed to remove surface stains and prevent future buildup, these Whitestrips used to be the handiest method of whitening teeth because you could just stick the strips onto the upper and lower teeth for 30 minutes twice day. Although more convenient methods are now available, Crest Whitestrips are the go-to box for the mass market looking to achieve a celebrity-like smile. Its newest version is designed to use for just five minutes a day, thanks to a precise allocation of peroxide that is safe for daily use. But you pay for what you get: the Crest Whitestrips do not whiten crowns or caps, and because of the direct contact of peroxide to the gums and lips, it can cause slight discomfort and sensitivity to those areas. Still, it’s a great and economical way to get white teeth that last.

Fashion Wire Daily

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WOMENS FASHION: Eco-Friendly Fabrics no longer an aesthetic sacrifice

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A dress designed by Elisa Jimenez using Ingeo fabric worn by Tizana Tronci at the Ingeo NatureWorks Earth Month preview of sustainable fashion designs at the Launch Pad Showroom in New York on Tuesday, April 24, 2007. (Fashion Wire Daily/Renata Espinosa)

By Renata Espinosa

It used to be that eco-conscious clothing meant hemp t-shirts and organic cotton yoga pants – fashion hadn’t yet entered the equation.

Now, not only are there smaller niche designers to choose from like Linda Loudermilk and Elisa Jimenez, who have long used eco-friendly fabrics and production methods, but major fashion labels like Stella McCartney, Versace and Diesel are also producing clothes with Mother Earth in mind, using fabrics made from sustainable plants like bamboo and corn.

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Yellow and pink skirt designed by Linda Loudermilk and dresses designed by Rianne de Wit, all using Ingeo fabric, on display at the Ingeo NatureWorks Earth Month preview of sustainable fashion designs at the Launch Pad Showroom in New York on Tuesday, April 24, 2007. (Fashion Wire Daily/Renata Espinosa)

“It doesn’t have to be an aesthetic sacrifice just because it’s eco-friendly,” said Jimenez at an Ingeo NatureWorks “Earth Month” event in New York on April 24. Ingeo is a synthetic fabric whose selling point is that it is made from a 100 percent renewable resource, corn, which Jimenez has been using in her collections for the past three years.

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Clothing designed by Moral Fervor using Ingeo fabric on display at the Ingeo NatureWorks Earth Month preview of sustainable fashion designs at the Launch Pad Showroom in New York on Tuesday, April 24, 2007. (Fashion Wire Daily/Renata Espinosa)

“It’s not a trend, it’s absolutely necessary,” said Melissa Sack, who designs a line of sweatshop-free clothing called Moral Fervor with Emily Santamore. “People now shop at Whole Foods, they buy organic skincare and cleaning products, but fashion is the last frontier. It’s been the slowest to integrate.”

Moral Fervor’s mission is to be socially conscious on all levels, said Sack, from the biodegradable products they use in their offices to the mills in Portugal they’ve selected to produce their clothing, which have their own in-house water purification systems. In many mills, said Sack, the water used in the dyeing process turns black and it’s released back into the water supply.

“It’s a holistic way of operating business,” said Sack.

For their current Spring 2007 line, Moral Fervor used Ingeo fabrics.

It’s a cross between a natural and a synthetic fiber, says Ingeo spokesperson Tiziana Tronci. “It breathes, it’s hypoallergenic and has the performance of a synthetic fiber, but it comes from nature.”

Thus, it’s an alternative for clothing manufacturers instead of using petroleum-based synthetic fabrics such as nylon and polyester, which do not originate from a sustainable resource and aren’t biodegradable. While it’s derived from natural sources, the fact that it is a synthetic makes it versatile, said Tronci.

As far as textiles go, it’s been used as denim, wovens, jersey and also more unusual fabrications, such as those found in Elisa Jimenez’s designs, where the fabric takes on delicate, paper doily-like qualities, yet has the strength of a traditional woven.

Ingeo is not without its critics, however, namely with those opposed to genetically engineered crops. It was reported by the Associated Press last year that Patagonia, an outdoor clothing company known for its environmental awareness, decided against using the fabric because Ingeo relies, at least partially, on genetically modified corn (known as GMO corn).

But for designers like Jimenez, the pros of using a fiber like Ingeo – its biodegradability, its sustainability – are in keeping with their business philosophy.

“I want to live more conscientiously,” said Jimenez. The disposable nature of fashion is an idea Jimenez, also an artist, has incorporated into her designs, so using something like Ingeo as her medium is filled with conceptual significance.

“Where does the stuff go after we’ve worn it?” Jimenez asked, arguing that if something isn’t designed to be kept for a long time, like fashion, then it’s better to use materials that are designed to breakdown over time.

“Eco-conscious is the new luxury,” she continued. “It costs more to produce, but it has more finesse.”

Fashion Wire Daily

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STREET VIOLENCE: Madness crosing the desk Friday of San Francisco Tenderloin Police Captain Gary Jimenez

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Tenderloin Captain Gary Jimenez

Let me share with you some of the madness that crossed my desk this Friday via my frustrated officers.

– A couple were lounging on the 100 block of Taylor Street when a citizen upset over their mess struck one of the loungers with a 40 oz. beer bottle. One went to the hospital; one went into the revolving door of the criminal justice system and one remained lounging waiting for something to presumably happen.

– A poor man who just received housing went out in the street bought ten dollars of crack cocaine and just started to light up on a street corner to celebrate his good fortune when along comes a Police Sergeant and arrested him for possession of the cocaine and crack pipe and being under the influence of drugs. The Sheriff’s Department refused to accept the prisoner on the basis he was mentally ill (I could comment on this but any comment the reader devises would probably fit as well).

– A man was detained with a carload of stolen property he had just purchased at North Seventh Street and Market with the intent of transporting the goods south of the border to sell for a healthy profit. He was released for further investigation; because of the late hour the property plainly marked with the store price labels could not be verified as stolen.

– Another couple camping on the 100 block of Taylor Street under a makeshift blanket shelter refused to dislodge and required the beat officers to charge them with a variety of quality of life violations and seize their campsite as evidence. The crazy thing was the officer recently arranged housing for the female camper but she wanted to smoke methamphetamine with her lover on the street. They were given tickets and told to live happily ever after.

Not all is this bleak, on Tuesday May 8th at noon a group of residents plan to address the Tenderloin situation by peacefully marching from 201 Turk Street to City Hall where they hope to be heard by the Board of Supervisors.

I admire their tenacity, I share their hope and I dream their dream of a safe and decent neighborhood.

TENDERLOIN DISTRICT 6 SUPERVISOR CHRIS DALY

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SPECIAL REPORT: San Francisco International Film Festival – Galas, shmalas, bring on the movies

MOVING PICTURES
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By PJ Johnston
Sentinel Film Critic
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

Roll Through 50 Years of The San Francisco International Film Festival

I don’t know if it had to do with having attended too many black-tie benefit dinners at this point in my life – or with the fact that the Warriors were playing a Game 6 playoff showdown for the first time since the 1970s and I was itchy to get in front of a television set to see it – but I just wasn’t feeling this year’s Awards Gala at the San Francisco International Film Festival.

It certainly wasn’t because of the honorees: this year’s SFIFF awards went to Spike Lee, Robin Williams, Peter Morgan and George Lucas, a heavy-creamed crop if there ever was one. And the spread at the St. Francis was lovely, particularly the cocktail lounge area imbued with Hollywood glamour and noir-era glitz by Stanlee Gatti. And of course the silver anniversary gave the entire proceeding an air of importance that doesn’t always fill the atmosphere of top-ticket film festival events, even here in San Francisco.

But there was no bad-boy at the mic, a la the Mayor Willie Brown years; most of the speeches were canned and past their expiration date; the room seemed too big and loud; and half the crowd was nursing a hangover from the Modern Ball, held the night before at SFMOMA, also masterminded by the peerless Mr. Gatti.

And the loud crowd squandered a beautiful performance by the silky perfect jazz vocalist Paula West, who found herself in the unfortunate position of competing with the delivery of the first course and a chorus of 1,000 rather rude diners. A talent like West’s merits more devotion than that.

