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ALL STAR WEEK FANFEST SINGING CONTEST – Saturday Afternoon – ‘Take Me Out To The Ball Game’ – Do You Sing It Best?

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Giants fans, mighty pee wee sluggers, and tigress baseball moms canvass all three floors of Moscone Center West Friday for home-based Italian eats squat proud between the peanuts and crackerjacks, Giants clothing from toddler tiny to mega-manly, souvenir range challenging the imagination, and photo ops with star quality Giants heroes.
PHOTOS BY DAVID TOERGE
Sentinel Photography Editor
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

SUMMER IN THE CITY

BY PAT MURPHY
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel
As the San Francisco Bay Area fills with strains of ‘Take Me Out To The Ballgame,’ any exacting soul who thinks they sing it best can have their spotlight Saturday afternoon.

Vocal lineup begins at 1:30 p.m. in Moscone Center West, 4th and Howard Streets, turned completely since Friday into a monument to the American Sport crowned with devotion to The Home Team — The San Francisco Giants.

Songsters will face competition from around the globe to best belt-out that American Song mastered even trans-species.

Or spectate the American Way.

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The Poofeit men demonstrate time tested warm-up for the Big Game to begin, energizing themselves Friday at Moscone Center West. Veteran fans from left, Anthony, five-years-old; Anthony, eight-years-old; Nickolas, seven-years-old; and dad John Poofeit.

Moscone FanFest doors are open from 9:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. with Saturday attractions including:

All day: Free appraisals of sports memorabilia.

10:00 a.m.: Mascot Home Run Derby

11:30 a.m.: “Rules of the Game” umpiring clinic

1:00 p.m.: Artist Stanley Silver paints a Willie Mays mural

1:00 p.m.: Beep Ball, baseball for the visually impaired

1:30 p.m.: “Take Me Out to the Ballgame” singing contest

3:00 p.m.: Wheelchair softball exhibition

5:00 p.m.: “Art of playing catch” throwing clinic

5:30 p.m.: Appearance by former players of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League

Major League Baseball legends signing autographs Friday included Jeffrey Leonard, Vida Blue, Bill Laskey, Dave Kingman, Mike McCormick, Rollie Fingers, Bob Feller, and Tito Fuentes.

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John Kanuit displays a 1923 World Series Bat used and signed by Babe Ruth to Joe and Marty Pedlowe. The bat is estimated to be worth between $150,000 and $200,000. It will be auctioned by Hunt Auctions Inc. on Tuesday at 10:00 a.m. Also up for auction is a 1955 Ted Williams Jersey, a 1921 Ty Cobb Bat, 1958 Willie Mayes jersey and a bat fused by Ted Williams during his last season. More descriptions and photos can be seen at www.huntauctions.com

Young fans learned Friday how empires are trained and strutted pee wee prowess.

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Jimmy Dolan, five-years-old, tries to make a catch but was distracted at the last second by an inconsiderate Sentinel photographer.

FanFest attractions run through the Tuesday All Star Game set for player introductions at 5:13 p.m. and gates opening at 2:00 p.m.

The week done in American Comfort.

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JK Mills and his friend Dionne Rivers catching up on a little Play Station while relaxing in style.

DON’T FORGET US

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PAT MURPHY
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
In his youth, Pat Murphy worked as a General Assignment reporter for the Richmond Independent, the Berkeley Daily Gazette, and the San Francisco Chronicle. He served as Managing Editor of the St. Albans (Vermont) Daily Messenger at age 21. Murphy also launched ValPak couponing in San Francisco, as the company’s first San Francisco franchise owner. He walked the bricks, developing ad strategy for a broad range of restaurants and merchants. Pat knows what works and what doesn’t work. His writing skill has been employed by marketing agencies, including Don Solem & Associates. He has covered San Francisco governance for the past ten years. Pat scribes an offbeat view of the human family through Believe It or What.

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DAVID TOERGE
Sentinel Photography Editor
When David Toerge left a career in photojournalism that had spanned over twelve years and started in a new direction of commercial photography he blended the editorial style with a more corporate look. David led the way in that new style garnering many awards for his work. Communications Arts has honored him over six times. Based in San Francisco, David shoots projects on location all over the US for various corporations and a multitude of magazines and always brings back great images. He has a keen sense of light, color, and composition and delivers to his clients assignments done with passion. He has climbed bridges hundreds of feet in the air, shot in caves hundreds of feet below, dived with sharks and driven the track with Indy drivers. He has shot earthquakes and firestorms but loves walking the streets with his camera just photographing the everyday life of his city.

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JESSE JACKSON leads San Francisco Western Addition rally Sunday against street war zone

STREET VIOLENCE: SAN FRANCISCO LEADERSHIP METTLE

See Related: Street Violence

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The Reverend Jesse Jackson visits the San Francisco Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial June 28 with San Francisco District Attorney and San Francisco Third Baptist Church Pastor Amos Brown.
Photos by Bill Wilson
Sentinel Photographer
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

The Bay Area has become a war zone, according to a local community group, and something has to be done about it.

That’s the reason concerned San Francisco residents will join Reverend Jesse Jackson at a community rally on Sunday in San Francisco’s Western Addition.

Jackson plans to attend a call for peace at Ella Hill Hutch Community Center at 1050 McAllister St. at 2 p.m.

His planned visit is a response to the violence that claimed more than a dozen lives in the Bay Area last weekend.

The recent spike in violence has some locals saying enough is enough.

“There were more people killed in the Bay Area this weekend than U.S. soldiers in Iraq,” said Kevin Bard, a San Francisco State University political science student and intern of the CLAER Project, a community group that helps families of violence victims and promotes peace on San Francisco streets.

“We’ve seen more coverage of Paris Hilton’s criminal activity than on the war on our streets,” Bard added.

Two early homicides in Oakland kick-started a weekend of violence that included four killings each in San Francisco and Oakland and more in Richmond and unincorporated North Richmond.

Some blame the rise in homicides on hot, agitating weather and on more youths on the streets during the summer school break. Others are citing lack of legislation geared at stopping violence as the reason for increased bloodshed.

“We as a society had a fleeting moment of attention on this contributing gun violence as a result of the Virginia Tech incident,” said Sharen Hewitt, The CLAER Project’s executive director.

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Sharen Hewitt

“This incident vanished from the headlines and in the continued silence, weapons of mass destruction continue to proliferate inner-city neighborhoods while the NRA (National Rifle Association) goes unchallenged, and our youth are now more likely to have access to a gun than to a one-day pass to an amusement park.”

Some legislation that will be on topic in the call for peace this Sunday: A redirection of federal war spending and the adoption of a comprehensive urban agenda; increased emphasis on gun control at the state level, including annual gun registration; and the development of a comprehensive five-year plan to address violence in San Francisco, and a commitment in the City’s budget to prioritize violence beyond the police.

See Related

JESSE JACKSON reflects at San Francisco Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial on King Assassination and American children lost every year to gun violence

Bay City News

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BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Bill Wilson is a veteran freelance photographer whose work is published by San Francisco and East Bay media. Bill embraced photography at the age of eight. In recent years, his photos capture historic record of the San Francisco LGBT community in the Bay Area Reporter (BAR). Bill has contributed to the Sentinel for the past two years.

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VIDEOGATE OFFICER should not have been removed from work, Appellate Court rules

A San Francisco police officer who created a controversial video parody three years ago should not have been temporarily suspended from his job, a state appeals court ruled today.

The Court of Appeal ordered the city to reimburse Officer Andrew Cohen for the four days of pay he lost during his suspension from Dec. 8 to 16, 2005.

The court said Police Chief Heather Fong didn’t follow the Police Department’s own rules when she suspended Cohen because those rules allow temporary suspensions without a hearing only in “exigent” or emergency situations.

A three-judge panel of the appeals court said the video did not create an exigent situation endangering the Police Department’s ability to protect the public.

Justice Sandra Margulies wrote, “In our view, temporary suspensions may not be used a shortcut method of taking punitive action against an officer or as a tool for conducting public relations damage control.”

The video showed skits of uniformed officers responding to mock police calls, including one scene that supposedly showed a homeless black woman who had been hit by a patrol car and another that depicted officers retreating into a massage parlor after avoiding a burglary call.

Cohen described the video as a “comedic parody of Police Department life” that was intended to boost morale, while critics called it sexist, racist and anti-gay.

The officer placed excerpts on a Web site and planned to show the video at a Christmas party for officers at the city’s Bayview-Hunters Point station.

At a news conference on Dec. 7, 2005, the day after they became aware of the video, Fong called the tape “egregious, shameful and despicable” and Mayor Gavin Newsom labeled it “sexist, racist and homophobic.”

Fong temporarily suspended Cohen without pay until a Dec. 14 administrative hearing to determine whether he should remain suspended until the Police Commission ruled on charges that Cohn brought discredit upon the department.

As a result of the administrative hearing, Cohen was returned to his job while awaiting a commission hearing, which has not yet taken place.

Twenty-three other officers who also allegedly participated in the video were also reinstated in their jobs.

Harry Stern, a lawyer for Cohen, called the ruling “fantastic.” He said in addition to getting back his four days of pay, Cohen will ask a Superior Court judge to require the city to pay his attorney’s fees.

Matt Dorsey, a spokesman for City Attorney Dennis Herrera, said the ruling is “not a blockbuster” and said Herrera doesn’t plan to appeal to the California Supreme Court.

Bay City News

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CITY SUPERVISORS AND LABOR COUNCIL skeptical of Peskin Muni ballot proposal

By Pat Murphy
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

A ballot measure promising broad reform of Muni ran into opposition Thursday from the San Francisco Labor Council.

The Charter Amendment consolidating power of the Municipal Transportation Authority (MTA) which operates Muni also met serious skepticism from two members of the three-person Rules Committee hearing the proposal.

Supervisor Aaron Peskin authored the proposed City Charter Amendment geared toward voter approval in the November election.

Peskin described the measure as a “broad and sweeping Charter Amendment” while noting he is willing to negotiate several provisions.

The measure “consolidates power and authority within that agency,” reported Peskin.

“It also increases accountability for managers as well as line staff.

“It is a comprehensive, broad sweeping Charter Amendment that, in addition to establishing carbon emission reduction goals, works to increase money to the MTA.

“It also increases accountability for managers by requiring pay to be linked to performance.

“It removes the salary cap for operators to give management leverage at the bargaining table in conjunction with our transit operators.

“It has a series of provisions including but not limited to two-year budgeting, giving the MTA the ability to float their own revenue bonds, and I’m happy to go through it line-by-line,” stated Peskin.

A Labor Council spokesman quickly scored the measure in four areas.

“The total amount of power that is going to be taken out of the hands of the Board of Supervisors and put in the hands of the MTA, which is an appointed body as opposed to an elected body, concerns us,” objected San Francisco Labor Council Executive Director Tim Paulson.

“The proposition… about the 10% of people who would not be working under a collective bargaining agreement is extremely worrisome to us.

“Anything you can think of around (Muni supervisor) favoratism and supervisors picking who they want to get into these types of jobs are at the core of some the trade union values that we all have here.

“The whole idea of all of a sudden… to have that kind of money taken out of the General Fund and just sliced right back into Muni does not seem to be the approach that needs to be taken because, whether it’s $25 million or $30 million or whatever the estimates are, what other programs are going to be suffering based on that type of set-aside,” said Paulson.

Rules Committee Chair Tom Ammiano expressed doubt the measure would make Muni run better. Supervisors Sean Elsbernd and Jake McGoldrick sit as committee members.

“I’m of the mind now that these are a lot of bells and whistles,” observed Committee Chair Tom Ammiano.

“I’m not quite sure how they’re going to land in terms of efficacy or really going to make Muni run better even though I know the intent is there.

“As it exists now the amendment would increase at-will employees from 1.5% to 10%, about 500 people at-will?” Ammiano asked Peskin, concerned with the increase of employees who could be terminated without cause.

Peskin is willing to negotiate the number downward, he responded.

“In discussions with various units of labor I indicated that was the outside of the envelope and and subject to continued discussions — certainly willing to revise that downward.”

Ammiano also expressed concern over ballot proposal removal of the San Francisco Civil Service Commission from oversight of Muni.

“The authority would be transferred to a MTA Commission but I would respectfully say the following which is you look at personal service contracts — I defy anybody to tell me that the Civil Service Commission does not approve 99.9% of them so I don’t know what the difference is — this not a deal killer for me.

“I don’t know that there is any practical difference but I am open to change.”

But, “The Board of Supervisors would lose oversight over Prop J (previous consolidation of Muni oversight)?,” noted Ammiano.

“That would be transferred to the MTA but the Board would retain its powers under Section 9.118 of the Charter and would still be charged with approving any contract in excess of $10 million in cost in ten years in duration or $1 million in revenue,” Peskin answered.

“Well, I could drop the bread crumbs on that one,” retorted the chairman.

Some $25 million in the City’s General Fund would be transferred to the MTA under the proposal as currently written, raising the specter diminished funding for other City services, drawing Ammiano focus.

“I know some senior folks rely on that option (for City service funding),” Ammiano continued.

“It’s definitely a policy call,” stated Peskin, “it’s a policy call about moving additional funds from the General Fund to Muni.

“The current division of money, 40% goes to MTA, 20% goes to aging adult services, 40% to the General Fund — this would transfer that 40% that goes to the General Fund to the Muni where it would be to the benefit of individuals who use our Municipal Railway and they come from every economic strata in San Francisco.

“In the future as revenues grew from the parking fines in time, all of the up-side would inure to the benefit of the agency.

“So that in 2008-2009 you would see a reduction of General Fund revenue in approximately the amount of $26 million.”

“And Muni gets the unilateral authority for parking fines?” inqured Ammiano.

“That is correct,” said Peskin.

“Not only parking fines,” interjected Supervisor Jake McGoldrick,”but indeed parking rates, parking fees — all of that would then be taken away from the Board of Supervisors — is that correct, MTA would take control of all of that?”

“That is the proposal,” Peskin responded.

McGoldrick questioned giving power to appointed officials over elected officials.

“I think the electorate for the elected officials to be able to weigh in as opposed to appointed officials that are appointed through the executive office, that being the Mayor’s Office whether it’s this mayor or any other mayor.

The proposal gives “incredible powers of authorization… to appointed officials who are basically unknown figures to the general public and I think that’s a very, very important matter that’s put before us.”

“My retort to that,” noted Peskin,” through the chair to Supervisor McGoldrick is that this would be a policy position which the voters could elect to adopt or not.

“It certainly bestows great powers on the MTA Commission.”

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PAT MURPHY
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
In his youth, Pat Murphy worked as a General Assignment reporter for the Richmond Independent, the Berkeley Daily Gazette, and the San Francisco Chronicle. He served as Managing Editor of the St. Albans (Vermont) Daily Messenger at age 21. Murphy also launched ValPak couponing in San Francisco, as the company’s first San Francisco franchise owner. He walked the bricks, developing ad strategy for a broad range of restaurants and merchants. Pat knows what works and what doesn’t work. His writing skill has been employed by marketing agencies, including Don Solem & Associates. He has covered San Francisco governance for the past ten years. Pat scribes an offbeat view of the human family through Believe It or What.

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STREET VIOLENCE: Man shot six times in front of Ferry Building

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A man in his mid-20s who was shot six times in front of the Ferry Building on Wednesday night sustained non-life threatening injuries, police said today.

Two other victims, who were attacked after seven suspects allegedly initiated a physical brawl with the victims, also suffered non-life threatening injuries, according to police.

The three victims were sitting and drinking when the seven suspects approached them, according to a police report.

The second victim was allegedly whipped with a pistol, and a bullet allegedly grazed the third victim’s back, according to police.

No arrests have been made and police continue to search for the suspects.

Bay City News

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INSIGNIFICANT OTHERS – Opens at The Zeum Theater July 14th

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By Seán Martinfield
Sentinel Fine Arts Critic
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

INSIGNIFICANT OTHERS is an original musical by San Francisco composer and lyricist, L. Jay Kuo. This romantic comedy follows the stories of five friends—Margaret, Jeannine, Kristen, Jordan and Luke—who move to San Francisco from the Midwest. Through hilarity and heartbreak, the friends rediscover the bonds they have to one another.

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INSIGNIFICANT OTHERS – at the Zeum Theater

INSIGNIFICANT OTHERS began as a staged reading in May of 2005 in San Francisco. Following that reading, ISO received an AIRspace (Artist in Residence) award from the Jon Sims Center for the Arts, where it underwent its second workshop. In October of 2005, ISO received a prestigious Theatre Bay Area CA$H grant and staged four workshop performances at the Jon Sims Center in January of 2006.

The workshops caught the attention of San Francisco’s New Conservatory Theatre Center, and in July of 2006, it played to sold-out houses for five straight weekends during the summer of 2006 as part of NCTC’s in-concert series, under the direction of George Quick. ISO was awarded Best Original Musical Script by the Bay Area Theatre Critics Circle for 2006.

On July 14, 2007, ISO returns to the stage at Yerba Buena’s Zeum Theatre, in the heart of San Francisco’s Arts District. The show roars back with an expanded cast, live band, and full commercial production. Get behind the scenes at their blog at: “The Making of a San Francisco Musical”.