But the pols – John Burton, AG Jerry Brown, DA Kamala Harris and Mayor Gavin Newsom among them – rubbed elbows with the well-heeled supporters of the San Francisco Film Society, and the two-week international film festival paused to take stock of the achievements of four of the greatest talents in cinema, American or otherwise.

Actually, it didn’t really pause. Back at the Kabuki, the festival kept on rolling with a diversity of films that continues to challenge and surprise the adventurous filmgoer.

I guess maybe that’s why I wasn’t warming up to the gala this year; I would’ve preferred to spend my time delving further and further into the offerings of the festival. You can’t see ’em all, but seeing as many as possible is half the fun.

SFIFF WEEK 2: PJ’s Picks

Audience of One
dir. Michael Jacobs, U.S./Italy, 88 mins.
Monday, 12:45 p.m. (Kabuki)

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One of those offbeat offerings you might’ve seen at the festival, and only at the festival, was competing with the gala Thursday night. If you weren’t at the St. Francis gussied up for the Awards Gala (or sitting in a sports bar watching the Warriors’ Baron Davis make mince-meat of NBA MVP Dirk Nowitski), you could’ve been at the Kabuki Thursday night for the first of two screenings of “Audience of One,” a strange documentary about the strange journey of a religious zealot from San Francisco.

Filmmaker Michael Jacobs follows a 40ish Pentecostal pastor who, believing himself the recipient of a “prophetic whisper” from God, embarks on a massive project to produce a blockbuster religious epic. Paster Richard Gazowsky uses his congregation’s donations to fund his $50 million movie, transforms his San Francisco church into a functional movie studio and even takes his cast and crew of followers to Italy for on-location shooting.

It’s a sharp look into the twisted logic and devotion of a man to his project, and a flock to its shepherd. Jacobs keeps the film tight and well-paced – one doubts the same could be said of Gazowsky’s epic – and offers an interesting play on the devotional, even obsessive, persistence required of any filmmaker to get his or her movie made.

Vitus
dir. Fredi M. Murer, Switzerland, 120 mins.
Sunday, noon (Clay)

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One film that could fall through tracks, but hopefully won’t, is “Vitus,” the story of a boy genius struggling to live among us mere mortals. It’s an uplifting story benefiting from strong performances – notably, Teo Gheorghiu’s Vitus, Julika Jenkins as his pressurized mother and, especiallys, the great Bruno Ganz as the boy’s loving and eccentric grandfather.

Vitus is not only a prodigy in logic and mathematics, he’s a piano virtuoso – and his relationship to the music draws out the tension between flourishing as a lonely wunderkind and striving for childhood normalcy and affection. It helps that Gheorghiu is an actual piano virtuoso; his scenes at the piano are authentic and exhilarating. He’s also a good actor; whether he can dominate the stock market as he does in the movie is another question, but we’ll let it go.

Though it strains credibility at times, “Vitus” is an enthralling film that never veers into easy sentimentality – as it undoubtedly would if given the Hollywood treatment – but nevertheless charms. It probably deserved more than its single Sunday noontime showing, so go check it out.

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PJ Johnston is president of the San Francisco Arts Commission and a former executive director of the San Francisco Film Commission. He served as Mayor Willie Brown’s press secretary and now runs his own communications consulting firm in San Francisco. A former journalist, he has written about movies for several publications, including the San Jose Mercury News and – long ago, in a galaxy far, far away – for the San Francisco Bay Guardian. Email PJ at pj@pjcommunications.com.

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POSTAGE HIKE: First Class stamp goes to 41-cents May 14

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The price of a First Class stamp is going up, from 39 cents to 41 cents, the United States Postal Service is reporting.

According to USPS spokesman Augustine Ruiz, post offices are now selling the new 41-cent stamps as well as one- and two-cent stamps for customers who still have a supply of 39-cent stamps.

The price of a Breast Cancer Research fundraising stamp is also increasing. Instead of costing 45 cents, the price will be 55 cents.

The new postage rate goes into effect May 14.

Customers can get the new stamps from a number of places, including post offices nationwide, Automated Postal Centers, ATM’s, online at or by calling 1-800-STAMP-24.

In addition to introducing new postage rates on May 14, USPS is also changing the way international mail is sent.

“USPS has simplified its eight main international products into four: Global Express Guaranteed, Express Mail International, Priority Mail International and First-Class Mail International,” Ruiz said in a written statement.

New Priority Mail and Express Mail packaging will allow mail customers to use the same packaging for shipping within the U.S. and to other countries.

Bay City News

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POLICE: San Francisco Police send largest contingent ever for 300 mile Police Unity Tour to honor fallen officers

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By Tamara Barak

Seven San Francisco police officers are gearing up to bicycle 300 miles in the annual Police Unity Tour, which honors those who died in the line of duty.

The tour kicks off Wednesday in Morris Township, N.J. and ends three days later at the National Law Enforcement Memorial in Washington, D.C.

San Francisco police began participating in the annual ride and fundraising effort in 2004, after beloved Bayview station officer Isaac Espinoza was fatally shot in the line of duty.

It has grown each year since, said Officer Mike Amoroso.

“This year’s group is the largest that has been in the Police Unity Tour to date,” he said.

The tour, in which officers “ride for those who died,” is a way of showing solidarity with families who have lost loved ones in the line of duty.

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When cyclists arrive at the law enforcement memorial, they are greeted by families of fallen police officers bearing pictures of those they have lost.

“The emotional level is incredible. You well up and you cry. You can’t help it,” Amaroso said. “You realize that their husband, wife, son, brother – they died doing the job we do. We ride to make sure we won’t forget them.”

The ride also provides police officers to connect with colleagues across the country.

Each officer raises $1,700 to attend the event. The money raised is donated to the National Law Enforcement Memorial. Last year, the ride raised more than $1 million, Amaroso said.

Other San Francisco officers attending the event include Sgt. Ronald Banta, who heads the department’s tactical K9 unit, and Officer Rolli Canales, a senior dog handler. The pair is riding in honor of Darryl Tsujimoto, who led the unit before dying of a heart attack during a training
exercise on Treasure Island last year.

Sgt. Patrick Tobin and Officer Jason Gardner of the Tenderloin station; Sgt. Johnny Burke and Officer Officer Steve Benzinger; and Amaroso, from the Northern station, will ride as well.

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See Related Fundraiser for family of stricken San Francisco Police Officer Jack Santos

Bay City News

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SAN FRANCISCO CINCO DE MAYO – History of Battle for Pueblo – Festival Agenda

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By Pat Murphy
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

San Francisco Cinco de Mayo festivities begin Saturday morning, an important date in Mexico history memoralizing the Battle for Pueblo.

The 11:00 a.m. celebration kick-off of Cinco de Mayo events is slated for Dolores Park located at 18th and Dolores Streets.

Although some mistake Cinco de Mayo for Mexico Indepedence day — which is honored September 16 — Cinco de Mayo actually celebrates Mexico victory over French armies.

The Battle of Puebla, Mexico on May 5, 1862 was one of the few victories of the Mexican people over the occupying French Army. The battle has become legendary and has been susceptible to many variations in the telling.

The French Army at the time was led by General Charles Ferdinand Latrille de Lorencez. He had great contempt for the Mexican people, so much so that he believed he could control the whole country like puppets with his army of 6,000 men. What led up to the battle was a misunderstanding, fired by infuriation, of the French forces’ agreement to withdraw to the coast before resuming hostilities. The French left some of their sicker men in the highlands. When the Mexican people saw these men walking around with rifles, they took it that hostilities had recommenced. There were not supposed to be any able-bodied men left behind. Add to that the fact that negotiations for the withdrawal were breaking down.

A vehement complaint was lodged with General Lorencez who took the effrontery as a plan to murder his ailing forces. Lorencez decided to hold up his withdrawal to the coast by instead occupying Orizaba, which prevented the Mexicans from defending the passes between Orizaba and the landing port of Veracruz. The 33 year old Mexican Commander General, Ignacio Zaragoza Seguin, fell back to Alcuzingo Pass, where he and his army were badly beaten in a skirmish with Lorencez’s aggressive forces on April 28. Zaragoza retreated to Puebla, which was heavily fortified. Puebla had been held by the Mexican government since the Wars of Reform in 1860. To its north lie the forts Loreto and Guadalupe on opposite hilltops. Zaragoza had a trench joining the forts via the saddle.

Lorencez heard that the people of Puebla were friendly to the French, and that the Mexican Republican garrison which kept the people in line would be overrun by the population once he made a show of force. This would prove to be a serious miscalculation on Lorencez’s part. On May 5th, against all advice, Lorencez decided to attack Puebla from the north. Unfortunately, he started his attack a little too late in the day, using his artillery just before noon and by noon advancing his infantry, which by the third attack needed the full engagement of all its reserves.The French artillery had run out of ammunition, so the third attack went unsupported. The Mexican forces and the Republican Garrison both put up a stout defense and even took to the field to defend the positions between the hilltop forts.

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Depictions of the battle showing Mexican cavalry overwhelming the French troops below the fort at Loreto. Note there are no machete wielding civilians, as some accounts have it

As the French retreated from their final assault, Zaragoza had his cavalry attack them on the right and left while the troops concealed along the road pivoted out to flank them badly. By 3 p.m. the daily rains had started, making a slippery mess of the battlefield. Lorencez withdrew to distant positions, counting 462 of his men killed against only 83 of the Mexicans. He waited a couple of days for Zaragoza to attack again, but Zaragoza held his ground. Lorencez then completely withdrew to Orizaba. The political repercussions were overwhelming, as the outnumbered Mexicans used what courage and determination they could to repel the ominous French Army. When news of the defeat reached France, Napoleon III sent 29,000 additional troops to Mexico. Suffice it to say they eventually overran Puebla, but the legendary battle had created a Mexican moral victory which is celebrated today as Cinco de Mayo.

Excerpts from Wikipedia

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REBUILDING BAYVIEW: Hunters Point Citizens Advisory Committee and Children’s Fund Citizens Advisory Committee appointments announced

San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom today announced appointments to the Hunters Point Citizens Advisory Committee and the Children’s Fund Citizens Advisory Committee.

Six people were appointed to the Hunters Point committee: Ron Mitchell, Pastor Joe Bell, Dedria Smith, Dr. Veronica Hunnicutt, Christine Johnson and Andre Wright.

Mitchell, a 50-year resident of the Bayview, worked on the city’s light rail and other transportation projects. He is a supporter of the Hunters Point Shipyard redevelopment.

Bell has also lived in the neighborhood for more than 50 years and has testified in support of the redevelopment plan before the city’s policymakers and community groups.

Smith is a resident of the Alice Griffith Housing Project, where she serves on the resident council. She has worked closely with the Mayor’s Office of Community Development and the Communities of Opportunities program to link Alice Griffith residents with city services. Smith is also the executive director of the Alice Griffith Parents Association and does voting
outreach work in her community.

Hunnicutt, the dean of Southeast College, will fill the “expert seat” on the council. She has worked with Newsom to establish programs for workforce development and participated on advisory panels on biotech, employment and technology forums.

Johnson is a consultant to financial firm JP Morgan, where she helped build debt management software to help governments and municipal agencies manage their debts. She also has a background in engineering.

Wright operates Precision Transport Company with his father and brother. The minority-owned company has been at the Shipyard since 1980 and is a longtime employer of Bayview residents.

In addition, Newsom appointed Abby Snay to the Children’s Fund Citizens Advisory Committee. Snay has been the executive director of Jewish Vocational Services since 1984, and has been instrumental in its growth.

Bay City News

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MAZE COLLAPSE: Extra BART service through weekend – AC Transit expands West Oakland service to San Francisco

Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) announced today it plans to continue extra service this weekend and on Monday after seeing a huge spike in ridership this week during MacArthur Maze demolition and reconstruction.

And the Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) is expanding service from
West Oakland to San Francisco.

BART spokesman Jim Allison said that this weekend there would be an increase in train trips and more cars added to existing trains.

The decision to keep extended service running through the weekend comes after a week when BART saw two of its three busiest days in ridership to date.

According to Allison, a record setting Tuesday saw 374,200 people ride BART, followed by BART’s third highest ridership total on Thursday, when the system saw 375,200 riders.

Allison said planned extra service is one reason why BART has been able to maintain or exceed its 94 percent on-time performance while carrying record numbers of riders.

BART plans this weekend to add cars to the Dublin/Pleasanton-SFO/Millbrae line and the Richmond-Fremont line, Allison reported.

On Monday morning BART will run 11 more trains than usual, each being extended by at least one car. The additional trains will be made up of six Concord to San Francisco lines and five San Francisco to Concord lines.

On Monday afternoon seven additional one-way trips will be made, with one additional train running on both the Richmond-Daly City line and the Daly City-Richmond line, three additional trains on the Daly City-Concord line and two additional trains on the Concord-Daly City line.

BART officials say they are ready to take on even more passengers if an increase in demand becomes necessary.

As crews scramble to fix the destroyed freeway connector at the Maze, AC Transit is beefing up its service to San Francisco with eight morning trips every weekday and 48 return trips throughout the day.

Line W service begins at the California Department of Transportation park and ride lot at Seventh and Linden streets in Oakland, where 180 parking spaces are available. The service will run every 30 minutes between 6:15 a.m. and 8:35 a.m. to the San Francisco Transbay Terminal at First and Mission streets.

Return service is scheduled to be available on AC Transit Line W or Line O at 10-minute intervals between 4 p.m. and 7 p.m.

The AC Transit move is the latest effort by regional public transportation agencies to alleviate the commute problems caused by Sunday’s explosion on the connector ramp from westbound Interstate Highway 80 to southbound Interstate Highway 880.

Bay Area Rapid Transit spokesman Jim Allison announced Thursday that free additional parking for the Rockridge station would be available beginning today.

Around 90 additional parking spaces will be available to riders at the former Albertson’s lot at 5727 College Ave. in Oakland — about one block north of the Rockridge station — until June 10, Allison reported.

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HEALTH: Smoke-free policy adopted by 45 San Francisco Bay Area farmers markets

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The anti-smoking advocate group Breathe California reported today that the Pacific Coast Farmers Market Association is planning to announce a new smoke-free policy for all of its 45 Bay Area markets.

Breathe California spokesman Dave Lowe said that the official announcement of the Association’s new policy would take place Sunday at the Belmont Farmers Market.

The decision to declare the new policy came after board members from the Farmers Market Association decided a ban on smoking would be a good way to promote healthy lifestyles along with healthy food, Low said.

Belmont Mayor Coralin Feierbach is expected to be on hand for the announcement, as well as Farmers Market Association representative Chris Hanks and advocates from Breathe California and the group Smoke-Free San Mateo County Advocates.

Low said the idea to approach the Farmers Market Association came from a group of local Peninsula college students who were vocal about influencing Bay Area businesses and groups to develop anti-smoking policies.

The students, who are predominately from Skyline College and the College of San Mateo, felt the Farmers Market Association would be receptive to a non-smoking policy because it seemed a large number of shoppers at the market would support the idea.

The Pacific Coast Farmers Market Association — the largest operator of farmers markets in California — worked together with Breathe California and Smoke-Free San Mateo County Advocates to put the new policy in place, according to Low.

The Belmont Farmers Market will take place on the corner of El Camino Real and Oneill Avenue at 10 a.m. Sunday.

Bay City News

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DOMESTIC VIOLENCE: Symbol of San Francisco failure to protect domestic violence victims gag order ruling delayed to May 17

By Tamara Barak and Brent Begin

A man at the center of a murder case that became a symbol among advocates for the justice system’s failure to protect domestic violence victims appeared briefly in a San Francisco courtroom this morning.

Handcuffed and dressed in the orange uniform worn by county jail inmates, Tari Ramirez, 33, appeared in front of Superior Court Judge Kathleen Kelly but did not speak.

Ramirez was represented today by public defender Matthew Rosen.

Both Rosen and Assistant District Attorney Liz Aguilar-Tarchi, who is prosecuting the case, are bound by a temporary gag order.

This morning Kelly delayed until May 17 a ruling to make the gag order permanent.