To order tickets on-line: INSIGNIFICANT OTHERS
Check out the show: Songs & Videos, “Insignificant Others”
Meet the Artists: Cast & Crew: Cast & Crew, “Insignificant Others”

See Seán’s recent articles:
NORMA SHEARER – Headlines the 12th San Francisco International Silent Film Festival
NEIL SEDAKA and PATTI LUPONE – Summer in The City at Symphony Hall
IPHIGÉNIE EN TAURIDE –Everything old is new again at SF Opera
NAN KEMPNER –de Young Museum Presents Couture Collection
JERSEY BOYS – Earth Angels invade Curran Theatre! Cast #2: Their Eyes Adore You!
JEANETTE MacDONALD – First Lady of “San Francisco”
DER ROSENKAVALIER – A Viennese Bon-Bon At San Francisco Opera
DAVID GOCKLEY’S “DON GIOVANNI” – Semper Fi!
HIROSHI SUGIMOTO – Retrospective of photographer’s work at the de Young Museum, July 7th – September 23rd
SPIDER-MAN 3, An All-American Cinematic Marvel
SAMSON vs DELILAH at AT&T Park – Can Stadium Survive Biblical Shearing?
LA VIE EN ROSE (La Môme) – Biography of Edith Piaf – A Sensation at the 50th San Francisco International Film Festival
An Interview with PASCAL MOLAT – Principal Soloist, San Francisco Ballet

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San Francisco Sentinel’s Fine Arts Critic Seán Martinfield is a native San Franciscan. He is a Theatre Arts Graduate from San Francisco State University, a professional singer, and well-known private vocal coach to Bay Area actors and singers of all ages and persuasions. His clients have appeared in Broadway National Tours including Wicked, Aïda, Miss Saigon, Rent, Bye Bye Birdie, in theatres and cabarets throughout the Bay Area, and are regularly featured in major City events including Diva Fest, Gay Pride, and Halloween In The Castro. As an Internet consultant in vocal development and audition preparation he has published thousands of responses to those seeking his advice concerning singing techniques, professional and academic auditions, and careers in the Performing Arts. Ask him a question on AllExperts.com . If you would like to build up your vocal performance chops and participate in the Bay Area’s rich theatrical scene, e-mail him at: seanmartinfield@att.net.

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GREEN BUILDING EXCHANGE opens Redwood City office

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Click on image to visit Green Building Exchange

REDWOOD CITY, Calif.– Green Building Exchange, a year-round center dedicated to vendors who adhere to environmentally friendly building practices, is celebrating its Grand Opening on Saturday, July 28, from 10 a.m. through 3 p.m. at 305 Main Street in Redwood City.

The public is invited to tour the 55,000 square foot marketplace facility and check out vendors who have already become part of this timely and ambitious enterprise. In addition to learning first-hand about everything from solar panels to bamboo flooring, energy-saving coil bulbs, and water-saving irrigation systems, Green Building Exchange will also feature organic wine, nibbles and informative presentations by experts in the green building industry.

Green Seed Radio, hosted by Ginnie Waters and heard every Saturday, 2-3 p.m. on 960AM “The Quake,” is broadcasting live from the event. Green Seed Radio, produced by Green Building Exchange, is the first commercial radio show dedicated to green building and the environment. For more information, or to participate in this program, call Green Building Exchange at 650-369-4900 email info@greenbuildingexchange.com.

“We feel the time is right for this kind of marketplace, providing the information on every aspect of the current wave of interest in sustainable communities,” said Michael Schaeffer, President and CEO of Green Building Exchange.

“As someone associated with the construction business, I was quick to realize that there was a tremendous interest in environmental friendly construction, but there was no single source that could provide information on all aspects of the industry. Hopefully, we’ll fill that need here with the opening of Green Building Exchange.”

SPEAKERS

Eric Corey Freed, founder of organicARCHITECT, recognized for the tradition of Organic Architecture first developed by Frank Lloyd Wright, will share his approaches to organic and ecological design; visionary architect Sym Van Der Ryn will address ways that design, project planning, education and public access to ecological principles make green building a viable solution to our global challenges; Sustainable Spaces founder, Matt Golden, who was highlighted on NBC’s “The Ellen DeGeneres Show,” addresses a holistic system of identifying improvements in comfort, air quality and energy efficiency in the home; Green Builders of Marin founder, John Shurtz, will discuss healthy approaches to renovation, reuse of materials in building, and structurally sound building practices; and Scott Fossel, from Green Century Institute, will look at the vision of a whole system approach to ecological and economical urban development. GCI is a founding sponsor of the upcoming 2008 Eco City World Summit in San Francisco.

About Green Building Exchange

Green Building Exchange acts locally to impact the green movement nationally.

Created in the spirit of social entrepreneurship, Green Building Exchange is a one-stop marketplace for businesses and individuals committed to and working in sustainable buildings. Because of the enormous energy behind the ecological movement in communities, homes and commercial enterprise, Green Building Exchange is committed to educating the public and supporting building and design professionals to increase their expertise in greening their products, trade and approach to building.

GBE welcomes and encourages all green industry professionals to showcase their products and services. Acting on the synergy of its exhibitors, educators, building professionals and the public, GBE acts as a networking hub, a year-round tradeshow, and a platform for education, conferences and the expansion of local and commercial commerce in the sustainable building market.

About Green Seed Radio

Hosted by Ginnie Waters, this informative and entertaining show is the first program of its kind to broadcast on commercial radio, exploring the green building industry and providing homeowners and business professionals with insight and information on building and living green.

Business Wire

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PERMITTING SAN FRANCISCO SUPERVISOR ED JEW to remain in office during years of criminal prosecution a terrible injustice, City Attorney Dennis Herrera asserts

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City Attorney Dennis Herrera
Permitting San Francisco Supervisor Ed Jew to remain in office possibly for years as Jew’s criminal prosecution winds it way through the courts would be a terrible injustice, Herrera said Tuesday.

Lawyers for San Francisco Supervisor Ed Jew filed a reply brief with Attorney General Edmund G. Brown Jr. moments before the close of business Tuesday arguing that City Attorney Dennis Herrera’s quo warranto petition, which seeks permission to sue for Jew’s removal from elective office, be denied.

Among other arguments, Jew’s attorneys contend that the City Attorney’s civil case should be stayed pending the adjudication of criminal charges against the supervisor, who represents San Francisco’s District Four on the Board of Supervisors.

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Supervisor Ed Jew

In response, City Attorney Dennis Herrera issued the following statement.

“The citizens of San Francisco have a right to legitimate representation in their democracy that clearly outweighs the right of one politician to remain in office in violation of the law,” reported Herrera.

“The evidence is overwhelming that Supervisor Jew failed to meet the basic residency requirements to seek or continue to hold his office.

“It would be a terrible injustice if the legitimacy of our Board of Supervisors were to remain in doubt for the duration of a criminal process, which could take years.”

On June 18, 2007, Herrera initiated a legal action to remove Jew from the Board of Supervisors following a four-week investigation that convincingly demonstrated the supervisor’s failure to comply with residency requirements to seek or hold the office under the City Charter.

Under the quo warranto process in the California Code of Civil Procedure, Herrera must petition the Attorney General for permission to sue for the supervisor’s removal in state Superior Court.

Herrera’s response brief is now due to Attorney General Jerry Brown within ten days, by July 13, 2007.

A copy of Herrera’s verified complaint, memorandum of points and authorities, verified statement of facts, and several hundred pages of evidence and declarations collected as part of the City Attorney’s investigation are available on the City Attorney’s website.

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AMERICAN BAR ASSOCIATION to consider climate change, marriage equality at Annual Meeting in San Francisco

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From the American Bar Association

CHICAGO, July 3, 2007— California’s climate change and land use activities, a review of recent national and international legislature for same-sex couples, and a local event drafting wills for eligible San Francisco first responders are among programs of local interest featured at the 2007 American Bar Association Annual Meeting, Aug. 9-14, in San Francisco .

With more than 1,500 top quality legal programs and events, and presentations by the foremost law experts and speakers, including U.S. Supreme Court Justices Stephen J. Breyer and Anthony M. Kennedy, the ABA Annual Meeting is the nation’s premier gathering of legal professionals.

Online registration for news reporters is easier than ever. But register soon, as hotel space is filling quickly! Accredited reporters are welcome to cover the meeting for free. Credential guidelines are at abanews.org/credentials.

On Aug. 11 Justice Breyer will be honored at a noon luncheon by the ABA Rule of Law Initiative for his extraordinary commitment to the promotion of the rule of law in the developing world. He will also be keynote speaker at the event held at the Moscone West Convention Center .

Justice Kennedy will receive the ABA Medal, its highest honor, during the Annual Meeting Opening Assembly on Aug. 11.

The 546-member ABA House of Delegates will meet on Aug. 13 and 14 at the Moscone West Convention Center to consider policy recommendations and vote on resolutions.