Ramirez was extradited from Mexico last month after being sought for more than six years in the Oct. 22, 2000 murder of his former girlfriend, Claire Joyce Tempongko, in her Richmond district home.

He pleaded not guilty on April 23.

The FBI arrested Ramirez on June 15, 2006 in Mexico. He was living with a relative near Cancun and working at a resort under an assumed name.

Ramirez fought the extradition, and federal officials had worked for 10 months to bring him to San Francisco.

Ramirez had a long history of domestic violence. Police arrested him three times in 1999 for assaulting Tempongko, and he spent four months in jail for one of the arrests. In the month leading up to her murder, police prepared two separate reports alleging Ramirez had battered Tempongko.

A year after her murder, the victim’s mother, Clara Tempongko, along with the victim’s two surviving children sued the city of San Francisco, alleging that the police failed to transmit their reports to the city’s adult probation department, district attorney and superior court as
required by various regulations and procedures.

In 2004, the city of San Francisco settled the lawsuit by awarding $500,000 to Claire Tempongko’s two children.

Bay City News

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HEALTH: Stanford University study finds outdoor smoke a significant risk to nonsmokers

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By Jason Bennert

A group of Stanford researchers have concluded that nonsmokers face significant secondhand smoke exposure when around smokers even outdoors.

“We were surprised to discover that being within a few feet of a smoker outdoors may expose you to air pollution levels that are comparable, on average, to indoor levels that we measured in previous studies of homes and taverns,” study and co-author and Stanford consulting professor of civil and environmental engineering Wayne Ott said.

“For example, if you’re at a sidewalk cafi, and you sit within 18 inches of a person who smokes two cigarettes over the course of an hour, your exposure to secondhand smoke could be the same as if you sat one hour inside a tavern with smokers,” Ott said.

“Based on our findings, a child in close proximity to adult smokers at a backyard party also could receive substantial exposure to secondhand smoke.”

The study also found that proximity makes all of the difference when it comes to secondhand smoke.

“Our data also show that if you move about six feet away from an outdoor smoker, your exposure levels are much lower,” study co-author and Stanford consulting professor of civil and environmental engineering Neil Klepeis said.

In the study, the researchers used portable electronic monitors to make precise measurements of toxic airborne particles emitted from cigarettes at 10 sites near the Stanford campus. The study appears in the May issue of the Journal of the Air and Waste Management Association.

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BUSINESS: Diverting 10% of San Francisco purchases from chain stores to small businesses could create 1,300 new jobs, study indicates

By Elizabeth Daley

A group of locally owned businesses commissioned a study that found that diverting 10 percent of consumer purchases from chain stores to small businesses in San Francisco could create 1,300 new jobs and yield nearly $200 million in incremental economic activity each year.

Pete Mulvihill, owner of Green Apple Books, a local bookstore in San Francisco’s Inner Richmond District, said he is not surprised small businesses economically benefit local communities.

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Pete Mulvihill

“We do all our signage printing at local shops and our insurance agent lives in the neighborhood,” said Mulvihill, listing just a few of the ways his store gives back to the community financially.

“The simplest example is employees on their lunch break at Borders eat at the mall at a chain, ours go down the block to Toy Boat, or somewhere on Clement Street.”

“Clement Street is a perfect example of the diversity of retail shopping that can exist without big box stores.”

Mulvihill is a member of the San Francisco Locally Owned Merchant’s Alliance that commissioned the study.

He said the group hired the independent economic research firm Civic Economics to test a hypothesis that they had – that shopping locally benefited the community.

Mulvihill said he was surprised to find what a big impact such a small shift in spending might make on the local economy. However, he acknowledged the need for larger businesses such as supermarkets to exist even in neighborhoods like the Inner Richmond.

Diane W. Barrett, a Florist and co-president of the Noe Valley Merchants Association in San Francisco said she enjoys having a few big businesses in her neighborhood.

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Diane W. Barrett

Barrett said bigger businesses in Noe Valley such as Wells Fargo or the Bank of America often donate money to community projects because they have more money to give.

“What I don’t get is big stores getting tax breaks in order to operate sometimes. Government encourages chains to move in because they think more jobs will be created, but jobs are lost at local businesses when big chains come in,” said Mulvihill who recommended a variety of books on the
subject.

“Our tagline is shop local first,” said Mulvihill who recently served as a referee for a sports game at an elementary school down the block.

“Someone came in and said they needed a ref,” said Mulvihill, “we are involved in that human way.”

Bay City News

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San Francisco Bay Bridge collapsed connector back in use as early as Wednesay – 511.org lists Park and Ride Logs

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Photo by John Han
Sentinel Photographer
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

Bay Area drivers can expect to be using the Interstate Highway 880 ramp that was damaged in Sunday’s tanker truck accident as early as next Wednesday, Caltrans spokesman Bob Haus said this morning.

In an effort to serve the increased number of public transit users after the collapse of part of the MacArthur Maze on Sunday morning, the regional Web site 511.org has expanded information about Bay Area Park and Ride lots.

The updated information page provides transportation options for those commuters affected by the closure of Interstate Highways 580 and 880, according to the Metropolitan Transportation Commission. Commuters can click on the scrolling “Breaking News” ticker on the Web site and find a list of Park and Ride lots that have been recently surveyed and found to have
available parking.

The site also shows users the location of each lot, which transit agency provides service to the lot, as well as additional details such as lighting or bike locker availability, the commission reported.

Park and Ride lots can also be used as meeting points for carpool and van pool, according to the commission.

The damaged section of 880 is expected to be open for traffic in five to eight days, Haus said. The highway sustained damage, but the section is still structurally sound, so Caltrans will not need to replace any steel on that part of the road.

“Right now we are concentrating on false work, which is temporary external supports that we will attach to the freeway,” Haus said.

Caltrans crews will attach long steel columns to the highway to brace the road deck,
so that crews can attach jacks and lift the freeway 9 inches. By lifting the section of road workers will be able to straighten the steel that was warped during the accident.

Crews will be repaving the road deck that was damaged by the fire at the same time as other crews are straightening the steel beams, according to Haus.

The Interstate Highway 580 ramp will be repaired in approximately 50 days, Haus said. Around nine contractors will submit bids for the repair job and the contract will be awarded the afternoon of May 7.

The contract will contain both incentives and disincentives, Haus said. The repairs should be done by June 29, and for every day before that date the repairs are finished, the contractor will receive $200,000. However, for every day after June 29 that the highway is not completed, the contractor will owe $200,000, Haus said.

The interchanges from eastbound Interstate Highway 80 to eastbound Interstate Highway 580 and from westbound Interstate Highway 80 to southbound Interstate Highway 880, were damaged after a tanker truck crashed and exploded early Sunday morning, which caused the collapse of the freeways, according to Caltrans.

Bay City News

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Upscale econo-airline JetBlue now serving San Francisco International Airport

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Photos by John Han
Sentinel Photographer
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

By Pat Murphy
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

The first flight into San Francisco by JetBlue, touted as the most upscale econo-airline in America, landed at San Francisco International Airport (SFO) yesterday to the strains of a crooner named Bennet and an arching water cannon salute.

Airport officials and San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom greeted passengers.

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Four flights daily from SFO to New York are offered at one-way fare of $164 through June 13, when fares become $189. The company aims at repeat business from those who fly frequently through comfort and attentive staff.

Phillip Pastor was the first JetBlue passenger off the airline to set foot in SFO. Pastor flew JetBlue for his firs time on recommendation of a friend. Native New York Pastor flies on average twice a month, he told the Sentinel.

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Phillip Pastor

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First time user Phillip Pastor reports, “I thought it was a fantastic plane. It was very smooth and it was very comfortable. The flight crew were great but it was actually the smoothest plan I’ve ever been on and I fly quite a bit.”

Passenger legroom is from 32-inches to 34-inches depending on flight and all seats are leather with seatback for every passenger offering satellite movies and television.

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Richard Garbarino, Mayor of South San Francisco seen at right, joins San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom, left, with gentlemen preferring expansive leg room

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RIGOLETTO – SF OPERA Broadcasts on Classical 102.1 KDFC

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By Seán Martinfield
Sentinel Fine Arts Critic
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

San Francisco Opera and radio station Classical 102.1 KDFC are joining forces again this Sunday in a broadcast of the 2006 production of Verdi’s RIGOLETTO. The program airs at 8:00 PM free of commercial interruption. Fast on the heels of David Gockley being installed as San Francisco Opera’s General Director, Jeannik Méquet (Mrs. Edmund W.) Littlefield handed its Board a no-strings-attached gift of $35 million dollars. Everyone agreeing it came just in time, the endowment represents a loud and clear signal to The City’s cultural benefactors that SF Opera is on its way back into the Major Leagues. A dramatic demonstration of Mr. Gockley’s community outreach and forward thinking happened on Friday night, October 6, 2006 with the free simulcast of Verdi’s RIGOLETTO in Civic Center Plaza and at Stanford’s Frost Amphitheater. The event proved to be an artistic wonderment and a state-of-the-art technological triumph.

Given the several cameras placed throughout the War Memorial Opera House, the thousands of lucky outside viewers were gifted with a continuous flow of multi-varied angles, fabulous close-ups, long-shots and split-screen combinations. The House microphones carried the voices through a digital sound board which then became a balanced mix pushed through a “curvilinear array” of MILO speakers spewing-out gargantuan stereophonic separation to everyone gathered midst the sanctuary of trees decked with lit candelabra – everything under the glow of an illusive Harvest Moon. The viewers inside the Opera House, however, saw and heard something somewhat different.

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RIGOLETTO – Broadcast at Civic Center Plaza, 10-06-06. Photo by Jon Han

The overall stage direction of Harry Silverstein was static, occasionally frozen, non-sensical and very often without reason or purpose. It was the common sense and fabulous musicianship of an extraordinary cast that linked us to the plot and our understanding of particular plights and collective mania. Paolo Gavanelli’s magnificent and unqualified ownership of the role of “Rigoletto” is engrained into his body, being many times tried / tested / and proven. Gavanelli is internationally recognized and spoken of as the “Rigoletto of our generation”.

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Mary Dunleavy (Gilda) and Paolo Gavanelli (Rigoletto). Photo by Terrence McCarthy

Many opera singers sustain international careers, some for decades by repeating best and most-suited roles in a variety of houses on every continent. Performers of this stripe – along with their producers, fellow musicians, co-stars and loyal fans – understand fully the grueling demands of roles such as “Rigoletto” and everyone’s #1 priority being about The Voice. Following his SF Opera engagement Mr. Gavanelli repeated the role at the Vienna State Opera with tenor Marcus Haddock as the “Duke of Mantua”, also seen as “King Gustav” in Verdi’s UN BALLO IN MASCHERA. (KDFC broadcast scheduled for Sunday, September 2nd.) This past March he teamed with tenor Joseph Calleja under the baton of Friedrich Haider at the Bavarian State Opera. It is reasonable to assume Gavanelli’s vocal performance and stage business remains more or less the same. After all, a high-ranking, politically savvy, middle-aged court jester with a prominent hump on his right shoulder most certainly moves about in a consistent manner and (probably) retains a smart tailor.

Surrealist painter Giorgio di Chirico’s “The Mystery And Melancholy Of A Street” influences the production’s lefts and rights, stops & gos. The painting provided the basis for Michael Yeargan’s set design first seen in 1997, revived in 2001, and – budgetary catastrophes being what they were for SF Opera’s previous administration – dragged out one more time for 2006. As with Chirico’s canvas, Yeargan’s set is indeed both a mystery and melancholic piece of work. Perhaps “Monterone” can find an appropriate curse for it and David Gockley a hugely-jawed sharp-toothed shredder.

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Designs of Giorgio di Chirico and Michael Yeargan. Photo by Terrence McCarthy

Greer Grimsley’s credibility as “Monterone”, pronouncer of Rigoletto’s fatal curse, is empowered by his helden (or “heroic”) variety of baritone. Grimsley’s voice is both immensely ferocious and pointed, gliding with ease throughout the stretch of his register. As lightning flashes from above, the towering baritone becomes a whirlwind of hellish fury as he conjures his curse of retribution – casting a spell of horrific vengeance upon the licentious Duke, even swearing to haunt him as a spectral terror, for having violated his daughter and despoiling the honor of his Family. Rigoletto mocks the daughter’s fate and accuses the nobleman of boring the court with his tiresome speeches. Monterone then launches his fury towards Rigoletto, extending to him the same fateful curse. Rigoletto is visibly shaken. And so are we. Greer Grimsley is an electrifying performer, endowed with Teutonic vocal strength and a compelling manner. This August he flies off to Seattle where he takes on the title role in Wagner’s DER FLIEGENDE HOLLANDER.

Another surprise in the supporting cast is Adler Fellow Eugene Brancoveanu as “Marullo”. In the first three scenes of Act 1 we are introduced to the Men’s Chorus, “Rigoletto” and the “Duke of Mantua” – this season sung by Albanian tenor Giuseppe Gipali. By page 5 of the score, Verdi gives his Leading Tenor a fairly challenging aria, “Questa o quella”, with barely a chance to warm-up and packed with High A-flats. Whatever our initial response to both Gavanelli and Gipali – along with the soothing bass-baritone of Jeremy Galyon as “Count Ceprano” (cuckolded that afternoon by the Duke and with the “Countess” blushing just slightly nearby) – Eugene Brancoveanu suddenly pricked up our ears. Come scene 4 and Brancoveanu’s “Marullo” positing that the deformed “Rigoletto” is keeping a mistress – the proscenium arch was suddenly buzzing with resonance. Mr. Brancoveanu sports a strong and beautiful baritone voice that is also startlingly clear, very aggressive and seductive.

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EUGENE BRANCOVEANU and GREER GRIMSLEY

Giuseppe Gipali, as the “Duke of Mantua”, is gifted with a fine lyric tenor, beautiful phrasing and – with the assistance of Friday Night’s sound engineer and two huge towers of stadium-size speakers bouncing his voice against the granite and marble palace walls of the Civic Auditorium, the Federal Building, City Hall and the Asian Art Museum – a fine set of performance chops that seem to qualify him as a stand-in for Pavarotti. Perhaps to the folks outside, but not inside at the San Francisco War Memorial Opera House and its space for 3300 ticket holders.

In 2005, Gipali sang 3 performances as the “Mantua” with Conductor Zubin Mehta at the Munich State Opera. Its total sound-absorbing body count – 1773 seats, 328 standing – amounts to two-thirds at the War Memorial. We can assume the critics did not go after Giuseppe Gipali’s smallish voice. In the spring of 2006 he sang three performances as “Cavaradossi” in TOSCA at the Opéra de Monte Carlo – 520 seats, located in Monaco’s famed Casino. Less than one-sixth the capacity of the War Memorial. No doubt he delivered an audibly fantastic performance. More than likely, come the duets and ensembles, the assigned leading lady did not drown him out … as did the effortless and shimmering resonance of our compelling and luminous soprano Mary Dunleavy, “Gilda” – innocent daughter of “Rigoletto” and sexual victim of the vain “Duke of Mantua”.

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MARY DUNLEAVY – Curtain Calls at Civic Center Plaza, 10-06-06. Photo by Jon Han

Mary Dunleavy is a stunning example of a strong and flexible lyric soprano. Her upper register is both warm and bell-like, dancing with ease throughout the coloratura of “Caro Nome”, brightening the balance of the famed “Quartet”, poignant and celestial in her final dreams of Heaven. As “Gilda”, Mary Dunleavy displays incredible musicianship and glorifies the art of Bel Canto singing. With simple ease and grace she commands our attention and is a giving companion to her fellow cast members. Mary Dunleavy is a love that is here to stay.

Thank you, Jeannik Méquet Littlefield, for your generous vote of confidence and support of General Director David Gockley’s vision for San Francisco Opera. Bigger budgets allow for bigger opportunities and bigger chances to secure the biggest and the best and – which always means a bigger bang for our bulging or borrowed bucks.