Among program highlights of local interest:

“Altared’ States: Effective Strategies for Business Counsel in the Changing Legal Landscape of Same-Sex Couples”

This program will review new national and international laws for same-sex couples. Practical advice to business attorneys on spotting critical issues and providing counsel in an era of legal and tax uncertainty as well as tips for avoiding malpractice liability when advising clients and the implementation of the new laws on a company-wide basis, will be addressed.

Aug. 10, Fairmont San Francisco, Pavilion, Lobby level

“Climate Change and Land Use — California Strategies”

California is leading the way in forging public policies that respond to climate change. Panelists will examine the relationship between land use planning and climate change, with a focus on how California and its localities are taking action in this area.

Aug. 10, Hilton San Francisco, Yosemite Room B, Ballroom level

“Wills for Heroes Event in San Francisco”

The ABA Young Lawyers Division is partnering with the Wills for Heroes Foundation this year to promote its 2007-2008 public service project, Wills for Heroes. Providing support, services, financial assistance and supplies to eligible emergency first responders and their families in the United States , the Wills for Heroes program will be kicking off at the ABA Annual Meeting with an offsite event assisting local first responders.

Aug. 11 from 11 a.m.-4 p.m., San Francisco Fire Department’s Division of Training

“A Holistic Approach to Serving Undocumented Unaccompanied Youth”

More than 8,000 unaccompanied youth flee their home countries for the United States each year to escape life-threatening conditions, and most are forced to navigate our legal system alone. Panelists will discuss the various unique needs of unaccompanied immigrant youth and the challenges practitioners face in assisting them.

Aug. 10, Grand Hyatt, Butron, Theatre level

“17th Annual Margaret Brent Women Lawyers of Achievement Award Luncheon”

This award recognizes and celebrates the accomplishments of women lawyers who have excelled in their field and have paved the way to success for other women lawyers. Among this year’s recipients are Marsha S. Berzon and Angela M. Bradstreet of San Francisco , as well as Roxana C. Bacon of Phoenix , Marva Jones Brooks of Atlanta; and Irma S. Raker of Annapolis , Md.

Aug. 12, Moscone West Convention Center , 3rd floor ballroom

“How to Represent Petey: Animals in Entertainment” Panelists including Tippi Hedren, star of Alfred Hitchcock’s “The Birds” and founder of The Roar Foundation, will address various legal issues relating to animals in the entertainment industry as well as current trends in litigation.

Aug. 11, Moscone West Convention Center , Room 3018, 3rd floor

“Hot Topics in the Commercial & Indian Gaming Industry”

California is a hot bed for gaming law and policy, and affects what is happening in the gaming industry nationally. Local commercial and Indian gaming experts will discuss hot topics in the Golden State .

Aug. 10, Fairmont San Francisco, French Room, Lobby level

Among other programs:

“Historical Trial: Terror in San Francisco : The 1916 Preparedness Day Bombing Trial”

Aug. 9, Moscone West Convention Center , Room 2006, 2nd floor

“Business Litigation Committee/Tort Trial and Insurance Practice Section Public Service Project: ABA Members Volunteering at Local Food Bank”

Aug. 9, San Francisco Food Bank

“Life Sciences & the Law – Hit Fast Forward: Think You Won’t Have a Humanoid Robot When You’re 100? Think Again!”

Aug. 10, Moscone West Convention Center , Room 2024, 2nd floor.

“Domestic Partner Benefits, Rights and Responsibilities: What Every Lawyer Needs to Know”

Aug. 11, Moscone West Convention Center , Room 3018, 3rd floor.

“Land Use Law in California & Beyond with Luncheon Honoring Daniel J. Curtin, Jr, a Walnut Creek , California Resident and Expert Land Use Lawyer”

Aug. 11, Sebastiani Vineyards & Winery, Sonoma , Calif.

“Sex, Drugs, and the Law: The ABA ‘s Response to HIV/AIDS”

Aug. 11, Moscone West Convention Center , Room 3024, 3rd floor

“Where’s the Smart Money in Greenhouse Gases? GHG Lessons for Today”

Aug. 12, Fairmont San Francisco, French Room, Lobby level

“Respect for Same-Sex Couples and their Relationships: Navigating the Hurdles Posed by Lack of Federal and State Recognition”

Aug. 12, Moscone West Convention Center , Room 2002, 2nd floor

“Watch Those Speed Bumps! — Quirky California Laws Often Surprise Lawyers Involved in California-Based Transactions”

Aug. 13, Fairmont San Francisco, Crystal, Lobby level

“Here’s Our Wine List: Issues in Winery Finance; Structuring and Recovering Credit Extensions”

Aug. 13, Fairmont San Francisco, Pavilion, Lobby level

During the Annual Meeting, a press room for working journalists will be set up at the Moscone West Convention Center and will be open for on-site media registration at 8 a.m. on Aug. 9. Thereafter the press room will be open daily from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., and will close one hour after the adjournment of the House of Delegates on Aug. 14.

With more than 413,000 members, the American Bar Association is the largest voluntary professional membership organization in the world. As the national voice of the legal profession, the ABA works to improve the administration of justice, promotes programs that assist lawyers and judges in their work, accredits law schools, provides continuing legal education, and works to build public understanding around the world of the importance of the rule of law in a democratic society.

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USA CENTENNIAL ghosts of 200 years past

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President Ford delivers his speech as Governor Milton Shapp (left of podium) Senate Minority Leader Hugh Scott (to the right of the podium), Susan Ford, and Senator Richard Schweicker.
Photos by Bill Wilson

By Bill Wilson
Sentinel Photographer
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

The ghosts arrived early. The misty dawn had obscured the modern distractions. You could feel the ghosts of two hundred years past. The soldiers who had gathered – the Continental Army – the band of men who camped on these fields in the cold of winter, were watching. Yes, the President would be there, flying in by helicopter, to sign a bill making the area a national park, but in the early morning mist it was the turn of the ghosts.

You could see them on the snow covered redoubts surveying the distant hills for the sign of an expected advance. You could hear them huddled around the campfires cursing the fate that out them in this spot, ill clothed, under fed and facing a superior force. In the stone house that had been Washington’s Headquarters you could hear the echoes of impatience, the concerns of a general in charge of an ill equipped Army dealing with the bureaucracy, the Continental Congress, that seemed incapable of decision.

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President Gerald R. Ford

It was appropriate that the area was a forge but metal wasn’t the only thing that was being forged. The most important thing was a spirit, and attitude that molded men from thirteen colonies into a cohesive unit. That unit persevered and prevailed over a better trained and equipped force. During that cold bitter winter that attitude of positive strength was forged into a force for freedom and liberty.

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President Ford waves to the crowd as he enters his helicopter.

It was to honor that spirit that people from all over the country had gathered that July 4th, two hundred years after the Declaration if Independence had been issued. The bright sun soon lifted the morning mists and the ceremonies marking the United States Bicentennial took place. President Ford delivered a major address, visited a Covered Wagon from Michigan and signed a bill making Valley Forge a National Park. It was only one of many stops for the President on a busy July 4th. His helicopter whisked him in and out on schedule. However the ghosts had come early.

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BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Bill Wilson is a veteran freelance photographer whose work is published by San Francisco and East Bay media. Bill embraced photography at the age of eight. In recent years, his photos capture historic record of the San Francisco LGBT community in the Bay Area Reporter (BAR). Bill has contributed to the Sentinel for the past three years.

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RANDY SHAW beyond silly

BELIEVE IT OR WHAT
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PAT MURPHY
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

Simple as wood… And twice as silly… The BeyondChron.org article penned Monday by editor Randy Shaw… Concluding two of The Gav’s senior staffers are at war

The concept of full disclosure has, this writer thinks, an impertinent quality… But here’s mine…

Shaw made his bones as a Sentinel columnist before launching BeyondChron… This corner would not have learned of Shaw’s site launch had it not been for, oddly enough, Richard Marquez urging Shaw to let this editor know… Marquez, the red book waving, Chris Daly early roommate… I don’t rightly cotton to this man Shaw…

Now, further backdrop… BeyondChron is heralded as filling the accuracy void where the San Francisco Chronicle leaves it… Correcting the Chron, countering it, delivering coverage the Chron is said to intentionally neglect…

Simple As Wood… Shaw lifted quotes verbatim from a Chron story — taking it for granted the quotes are accurate — and concluded the two parties involved are at war… Without asking either party, this corner is told by one party…

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Silly… Shaw epitomizes a silly and insular political belief about the purported power of the press…

The only power of the published word is to lead reader thought during the time a story is read…

That’s it… Particularly in this town — with intelligent and exacting readers — the power of the word ends with the last period…

But jeez, political class inbreders think getting thought into published word actually rises to A Great Matter

Donkey puckey…

Get yourself a glass of water, Shaw… And keep reading the Chronicle…

DEDICATED TO RANDY SHAW AND THE TERTIARY CLASSES

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PAT MURPHY
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
In his youth, Pat Murphy worked as a General Assignment reporter for the Richmond Independent, the Berkeley Daily Gazette, and the San Francisco Chronicle. He served as Managing Editor of the St. Albans (Vermont) Daily Messenger at age 21. Murphy also launched ValPak couponing in San Francisco, as the company’s first San Francisco franchise owner. He walked the bricks, developing ad strategy for a broad range of restaurants and merchants. Pat knows what works and what doesn’t work. His writing skill has been employed by marketing agencies, including Don Solem & Associates. He has covered San Francisco governance for the past ten years. Pat scribes an offbeat view of the human family through Believe It or What.

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TOURISTS BRING highest revenue ever to San Francisco – $7.76 billion

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Given the city’s history and culture, it isn’t hard to imagine what attracted 15.8 million visitors to San Francisco in 2006, but the $7.76 billion earned from tourists in 2006, an all-time high, may be surprising.

As the number of tourists in San Francisco swells each year, the city’s economic profit from tourism continues to increase as well, the San Francisco Convention & Visitors Bureau reported last week.

While the San Francisco visitor industry is doing well now, it had taken a turn for the worse in early 2001 when business travel fiercely declined, and dropped even more following the Sept. 11 attacks.

San Francisco relies on its tourist industry for both taxes and jobs, according to the SFCVB.

“Tourism is the top generator of outside dollars into (San Francisco),” SFCVB President and CEO Joe D’Alessandro said in a statement.

The SFCVB was founded in November 1909 and is a private, non-profit organization that endorses San Francisco as a leisure, convention and business travel destination.

Bay City News

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WILLS AND HARRY organize upbeat July 1 concert remembrance of Princess Diana

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CLICK IMAGE

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See Related: Confessions of a Royal Wedding Watcher – On Scene with Bill Wilson

See Related: Duke Wills and Duchess Kate head off for mystery honeymoon next week – Some whisper ‘Jordan’

See Related: HRH Catherine, The Duchess of Cambridge Biography

See Related: Their Royal Highnesses, The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Are Wed

See Related: Prince Harry: From party prince to Best Man

See Related: Seven Golden Rules for landing your own Prince

See Related: While British hew to tradition, Americans want to feel the love

See Related: Royals Archive

» Don’t miss a thing. Get Sentinel breaking news alerts delivered to your inbox

SENTINEL FOUNDER PAT MURPHY
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Telephone: 415-846-2475
Email: SanFranciscoSentinel@yahoo.com
Photo By Luke Thomas FogCityJournal.com

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New Video Song for Our IDF Soldiers

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SAN FRANCISCO STATE UNIVERSITY among top 20 colleges and universities attracking minority students

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San Francisco State University Photo

A new survey reports that San Francisco State University (SFSU) ranks among the top 20 U.S. colleges and universities when it comes to attracting minority students.

The university 16th among all colleges and universities in awarding undergraduate degrees to minority students, according to results published in the May 31 issue of Diverse Issues in Higher Learning, the university reported.

Results from the survey were taken from U.S. Department of Education statistics compiled from graduation data for the 2005-2006 academic year, officials reported.

SFSU also ranked 10th as a destination for Asian American undergraduates, with the university awards more baccalaureate degrees than any other U.S. university other than the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

SFSU reportedly awarded 2,334 degrees to minority students during the 2005-2006 school year, representing 47 percent of the graduating class.

Annually, SFSU enrolls around 29,000 students and graduates around 7,000, the university reported.

Bay City News

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ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW begins for San Francisco Candlestick Redevelopment

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Candlestick Redevelopment Jamestown Condominiums
San Francisco Housing Authority Image

An environmental impact study has begun on a proposal that would bring a new professional football stadium for the San Francisco 49ers along with homes and businesses to Candlestick Point and the site of former Hunters Point Shipyard, it was announced this week.

Consultant group EIP Associates/PBSJ, which was chosen to conduct the report by the San Francisco Redevelopment Agency, already began formal work on the study last week, according to a spokesman for Lennar Corp., the Miami-based company managing the redevelopment efforts.

The report deadline is mid-2009, the spokesman said.

Along with a new football stadium, the redevelopment would include office space, a mix of market-rate and low-income housing, and two new waterfront communities at Candlestick Point and the site of the former shipyard.

“We have created a plan that provides much deserved housing and economic opportunities for people living in the Bayview Hunters Point neighborhood while providing he 49ers their best option to remain in the city where the team has created so many memories,” said Kofi Bonner, president of Lennar Urban’s Bay Area Division.

“With the start of the EIR, San Francisco has signaled to the community and the 49ers that the redevelopment in these neighborhoods is a priority.”

The conceptual plan would include a shoreline park and trail system combining the best features of Crissy Field and Golden Gate Park, Lennar said. The neighborhoods would feature pedestrian walkways providing direct access to recreational and natural areas.

The development proposal boasts better public transit for football fans and residents, including connections to Caltrain, light rail and bus rapid transit routes, according to Lennar. The plan would also improve traffic flow and parking for game day, the company said.

Bay City News

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STREET VIOLENCE: One Shot at Golden Gate and Taylor Sunday mornning – One stabbed in Washington Square three hours earlier

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The San Francisco Fire Department responded to a shooting on Golden Gate Avenue and Taylor Street this morning, according to a San Francisco Fire Department dispatcher.

The dispatcher said one victim was found at around 2:30 a.m. There
is no information on the victim’s condition.

One man received life-threatening injuries when he was stabbed in the back in San Francisco’s Washington Square Park on Columbus Avenue Saturday at around 11:30 p.m., according to a San Francisco Police officer.

The officer said the man, who was in his 20s, walked several blocks to Powell and Lombard streets where he collapsed after telling bystanders that he had been stabbed.

The injured man was taken to the hospital, and no suspects have yet been identified, the officer said.

Bay City News

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NEIL SEDAKA and PATTI LUPONE – Summer in The City at Symphony Hall

NEIL SEDAKA – BREAKING UP IS HARD TO DO

By Seán Martinfield

The San Francisco Arts Commission and the San Francisco Symphony’s 2007 Summer In The City series enters its final week with concerts on July 27th and 28th. The annual summer music celebration showcases the best of classical favorites, Broadway, and popular music, all in the relaxed elegance of Davies Symphony Hall. Festive decor, dramatic concert lighting, an array of dining options, and nightly lobby entertainment all add to the summer fun. The week features Neil Sedaka in concert on July 27th and Patti LuPone performing her new one-woman show The Lady with the Torch on July 28th.

THE LADY WITH THE TORCH

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NEIL SEDAKA and PATTI LuPONE – Love Will Keep Us Together

It is hard to imagine the history of rock and roll without the many contributions of Neil Sedaka. He is the author of more than a thousand songs, including the classics “Calendar Girl,” “Happy Birthday Sweet Sixteen,” and “Breaking Up Is Hard To Do.” For over four decades, Sedaka’s timeless standards have helped change the face of popular music. With countless hit singles, and platinum and gold records, he is recognized as one of rock and pop music’s legendary pioneers. In celebration of his 50th anniversary in the music business, Sedaka recently released a new CD titled THE DEFINITIVE COLLECTION which features his greatest hits as well as demo recordings and rarities that have never before been available.

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NEIL SEDAKA

Mr. Sedaka’s song-list will include selections from the CD:
Bad Blood
Been There Done That
Breaking Up Is Hard To Do
Calendar Girl
Going Nowhere
Happy Birthday Sweet Sixteen
It Hurts To Be In Love
Junkie For Your Love
Laughter In The Rain
Love Will Keep Us Together
Next Door To An Angel
Oh! Carol
Rainy Day Bells
Should’ve Never Let You Go
Solitaire
Stairway To Heaven
The Hungry Years
The Immigrant
What A Surprise
You

The 2007 Summer In The City series comes to a close when Patti LuPone returns to Davies Symphony Hall to perform “THE LADY WITH THE TORCH” on Saturday, July 28th at 8:00 pm. From Broadway to the big screen, Tony Award winner Patti LuPone has captivated fans with her sensational voice and presence. THE LADY WITH THE TORCH is her one-woman show of moody and romantic ballads: all standards, but rendered in her own inimitable torch-song style, and orchestrated by longtime Stephen Sondheim collaborator Jonathan Tunick. Ms. LuPone last appeared at Davies Symphony Hall performing “Coulda, Woulda, Shoulda” during Summer In The City 2003.