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MARY DUNLEAVY (Gilda) signs Rigoletto Playbill for SEÁN MARTINFIELD. Photo by Jon Han

Next month’s SF Opera broadcast on Classical 102.1 KDFC – Sunday, June 3 at 8pm – Tchaikovsky’s Joan of Arc. Tchaikovsky’s rarely performed work showcases the artistry of mezzo-soprano Dolora Zajick as Joan of Arc, along with tenor Misha Didyk (Charles VII) and baritone Rod Gilfry (Lionel). Donald Runnicles, conductor. Christopher Alexander, director.

See Seán’s recent articles and interviews:
NORMA SHEARER – Headlines the 12th ANNUAL SILENT FILM FESTIVAL
JERSEY BOYS – Smashing Records At The Curran Theatre
DON QUIXOTE – An Impossible Dream at SF Ballet
THE DAMNATION OF FAUST – Absolute Heaven at Davies Symphony Hall
JEANETTE MacDONALD – First Lady of “San Francisco”
ALTAR BOYZ – In San Francisco
An Interview with PASCAL MOLAT – Principal Soloist, San Francisco Ballet
TERRA HAUTE – An Interview with The Stars, John Hutchinson and Elias Escobedo

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San Francisco Sentinel’s Fine Arts Critic
Seán Martinfield
is a native San Franciscan. He is a Theatre Arts Graduate from San Francisco State University, a professional singer, and well-known private vocal coach to Bay Area actors and singers of all ages and persuasions. His clients have appeared in Broadway National Tours including Wicked, Aïda, Miss Saigon, Rent, Bye Bye Birdie, in theatres and cabarets throughout the Bay Area, and are regularly featured in major City events including Diva Fest, Gay Pride, and Halloween In The Castro. As an Internet consultant in vocal development and audition preparation he has published over 2,000 responses to those seeking his advice concerning singing tecniques, professional and academic auditions, and careers in the Performing Arts. If you would like to build up your vocal performance chops and participate in the Bay Area’s rich theatrical scene, visit Broadwaybelters.com, email Seán at seanmartinfield@att.net.

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Jerry Garcia and Grateful Dead memorabilia auction preview begins today

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Head stock on a Jerry Garcia custom made electric guitar by Doug Irwin 1971. Mother of pearl inlay depicting eagle. Some 120 lots of instruments played on stage by the Grateful Dead’s Jerry Garcia are previewed beginning today through May 18 auction.
Photos By John Han
Sentinel Photographer
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

By Pat Murphy
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

Much of the magic of the Grateful Dead goes on auction in a few days, with fans invited to bring recallable memories today for an closeup preview.

Public preview of 120 lots runs until May 18 auction at Bonhams & Butterfields in San Francisco, the third largest art dealer in the world, located 220 San Bruno Avenue.

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Massive banner of Jerry Garcia used at his memorial service in Golden Gate Park, August 13,1995

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Jerry Garcia electric guitar by Travis Bean, circa 1975

Spotlighted in the sale are Jerry Garcia-played instruments. The circia 1975 Garcia electric guitar made by Travis Bean was seen in numerous photos, played on several stages, and used in recording sessions.

As well as memories, acidic or otherwise, fans are advised to bring a fulsome wallet. The Travis Bean electric guitar is expected to bring from $250,000 to $300,000.

In addition to instruments, other memorabilia will be auctioned including clothing, posters, and photos from the era.

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A Boston Celtics jacket signed by team members gifted to Ram Rod by Bill Walton 1980s

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Jerry Garcia acoustic guitar by Alvarez-Yairi and Modulus, 1991. Custom made

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Original album cover “Live Dead” 1969

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Large collection of wine left over from backstage at numerous Grateful Dead concerts, 1970′s-1990′s. Approximately 125 bottles

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A vocal microphone gate opener mat used onstage, 1980s-1990s

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Ram Rod Shurtliff guitars – left and right- 1920′s acoustic guitars by C.F. Martin and Co., center – acoustic guitar by Gibson

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A Ram Rod 12 string Acoustic guitar by Taylor, 1980s

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Gold records

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A Jerry Garcia electric guitar by Gibson. (L-5 S) Circa 1974

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Color photos

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Jerry Garcia color photo. circa 1968

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Jerry Garcia paintings, this one “Footprints in the Sands of Time” signed and limited edition. 1990s

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A Ram Rod Shurtliff Washburn banjo, circa 1980s

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Ram Rod custom made leather jacket

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Ram Rod Harley Davidson Sportster/ Superglide motorcycle, 1971. Background – paintings by Jerry Garcia

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Merry Pranksters/Grateful Dead concert poster. Winterland Ballroom, San Francisco, Oct. 31, 1966

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Project Homeless Connect receives national 2007 Acts of Caring Legacy Award

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Judith Klain, second from left, accepts recognation as Director of San Francisco Project Connect, with Barbara Garcia, Director of San Francisco Community Health Programs within the Department of Health; Barbara Garcia, Director of Community Health Programs, San Francisco Department of Public Health; Colleen Landkamer, President, National Association of Counties (NACo). Seen at far left is Preston V. Lee, Jr, Director Industry Relations for Freddie Mac which sponsored the event

An organization representing the nation’s 3,066 counties has awarded Project Homeless Connect the 2007 Acts of Caring Legacy Award for Excellence and Innovation.

Project Homeless Connect, modeled in 107 American cities, began in San Francisco which is both a City and a County. The program offers centralized services to homeless persons from any public or private organization or individual willing to participate.

The award is giving annually by the National Associations of Counties, founded in 1935, which remains the only national group focused on county governments, needs, and achievements deemed worthy of consideration by other counties.

“We are incredibly honored that the National Association of Counties has recognized our efforts to address the suffering of, and in many cases end, homelessness, efforts that have inspired municipalities across the country” notes San Francisco PHC Director Judith Klain.

“Our program relies on 90% volunteer and in-kind support, and we owe our program’s success to our volunteers and partner businesses.”

Klain, with Barbara Garcia, Director of Community Health Programs, San Francisco Department of Public Health, accepted the award at the April 27th event held in Washington, D.C. NACo and Freddie Mac representatives presented Project Homeless Connect with a crystal award along with a $1,500 contribution.

Used as a national best practice model, San Francisco’s PHC program is now being implemented in 26 states including Oregon, Nevada, Texas, Missouri, New York and Florida. PHC programs are even in place in Canada, Puerto Rico and Australia.

“However, even the original San Francisco program is evolving rapidly, with a first-ever Bayview District event scheduled for Friday, June 8th, 2006,” noted Klain.

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City and San Francisco State University partner to address declining African-American population in San Francisco

From the Mayor’s Office of Communications

Today Mayor Gavin Newsom announced a partnership with San Francisco State’s College of Ethnic Studies to provide research assistance and analysis in support of the City’s effort to preserve the current African-American population and look at ways to attract new African-American residents and businesses.

Over the past several years San Francisco has seen a steep decline in the number of African-Americans. Whilethe decline generally reflects a similar trend experienced in other Bay Area cities and other urban areas around thecountry, the rate of decline in SF exceeds other jurisdictions with similar demographic and characteristics.

“This is an issue of deep concern to my administration,” said Mayor Newsom.

“African-Americans have made and continue to make important contributions to this City so to sit back and watch while their numbers continue todwindle is simply unacceptable.”

District 10 Supervisor Sophie Maxwell notes, “San Francisco is working toward creating a climate that is welcoming and encouraging to African-Americans and that helps to foster African-American businesses.”

The scope of work for San Francisco State will include an analysis of census and other data to get a better pictureof who is leaving and where they are going; it will also include a survey of best practices in other jurisdictions and surveys of current and former African-American residents of the city.

“We felt strongly that we needed a partnership that could bring academic rigor to the research phase and objectivity to the recommendation phase,” said Mayor’s Office of Community Development Director, Fred Blackwell.

“The College of Ethnic Studies is a perfect match on both of those fronts,” added Blackwell.

“San Francisco State is proud to be a part of this important effort,” stated Kenneth Monteiro, Dean of the College of Ethnic Studies.

“We are glad to see that the Mayor’s Office is taking it seriously and we are very excited to be
able to lend our expertise.”

Once the research phase is complete Mayor Newsom and Supervisor Sophie Maxwell will convene a Task Force to work over the summer to look at the data and develop a set of recommendations for the Mayor and the Board of Supervisors.