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PATTI LuPONE – C’EST Magnifique

Ms. LuPone’s song-list will include selections on her current CD – THE LADY WITH THE TORCH:
A Cottage For Sale (Willard Robinson/Larry Conley)
Body And Soul (John W. Green/Edward Heyman/Robert Sour/Frank Eyton)
Do It Again (George Gershwin/B.G. DeSylva)
Don’t Like Goodbyes (Harold Arlen, Truman Capote)
Early Autumn (Ralph Burns, Woody Herman, Johnny Mercer)
I Guess I’ll Hang My Tears Out To Dry (Jule Styne/Sammy Cahn)
I Wanna Be Around (Johnny Mercer/Sadie Zimmerstedt)
Ill Wind (Harold Arlen/Ted Koehler)
I’m Through With Love (Gus Kahn/Matt Malneck/Tom Adair)
My Buddy (Walter Donaldson/Gus Kahn)
So In Love (Cole Porter)
Something Cool (Billy Barnes)
The Man I Love (George Gershwin/Ira Gershwin)
The Other Woman (Jessie Mae Robinson)

To order tickets on-line:
NEIL SEDAKA – Friday, July 27th @ 8:00 pm
PATTI LuPONE – Saturday, July 28th @ 8:00 pm

Seán recommends the following:
MP3 Download – NEIL SEDAKA, “The Definitive Collection”
CD – NEIL SEDAKA, “The Definitive Collection”
MP3 download – PATTI LuPONE, “The Lady With The Torch”
CD – PATTI LuPone, “The Lady With The Torch”

JOIN THE SYMPHONY’S VOLUNTEERS

The San Francisco Symphony Volunteer Council (the VC) is an organization of over 1,500 committed, extraordinary volunteers, whose purpose is to support the SFS in areas of fundraising, audience development, and community outreach. Large numbers of volunteers provide services at concerts, visit classrooms as docents, join Symphony Leagues, staff Repeat Performance and the Symphony Store, and work on a rotating basis in the VC office. The volunteer year, along with the Symphony’s fiscal year, begins in September. Some volunteer commitments are year round; others are shorter in duration.

See Seán’s recent articles:

NORMA SHEARER – Headlines the 12th ANNUAL SILENT FILM FESTIVAL
NAN KEMPNER –de Young Museum Presents Couture Collection
IPHIGÉNIE EN TAURIDE –Everything old is new again at SF Opera
JERSEY BOYS – Earth Angels invade Curran Theatre! Cast #2: Their Eyes Adore You!
SPIDER-MAN 3, An All-American Cinematic Marvel
SAMSON vs DELILAH at AT&T Park – Can Stadium Survive Biblical Shearing?
$55 MILLION – This Pacific Heights Mansion Is YOURS!
LA VIE EN ROSE (La Môme) – Biography of Edith Piaf – A Sensation at the 50th San Francisco International Film Festival
An Interview with PASCAL MOLAT – Principal Soloist, San Francisco Ballet

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San Francisco Sentinel’s Fine Arts Critic Seán Martinfield is a native San Franciscan. He is a Theatre Arts Graduate from San Francisco State University, a professional singer, and well-known private vocal coach to Bay Area actors and singers of all ages and persuasions. His clients have appeared in Broadway National Tours including Wicked, Aïda, Miss Saigon, Rent, Bye Bye Birdie, in theatres and cabarets throughout the Bay Area, and are regularly featured in major City events including Diva Fest, Gay Pride, and Halloween In The Castro. As an Internet consultant in vocal development and audition preparation he has published thousands of responses to those seeking his advice concerning singing techniques, professional and academic auditions, and careers in the Performing Arts. Ask him a question on AllExperts.com . If you would like to build up your vocal performance chops and participate in the Bay Area’s rich theatrical scene, e-mail him at: seanmartinfield@att.net.

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CALIFORNIA GREEN CZAR Robert Sawyer fired by Schwarzenegger – Governor says Sawyer moved too slowly – Sawyer retorts independence the issue

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Robert Sawyer
Berkeley College of Engineering Photo

By Pat Murphy
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger pledges a quick replacement for California green czar Robert Sawyer whom the governor fired this week.

Sawyer and Schwarzenegger give differing accounts of the dismissal.

Sawyer, who served at the governor’s pleasure as chair of the California Air Resources Board, took issue earlier this week with Schwarzenegger criticism that the Board was moving too slowly by backing a San Joaquin application for an 11-year extension to meet the Federal Clean Air Act.

Schwarzenegger characterized Board action as letting the federal government off the hook by seeking delay.

For his part, Sawyer responded independence of Board action was the cause of Sawyer’s appointment being rescinded by the governor.

According to accounts, Sawyer sought clarification from Susan Kennedy who serves as chief advisor to the governor.

Kennedy first asked Sawyer to retire, reported Sawyer who declined retirement.

Kennedy then handed Sawyer a letter from the governor rescinding Sawyer’s appointment, according to Sawyer.

Replacing Sawyer is “priority Number One,” Schwarzenegger said through a spokesman.

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PAT MURPHY
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
In his youth, Pat Murphy worked as a General Assignment reporter for the Richmond Independent, the Berkeley Daily Gazette, and the San Francisco Chronicle. He served as Managing Editor of the St. Albans (Vermont) Daily Messenger at age 21. Murphy also launched ValPak couponing in San Francisco, as the company’s first San Francisco franchise owner. He walked the bricks, developing ad strategy for a broad range of restaurants and merchants. Pat knows what works and what doesn’t work. His writing skill has been employed by marketing agencies, including Don Solem & Associates. He has covered San Francisco governance for the past ten years. Pat scribes an offbeat view of the human family through Believe It or What.

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STREET VIOLENCE: Two more shootings – Three more dead

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Officers are searching for suspects today after a violence filled morning left three men dead in two separate homicides.

The first incident was reported to police at 12:18 a.m., a San Francisco police dispatcher said. A man was found shot near the intersection of 16th and 7th streets in the Mission district. He was pronounced dead at the scene.

The second homicide of the morning took place at Fitch Street and Innes Avenue in the Bayview neighborhood, a dispatcher said. Police received reports of a homicide around 4:20 a.m. and reported to the scene where they found two men dead on the side of the road. The cause of death for both men is still unknown.

Bay City News

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MUNI ROUTE CHANGES in effect

THE WORLD FAMED SAN FRANCISCO F-LINE STREETCARS

The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency has announced several traffic and service changes affecting travel in the city, some this weekend and others indefinitely.

On both Saturday and Sunday, the Fillmore Street Jazz Festival will force closure on Fillmore Street from Eddy Street to Jackson Street, beginning at 1 a.m. Saturday and continuing through midnight on Sunday. All intersections except at Washington, Clay and O’Farrell streets will remain open.

Other service changes for Saturday: N-Judah service will travel to Caltrain; J-Church will switch back at Embarcadero Station; K-Ingleside and T-Third will be interlined (K will become the T line inbound at Embarcadero to Balboa Park); Castro shuttles will be restored; and 10-Townsend bus service will be restored for weekend service.

Changes as of Monday: The new 20-Columbus bus service will be introduced and will travel from Van Ness Avenue and North Point to Beale Street and Howard Street, limited hours and weekdays only.

Bay City News

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‘Sicko’ Doesn’t Just Point Severed Fingers

MOVING PICTURES
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By PJ Johnston
Sentinel Film Critic
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

It looks like Michael Moore’s health care polemic “Sicko” is opening to a symphony of praise this weekend, as critics around the country are declaring it his best film yet. Hopefully the prognosis is good for a strong box office, too, because this tough, smart and ultimately hopeful documentary is a movie Americans need to see.

MICHAEL MOORE’S SICKO PREMIERS

Much of the critical acclaim has centered on the fact that “Sicko” may be the liberal muckraker Moore’s best mix yet of comic entertainment and cogent political commentary. (I would argue that 2002’s “Bowling for Columbine” more deftly, and more bravely, added tragedy to Moore’s bag of tricks.) It’s true that “Sicko” moves briskly along, earning guttural laughs and gut-wrenching twists, as it adds layer upon rhetorical layer to the filmmaker’s powerful invective against the for-profit managed health care industry.

BOWLING FOR COLUMBINE

Like all good satirists, Moore has a strong nose for irony, as when he shows us how detainees at Guantanamo receive better health care than 9/11 rescue workers. And like all good comedians, he’s more than willing to dive in for the cheap laughs, as when he brings a group of ailing 9/11 rescue workers to Cuba to seek the high-quality Gitmo medical care.

He’s also developed into something of a master of archival footage – both contemporary and vintage – a mainstay of the modern documentary that Moore skillfully uses to his rousing, and usually hilarious, advantage.

But in “Sicko” Moore manages something even more remarkable than edgy satire: he takes an overwhelmingly complex and seemingly drab subject – how the American fetish for capitalism has left us with the most dysfunctional health care system in the developed world – and makes it approachable. He exposes its basic failings and challenges us to question the wisdom of the system. That’s not to say he covers all the bases – but neither does he betray the fundamental importance of the subject, or allow us to turn our cheek to the humanity at stake.