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BUSINESS: One Brick joins Habitat for Humanity in New Orleans

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San Francisco-headquartered nonprofit, One Brick, is holding its first national volunteer trip, joining the efforts of Habitat for Humanity as it helps rebuild St. Bernard Parish in New Orleans.

Volunteers from One Brick’s four regional chapters, Chicago, New York, San Francisco and Washington, DC will all travel to New Orleans from May 6-11, to spend a week helping with reconstruction projects in one of the areas most affected by Hurricane Katrina.

One Brick sources volunteers for local non-profit organizations by creating a unique social and flexible volunteer environment for those interested in making a tangible difference in the community. The New Orleans project marks the first national project undertaken.

“New Orleans is starting to look forward to a future again, but there is a huge amount of urgent work that still needs to be done,” said Dave Shefferman, Co-founder of One Brick San Francisco.

“Our goal is to bring volunteers together from around the country, so we can assist Habitat for Humanity, at least in a small way, with the vital work they’re doing day in, day out, to help the people of New Orleans.”

Project details:

Volunteers from each of One Brick’s 4 chapters will be joining Habitat for Humanity’s St. Bernard Build Project from May 6 – 11.

They will be staying at, a volunteer camp located in Violet, Louisiana, in St. Bernard Parish. Since June 1, 2006, Camp Hope — formerly W. Smith, Jr. Elementary School — has housed volunteers assisting residents in their recovery from Hurricane Katrina.

Business Wire

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JERSEY BOYS – Smashing Records At The Curran Theatre

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By Seán Martinfield
Sentinel Fine Arts Critic
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

JERSEY BOYS – The Story of Frankie Valli & The Four Seasons landed as a smash-hit success at San Francisco’s Curran Theatre on December 10, 2006. Stepping into the spotlight at the final curtain call, two of the original Jersey Boys – Frankie Valli and Bob Gaudio – another one of those “Only in San Francisco” happenings. The champagne corks must still be flying because the show has been extended through September. JERSEY BOYS and its San Francisco cast – is the singular most amazing piece of entertainment you are likely to find in The City right now and for more seasons to come. There are standing ovations during the acts! The performances are superb, rivaling the original Broadway cast, maybe the Four Seasons. In the guise of a “musical”, JERSEY BOYS is the working definition of Theatre.

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WALK LIKE A MAN – Christopher Kale Jones, Erich Bergen, Deven May, Michael Ingersoll

As Frankie Valli, Christopher Kale Jones has the true vocal chops of a Tenor Pop Star. Warmed up and in full throttle by the introduction of “Sherry“, Jones captures Valli’s signature falsetto with full-calendar authority. Not the heady tones of the vibrato-laden countertenor (or “male soprano”), Christopher’s high Pop/Treble is solid, totally secure, hot and inviting. Jones has the authentic easy-sweet and inviting presence of the edgy and elegant ’60s Lead Pop Singer.

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JERSEY BOYS – Michael Ingersoll, Christopher Kale Jones, Erich Bergen, Deven May

In an entirely other vocal strata, keeping his voice in a normal placement throughout an exquisite solo, “Cry For Me“, Erich Bergen is the perfect choice for the role of songwriter Bob Gaudio. Bergen radiates steady and reserved confidence of the multi-gifted baritone member who claims to not give a damn about “the Jersey neighborhood”, eventually leaving the singer’s spotlight and concentrating on such masterful compositions as “Can’t Take My Eyes Off Of You“.

When Frankie and Bob are finally getting it at that DeVito (Deven May) has ruined them financially, that the big-suited “bosses” are wanting their money, the two come to a private understanding.

Bob Gaudio: [To Frankie Valli] Maybe we should make an investment.
FV: In what?
BG: Us.
FV: What do you mean?
BG: Well, you got the voice. I got the songs.
FV: Yeah, so?
BG: So, we make a partnership. I give you half of everything I write, you give me half of everything you record outside the group.
FV: OK, I’m in.
BG: Great! So, should we like have somebody draw up a contract?
FV: What, you mean sign a piece of paper from a lawyer?
BG: I guess.
FV: You want to do this thing?
BG: Yeah, I just mean….
FV: So we do it! You want a contract? [FV offers his hand to BG.] Here. A Jersey contract. [They shake.] Hey! Things work out – think we could talk about a saxophone?
BG: Hey! If things work out, we can talk about a whole horn section.

This sound of this quartet sparkles because these four singers are matched perfectly. When cut down to a trio for “Stay“, the mellower tones of Michael Ingersoll (as Nick Massi) anchor the flow of the song. Later in Act II, Ingersoll delivers a fabulous monologue in which he details the hygienic habits of the group’s creator, Tommy DeVito – “For ten years!” As the hotel roommate, Nick has endured DeVito’s obsession with usurping every available towel while consuming those teeny bars of soap, yet not changing his underwear for three days while double-ironing his dress shirts. As with the songs, Michael Ingersoll’s monologue received a round of well-deserved applause. Ingersoll’s speaking and singing voice is beautiful; his presence on stage is sturdy, his sense of humor is light and dry. We feel his basic truth for leaving the group – he needs to be a father to his children.

Deven May is brilliant as Tommy DeVito. As the thrust behind the creation of The Four Seasons, the beefy Deven May is clearly “the heavy”, a sort of in-the-ballpark “guido”, with a beautiful baritone voice and a very handsome mug. His character is an obvious schmuck; he is the cause and central core of the group’s hardships – and a classic version of the guy you love to hate. In the group’s early days with DeVito constantly changing its name (including Frankie Castelluccio becoming Frankie Valli) and booking them into every dive and bowling alley, “The Lovers” wind up at a joint called The Four Seasons – its name ablaze in red and blue neon. “Look at that!” declares the awe-struck DeVito. “It’s a sign!”

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JERSEY BOYS – The Four Seasons

JERSEY BOYS is a clear sign that well-written material withstands the Test of Time. The music of Bob Gaudio and the lyrics of Bob Crewe (played by John Altieri) are timeless, straight from the garden, motivating, romantic, danceable and quickly taken to heart. Frankie Valli says Jersey Boys is a taste of reality. “It’s about four guys that grew up in a certain way, in a certain period of time who – with all odds against them – became successful.” It makes total sense when you hear the music of The Four Seasons sung by these four fresh and new equally studly gents. Jersey Boys is not a nostalgic look back, or a PBS fund-raiser, nor an obligatory retro-fitted musical dinosaur demanding attention.

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JERSEY BOYS – The Finale

Bob Gaudoni spoke about a friend who came to see the show and exclaimed, “You know, I think this show is going to be bigger than you guys were.” Gaudoni’s response? “Terrific!”

Given its simple and effective choreography by Sergio Trujillo and under the vital and meticulous direction of two-time Tony Award winner Des McAnuff – JERSEY BOYS is working its “way back to you”.

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TEAM JERSEY BOYS – (left to right) Rick Elice (book), Bob Gaudio (composer), Marshall Brickman (book), Des McAnuff (director)

Jersey Boys has been extended through September 2007. Your eyes will adore them!
To order tickets on-line: JERSEY BOYS

See Seán’s recent articles and interviews:

See Seán’s recent articles and reviews:

LA VIE EN ROSE (La Môme) – Biography of Edith Piaf A Sensation at the 50th San Francisco International Film Festival
SPIDER-MAN 3, An All-American Cinematic Marvel
RIGOLETTO – SF OPERA Broadcasts on Classical 102.1 KDFC
JERSEY BOYS – Smashing Records in SAN FRANCISCO
NORMA SHEARER – Headlines the 12th ANNUAL SILENT FILM FESTIVAL
DON QUIXOTE – An Impossible Dream at SF Ballet
THE DAMNATION OF FAUST – Absolute Heaven at Davies Symphony Hall
JEANETTE MacDONALD – First Lady of “San Francisco”
An Interview with PASCAL MOLAT – Principal Soloist, San Francisco Ballet
TERRA HAUTE – An Interview with The Stars, John Hutchinson and Elias Escobedo

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San Francisco Sentinel’s Fine Arts Critic Seán Martinfield is a native San Franciscan. He is a Theatre Arts Graduate from San Francisco State University, a professional singer, and well-known private vocal coach to Bay Area actors and singers of all ages and persuasions. His clients have appeared in Broadway National Tours including Wicked, Aïda, Miss Saigon, Rent, Bye Bye Birdie, in theatres and cabarets throughout the Bay Area, and are regularly featured in major City events including Diva Fest, Gay Pride, and Halloween In The Castro. As an Internet consultant in vocal development and audition preparation he has published thousands of responses to those seeking his advice concerning singing techniques, professional and academic auditions, and careers in the Performing Arts. Ask him a question on AllExperts.com . If you would like to build up your vocal performance chops and participate in the Bay Area’s rich theatrical scene, e-mail him at: seanmartinfield@att.net.