The secret to Moore’s success is that his films have been a success. That is, they are successfully cinematic in the idiom for which Moore was born: comedy. His movies are funny. He wouldn’t be the champion of the American far left, or the bane of the numbskull right, if they weren’t. People aren’t lining up to see serious documentaries about the devastation of American factory towns, or schoolyard shootings, or even the Bush administration’s deceitful rush to war.

Or at least they aren’t lining up to see serious Michael Moore documentaries. There was always the sneaking suspicion that the edifice of the weighty Moore’s weighty material might collapse if not propped up by all the hot air and bellylaughs.

But “Sicko” is a film that effectively dissects our health care system, shows how we got here and why we couldn’t possibly want to stay here, and even offers glimpses of a better way (namely, in other industrialized nations that take the refreshingly civilized view that adequate health care is a basic civic necessity).

Moore ingeniously takes the everyday frustrations with insurance companies (or doctors, or employers, or government) that we have all experienced at one time or another and establishes a through-line between them and the sob stories he brings to the big screen in “Sicko”; and then he puts it all squarely in the context of a massively screwed-up managed health care system.

Even Moore’s admirers, and I count myself among them, have often complained that his films are long on exposing the failings of the system, and the viciousness of The Man, but short on offering any solutions. “Sicko” is a different sort of Michael Moore film, however.

When he begins exploring the strengths of the Canadian universal health care system, and the British universal health care system, and the French universal health care system – the best in the world – he’s not just making himself a jowly, jovial foil for the flag-waving Patridiots of Fox News and the Republican National Committee. He’s actually opening our eyes to a better way, a reasonable way, to approach sickness and health.

Moore cleverly undermines virtually every scare tactic thrown at the American people whenever the prospect of universal health care is raised, or our system is compared with those of other developed nations. (Choose your own doctor? Check. Wait times short? Check. Quality of care high? Check. Doctors paid well? Check. Not taxed through the wazoo? Check.) But this time he does it not merely to joust with his right-wing foes; “Sicko” actually speaks to us, goes right at our own concerns, our own skepticism, our own experiences.

“Who are we?” Moore asks in “Sicko,” and it is not a rhetorical question. Surely, if we’re the people we claim to the world to be, or even the people know in our hearts we want to be, we can do better than this.

There are plenty of villains in “Sicko,” but they’re not really the focus of Moore’s movie. It’s the heroes that count … if only we could bring them out of each other.

See Related: HEALTH CARE

See Related KISS & MAKE UP – Michael Moore Shows Healthy Respect in San Francisco

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PJ Johnston is president of the San Francisco Arts Commission and a former executive director of the San Francisco Film Commission. He served as Mayor Willie Brown’s press secretary and now runs his own communications consulting firm in San Francisco. A former journalist, he has written about movies for several publications, including the San Jose Mercury News and – long ago, in a galaxy far, far away – for the San Francisco Bay Guardian. Email PJ at pj@pjcommunications.com.

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JUNE 30 PHOTOS OF THE DAY Barry Zito and Friends – VIDEO OF THE DAY – Jersey Boys open game with National Anthem – You can always help someone

Photos of The Day
BARRY ZITO AND FRIENDS
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San Francisco Mayor’s Office staffer Jason Chan, left, with Barry Zito.
Sentinel Photographer
Photos by Bill Wilson
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

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Willie Mayes, right, with Barry Zito.

Video of The Day
JERSEY BOYS OPEN GAME WITH NATIONAL ANTHEM

REALTIME SAN FRANCISCO WEATHER
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JUNE 30 BIRTHDAY LORE
You are self-reliant and indifferent to the opinions of others, thereby sometimes annoying your friends and associates. You are very interested in and sensitive to art and artistic surroundings. You acquire knowledge easily and can impart it to others; this is a rare gift that would make you an excellent teacher.

JUNE 30 IS A BEST DAY
Today is another fine day to pour concrete.

ADVICE FOR JUNE 30
Save your sanity and visit your local carpet store for some padding. Whether your scatter rug is on bare floor or atop another carpet, a thin pad underneath will be safer and saner, plus it will increase the life of your rug.

TIP FOR JUNE 30
We can’t help everyone, but everyone can help someone.

WORD FOR JUNE 30
Barograph. Definition: A recording barometer.

JUNE 30 HISTORY
George Harrison’s “Give Me Love (Give Me Peace On Earth)” topped the charts, 1973. One inch of snow fell during a thunderstorm in Woodstock, Vermont, 1988.

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Saturday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, mostly cloudy through mid morning, then gradual clearing, with a high near 72. West wind between 8 and 18 mph.

Saturday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, increasing clouds, with a low around 53. West northwest wind between 10 and 18 mph, with gusts as high as 23 mph.

Sunday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, then gradually becoming mostly sunny, with a high near 67. West wind between 10 and 16 mph.

Sunday Night: Mostly clear, with a low around 54. West wind between 8 and 16 mph, with gusts as high as 20 mph.

Monday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 71.

Monday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a low around 56.

Tuesday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, mostly sunny, with a high near 78.

Tuesday Night: Clear, with a low around 58.

Independence Day: Sunny, with a high near 80.

Wednesday Night: Clear, with a low around 56.

Thursday: Sunny, with a high near 84.

Thursday Night: Clear, with a low around 56.

Friday: Sunny, with a high near 83.

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PLAN YOUR BEST JUNE DAYS

Begin diet to gain weight: 16, 21, 19, 24

Begin diet to lose weight: 3, 8, 6,10

Begin logging: 1, 3, 4, 27, 28, 30

Breed animals: 22, 23, 24, 25, 26

Castrate animals: 2, 3, 5, 6, 29, 30

Cut hair to discourage growth: 9, 10, 11, 12

Cut hair to encourage growth: 20, 21, 22, 23, 24

Cut hay: 6, 7, 9, 10

Destroy pests and weeds: 6, 7, 9, 10

End projects: 13, 24

Entertain: 15, 15, 28, 19

Go camping: 1, 25, 26, 28, 29

Go to the dentist: 17, 18, 20, 21

Graft or pollinate: 13, 14, 15, 16

Harvest aboveground vegetables: 17, 18, 20, 21

Harvest belowground vegetables: 11, 12, 9, 10

Make sauerkraut, can, or pickle: 4, 5, 7, 8, 13

Plant aboveground vegetables: 16, 17, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26

Plant belowground vegetables: 4, 5, 7, 8, 13

Potty train children: 3, 8, 6, 10

Prune to discourage growth: 6, 7, 9, 10

Prune to encourage growth: 18, 19, 25, 26,

Quit smoking: 3, 6, 8, 10

Set chicken eggs: 2, 11, 12, 13, 19, 27, 31

Set posts or pour concrete: 1, 2, 4, 27, 28, 30

Slaughter animals: 22, 23, 24, 25, 26

Start projects: 15, 26

Wean animals and children: 2, 6, 8, 10

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GIANTS DONATE 800 trees to San Francisco neighborhoods

AT&T PARK SOLAR POWER INSTALLATION ALSO COMPLETED TODAY BY PG&E

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Photos by Bill Wilson
Sentinel Photographer
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

By Pat Murphy
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

San Francisco neighborhoods started becoming greener today as volunteers fanned out to plant 800 trees donated by the San Francisco Giants.

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Mayor Newsom accepted the first tree Friday at Powell and Market.

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“You can imagine the blimps coming in over the Golden Gate,” said Newsom.

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“Over the rolling hills of San Francisco, by Coit tower, down over Lombard Street, to Alcatraz and over the ballpark.”

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Giants Executive Vice President Larry Baer at left.

The donated trees will help Newsom’s City greening plan of 5,000 trees planted in the city every year between 2006 and 2011.

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Meanwhile, the Giants and Pacific Gas and Electric Company today announced the completion of the solar energy system installation at AT&T Park.

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The panels at AT&T Park, the first ballpark in Major League Baseball (MLB) with a solar system, now provide up to 122 kilowatts of renewable energy for PG&E’s customers in San Francisco and throughout its service area.

“The solar installation at AT&T Park is a milestone for all major U.S. sporting venues,” said Peter Magowan, Giants president and managing general partner.

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Peter McGowan, left, with PG&E CEO Tom King.

“Through this partnership, we hope to raise awareness about the importance of using energy wisely and efficiently and about the need to develop and utilize renewable energy sources.”

The AT&T Park solar installation consists of 590 Sharp solar panels in three areas of AT&T Park– on the Port Walk along McCovey Cove, on the newly erected canopy over the Willie Mays pedestrian ramp, and on the roof of the Giants Building.

Once connected to the grid prior to Major League Baseball’s All-Star Week festivities, the clean energy from these solar panels will flow directly to PG&E’s customers throughout northern and central California.

In addition to bringing PG&E’s customers more clean energy, the visibility and the location of the ballpark also serve as a way to raise awareness of the value of renewable power – especially in the fight against climate change.

PG&E is also looking in our home city of San Francisco and throughout our service area for other locations that will showcase the benefits of solar power.

“Reducing our dependence on fossil fuels and protecting our environment requires bold leadership and vision,” said Newsom.

“We applaud the Giants and PG&E for their commitment to solar energy and for their long-term focus on helping to make San Francisco the greenest city in the nation.”

“The completion of the AT&T Park solar installation reflects our shared vision with the Giants to make San Francisco the greenest city in the nation,” said Tom King, CEO of Pacific Gas and Electric Company.

“PG&E is committed to exploring innovative solutions, like solar, wave and tidal power, to increase the amount of renewable energy that we bring the City and County of San Francisco and all of the communities we serve.”

Since its inception, the Giants have made energy conservation a priority in AT&T Park’s design and daily operations.

The park was designed to be an energy efficient facility — utilizing fluorescent lighting, motion sensor lighting and energy management systems. The Giants and PG&E are also working together to identify additional ways to create energy-saving opportunities.

For example, the new Diamond Vision scoreboard will use 78% less energy than the ballpark’s original scoreboard. Additionally, PG&E and the Giants have launched a five-year public awareness campaign to educate and encourage Giants fans to use energy responsibly.

The completion of the solar installation at AT&T Park is the latest example of PG&E’s role in bringing solar power to San Francisco. PG&E has committed to spending more than $7.5 million on solar installations throughout the city, including its own service center.

In addition, PG&E is making charitable contributions of another $2.5 million to help non-profit organizations and schools in San Francisco install solar power. In January, the company helped the San Francisco LGBT Center install a 96 panel solar system and the company recently installed a solar panel at San Francisco’s A.P. Giannini Middle School.

PG&E has interconnected more than 15,000 customer-owned solar-generating systems to the power grid – representing more than 110 megawatts and more than any other utility in the nation. In San Francisco, PG&E has helped interconnect almost 600 of these solar systems. For more information on PG&E’s environmental efforts, please visit www.pge.com/environment.

Visit www.letsgreenthiscity.com and www.pge.com.

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PAT MURPHY
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
In his youth, Pat Murphy worked as a General Assignment reporter for the Richmond Independent, the Berkeley Daily Gazette, and the San Francisco Chronicle. He served as Managing Editor of the St. Albans (Vermont) Daily Messenger at age 21. Murphy also launched ValPak couponing in San Francisco, as the company’s first San Francisco franchise owner. He walked the bricks, developing ad strategy for a broad range of restaurants and merchants. Pat knows what works and what doesn’t work. His writing skill has been employed by marketing agencies, including Don Solem & Associates. He has covered San Francisco governance for the past ten years. Pat scribes an offbeat view of the human family through Believe It or What.

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BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Bill Wilson is a veteran freelance photographer whose work is published by San Francisco and East Bay media. Bill embraced photography at the age of eight. In recent years, his photos capture historic record of the San Francisco LGBT community in the Bay Area Reporter (BAR). Bill has contributed to the Sentinel for the past three years.

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HIROSHI SUGIMOTO – Retrospective of photographer’s work at the de Young Museum, July 7th – September 23rd

Exhibit at Herbst Exhibition Galleries includes major works from 1976 to the present.

By Seán Martinfield

San Francisco, June 29th, 2007 — The extraordinary 30-year career of photographer Hiroshi Sugimoto (b. 1948, Japan) is celebrated in this collection of 120 luminous photographs, made from 1976 to the present. This presentation constitutes the first major survey of Sugimoto’s oeuvre and includes such iconic works as Chrysler Building, 1997, and Ligurian Sea, Frumura, 1993.

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CHRYSLER BUILDING, 1997 and LIGURIAN SEA, FRUMURA, 1993 – Hiroshi Sugimoto. Courtesy of the artist.

One of Japan’s most important contemporary artists, Sugimoto is known for his ongoing, multiple series of hauntingly beautiful black-and-white photographs, which explore the themes of time, memory, dreams, and natural histories. Working with a large-format camera, his glowing images range from the starkly minimal to the richly detailed, and are often suffused with expanses of light and space.

HIROSHI SUGIMOTO is co-organized by the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C., and the Mori Art Museum, Tokyo. The exhibition includes examples of the series that Sugimoto began in the mid-1970s, “Dioramas and Movie Theaters”, which are views of natural history displays and the screens and architecture of cinemas, as well as images from “Seascapes and Portraits”, started in the 1980s and 1990s, respectively. The seven photographs in “Portraits” include images that were taken at Madame Tussaud’s Wax Museum in London of wax models of Henry VIII and his six wives. Sugimoto painstakingly “remade” them to look like the original paintings from which they were modeled by isolating them from their surroundings in the wax gallery and employing lighting techniques similar to those that the painters might have used. Another photograph, The Music Lesson (1999) further elaborates on the connection between painting and photography. It depicts a wax re-creation of Johannes Vermeer’s painting The Virginal with a Gentleman (The Music Lesson), 1662–1664, which was thought to have been created with the aid of a camera obscura.

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HENRY VIII and ANNE BOLEYN, 1999 – Hiroshi Sugimoto. Courtesy of the artist.

Nine works from Sugimoto’s more recent Architecture series are also featured. These blurred, almost dream-like images conjure the moment when an architect’s inspiration begins to coalesce into a vision. In a special tribute to the architects of the new de Young Museum, Sugimoto has included for the San Francisco showing Signal Box–Herzog & de Meuron (1998), a photograph of the copper-clad building in Basel, Switzerland that was a model for the de Young.

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THE MUSIC LESSONS – Vermeer (left) and Sugimoto (right)

The show also presents Sea of Buddha, 1995 which is comprised of 48 photographs of 1001 Buddhist sculptures, taken in the 12th-century Sanjusangen-do temple in Kyoto. These images were made under conditions that recreated the splendor of the original Heian period installation, but the serial repetition of the sculptures reminded Sugimoto of certain qualities of 20th-century art, and his photographs link them to aesthetic techniques of 1970s minimalism. Like Sea of Buddha, the series Conceptual Forms, which was begun in 2004, encapsulates the artist’s interest in tangible models as points of entry into spiritual theoretical concepts. The eight photographs in the Conceptual Forms series, Mechanical Forms, 2004 and the three-dimensional piece La Boile en Valise (The Wooden Box), 2004, also pay homage to the influence of Marcel Duchamp on Sugimoto. “Art resides even in things with no artistic intentions,” he has said of these works.

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HIROSHI SUGIMOTO. Courtesy of the artist.

Hiroshi Sugimoto has designed each of the four museum installations in the tour of his retrospective. His experiences working with the architectural challenges of curved walls at the signature Bunshaft-designed Hirshhorn Museum inspired his decision to create a curved wall for the installation of ten Seacapes photographs at the de Young Museum. They will be shown in a dramatic space lit by special frame projectors that create window-like vistas onto a seemingly endless sea.

The exhibition is accompanied by a catalogue titled HIROSHI SUGIMOTO. Published by the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. and the Mori Art Museum, Tokyo, in association with Hatje Cantz Publishers. Black-and- white and color illustrations, 338 pages; hardcover $96; paperbound, $35.
To purchase, click here: Museum Stores.

For more information on the de Young and HIROSHI SUGIMOTO: EXHIBITIONS

See Seán’s recent articles:
NORMA SHEARER – Headlines the 12th ANNUAL SILENT FILM FESTIVAL
NAN KEMPNER –de Young Museum Presents Couture Collection
IPHIGÉNIE EN TAURIDE –Everything old is new again at SF Opera
JERSEY BOYS – Earth Angels invade Curran Theatre! Cast #2: Their Eyes Adore You!
SPIDER-MAN 3, An All-American Cinematic Marvel
SAMSON vs DELILAH at AT&T Park – Can Stadium Survive Biblical Shearing?
$55 MILLION – This Pacific Heights Mansion Is YOURS!
LA VIE EN ROSE (La Môme) – Biography of Edith Piaf – A Sensation at the 50th San Francisco International Film Festival
An Interview with PASCAL MOLAT – Principal Soloist, San Francisco Ballet

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San Francisco Sentinel’s Fine Arts Critic Seán Martinfield is a native San Franciscan. He is a Theatre Arts Graduate from San Francisco State University, a professional singer, and well-known private vocal coach to Bay Area actors and singers of all ages and persuasions. His clients have appeared in Broadway National Tours including Wicked, Aïda, Miss Saigon, Rent, Bye Bye Birdie, in theatres and cabarets throughout the Bay Area, and are regularly featured in major City events including Diva Fest, Gay Pride, and Halloween In The Castro. As an Internet consultant in vocal development and audition preparation he has published thousands of responses to those seeking his advice concerning singing techniques, professional and academic auditions, and careers in the Performing Arts. Ask him a question on AllExperts.com . If you would like to build up your vocal performance chops and participate in the Bay Area’s rich theatrical scene, e-mail him at: seanmartinfield@att.net.

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