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Damaged connector to collapsed MacArthur maze open in 7 to 10 days, reports California Governor Schwarzenegger

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File Photo by Bill Wilson
Sentinel Photographer

Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger announced on Wednesday that the damaged connector from Interstate Highway 80 to Interstate Highway 880 in the MacArthur Maze in Emeryville will be fully open to traffic within 7 to 10 days.

Speaking at a news conference in Sacramento, Schwarzenegger said engineers have determined that the lower deck that bore the brunt of the collapse can be repaired and does not have to be scrapped and rebuilt.

In an effort to further speed repairs, the governor issued a directive to the California Department of Transportation to use incentive-based contracts.

According to a press release issued by his office, Schwarzenegger told reporters, “Progress on repairing the collapsed freeway connectors is moving at lightning speed. By creating immediate action and cutting the red tape, traffic will flow sooner, so we can move goods and people and protect California’s economic power.”

Schwarzenegger said, “I thank all of the state agencies and local partners for their quick response and I also appreciate the patience of Bay Area motorists during the repairs.”

The explosion early Sunday morning collapsed a section of Interstate Highway 580 near Oakland onto a lower deck, which was the Highway 80 to Highway 880 connector ramp below, causing the worst Bay Area transportation disaster since the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake.

If all goes according to plan, the two-lane Highway 880 connector ramp will only have been closed for 15 days or less since following the fiery tanker-truck crash.

Bay City News

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STREET VIOLENCE: Dead before the clock strikes midnight

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Police are investigating a homicide that occurred around 10:30 p.m. Wednesday night, San Francisco police dispatch said today.

Officers responded to reports of a shooting at the intersection of 26th and Harrison streets, where they found the victim, dispatchers said. He had been shot and was pronounced dead at the scene of the shooting.

The victim is described at this time as a Hispanic man in his 20s, according to police dispatchers.

Bay City News

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PHOTOGRAPHY – San Francisco prances in line for Conan O’Brien

THROUGH THE LENS OF DAVID TOERGE

SAN FRANCISCO PRANCES IN LINE FOR CONAN O’BRIEN

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Ticket holders waited in line 3 deep and three blocks long to get into the Orpheum Theater May 2, 2007, for the taping of NBC’s Conan O’Brien Late Late Show.

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Ticket holders sporting their favorite hair prance to the back of the line.

FEDERAL PHLOGGING

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Steel workers erect the skeleton of the new Federal Building in downtown SF. photographed January 29, 2004.

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The new federal building sits on the corner of Mission and 6th streets but its visual impact is felt from many blocks around.

It sits there, a cold unfeeling building much like the bureaucracy contained within it’s walls. It seems omnipresent, like the federal government it houses, always there and always watching over it’s people.

Thom Mayne, an LA architect has built a rather impressive structure commissioned by the General Services Administration with a decade old program conceived to eliminate boring, tired, and unimaginative federal buildings across the country. The problem, in my opinion, is that he went way too far in “trying to be imaginative” and doing things for sake of being creative.

The perforated metal skin that covers one half of the south facing side looks like the screen door of an Appalachian shack. I can’t wait to see it in ten years. On the north side, there are vertical, skinny panes of green glass jutting out perpendicular to the actual windows.

Those windows actually open too, a rarity in modern office buildings. Too bad that the view is that of sixth street also known affectionately as the “wine country”. On a good note, the “ Mayne attraction” is very eco-friendly. Gentle breezes flow through the building eliminating the need for air conditioning and the steel panels on the exterior act like a warming blanket enveloping the entire structure.

It just seems to be like the city’s sore thumb building visible from everywhere. Of course, this architectural marvel (said with a slightly sarcastic tone) will soon be completely outdone when those HUGE green glassed towers are completed. It’s beginning to look a lot like Kuala Lumpur in this city. Didn’t there used to be a height limit here?

The Thom Mayne federal building has become an obsession with me. It has turned into a love-hate relationship.

I have tried to photograph it from every conceivable angle but the light is rarely good on it and the security guards don’t like me taking pictures fearing me to be some kind of terrorist. No, not me. I just hate your building. No, I love your building. No, I’m just confused just like they want me.

THE SAN FRANCISCO WAY OF A SUNNY DAY APRIL 28 2007

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If you found yourself wondering where all the people were on Saturday -A great many could be found enjoying the beautiful weather in Dolores Parkwith a City view to match.

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Someone who prefers the shade in the hammock gets a helping hand from another tree dweller.

HOBART BUILDING A SAN FRANCISCO JEWEL APRIL 26 2007

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The HOBART building on Market at Montgomery was designed in 1914 by Willis Polk the leading architect in San Francisco after the Great Quake of ’06. He designed mostly residences with this building being one of his only office structures. Today, it is surrounded by it’s contemporaries but is still seen as a jewel today and is also a national landmark.

GOLDEN GATE PARK EASTER LILY GOOD FRIDAY 2007

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Good Friday 2007 a lily of the Cala variety at San Francisco Golden Gate Park

SPRINTIME FOR PARROTS OF THE SAN FRANCISCO EMBARCADERO

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Spring fever hits the famous parrots of North Beach as two find a little cozy comfort in a tree today near Embarcadero 2.

SUNSET BREAKS THROUGH RAINY DAY AT OCEAN BEACH

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A recent Tuesday at Ocean Beach after a wet afternoon gave way to a beautiful sunset. The man pictured is trying to regain his hold on shredded plastic washed up on the shore.

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When David Toerge left a career in photojournalism that had spanned over twelve years and started in a new direction of commercial photography he blended the editorial style with a more corporate look. David led the way in that new style garnering many awards for his work. Communications Arts has honored him over six times. Based in San Francisco, David shoots projects on location all over the US for various corporations and a multitude of magazines and always brings back great images. He has a keen sense of light, color, and composition and delivers to his clients assignments done with passion. He has climbed bridges hundreds of feet in the air, shot in caves hundreds of feet below, dived with sharks and driven the track with Indy drivers. He has shot earthquakes and firestorms but loves walking the streets with his camera just photographing the everyday life of his city. Visit Toerge Photography at toerge.com, email david@toerge.com, or telephone 415-730-3824

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Medical Examiner confirms suicide by killer of San Francisco Police Officer Bryan Tuvera

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Photo By John Han
Sentinel Photographer
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

A San Francisco medical examiner’s investigation has confirmed speculation that the killer of a San Francisco police officer turned his gun on himself, contradicting original reports that police killed him.

Marlon Ruff, a 33-year-old San Bruno man, used the same gun to kill San Francisco police Officer Bryan Tuvera in a Sunset district garage two days before Christmas last year as he used to take his own life, according to the medical examiner’s report.

Police originally reported that an unnamed officer who followed Tuvera into the garage had shot Ruff in the head.

The shooting occurred at about 8:15 p.m. after police followed Ruff into the garage of an occupied home in the 1600 block of 25th Avenue.

According to police, after leading Tuvera up to the home, Ruff kicked down a side door to the home’s garage and ran inside. When Tuvera followed Ruff through the broken door, Ruff opened fire on him, fatally striking Tuvera, 28, in the head.

Another officer came through the door and opened fire, but it was the bullet from Ruff’s gun that led to Ruff’s death. He was pronounced dead at the scene.

According to state prison officials, Ruff was wanted for escaping a minimum-security work camp in Humboldt County. He was rated a low security risk even though he was convicted of a violent armored car robbery.

Bay City News

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