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STREET VIOLENCE: Three more shot

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San Francisco police are searching for suspects in connection with a Friday night shooting that injured three people, according to a San Francisco police officer.

The shooting took place at around 10:10 p.m. at Keith Street and Oakdale Avenue. All victims suffered non-life threatening injuries, according to the officer.

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July 28 Videos of The Day – BELLYFLOPS OF THE CARIBBEAN – SOMEWHERE OVER YOUR RAINBOW, MAYBE – MORE TEMPESTS, PLEASE – Photos of The Day – SAN FRANCISCO HAS A BUDGET AND NANI COLORETTI GETS THE PEN – Babies born today will be petulant little suckers – Live radar and weather forecast

July 28 Videos of The Day
BELLYFLOPS OF THE CARIBBEAN

July 27 Photos of The Day

SOMEWHERE OVER YOUR RAINBOW, MAYBE

MORE TEMPESTS, PLEASE

July 28 Photos of The Day
SAN FRANCISCO HAS A BUDGET
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Nani Coloretti displays $6.77 billion San Francisco budget completed during her first year in the Budget Director’s Office signed into law Friday by Mayor Gavin Newsom.
PHOTO BY BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

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Streets

This year’s budget for the first time meets the city’s repaving needs. It includes $5.4 million more for street repaving over last year, for a total of $36.4 million.

Public Safety

The “Back to Basics” budget emphasizes public safety by adding 250 new police officers, augmenting the 354 new officers added since 2004. Newsom also added 12 new park patrol officers for Golden Gate Park.

Homelessness

Newsom’s budget doubles the number of Homeless Outreach Team members and invests $500,000 to create a Community Justice Center, one of Newsom’s signature initiatives. The center will address street crime and provide rehabilitative services.

Muni

The Board has approved Newsom’s Muni budget, which fills 135 Muni operator positions and adds 18 street managers. The Muni fleet will be improved with 86 new hybrid buses, and a $2.5 million upgrade will be made to the light rail vehicle fleet. Newsom’s budget also invests $10 million in customer service improvements.

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JULY 28 BIRTHDAY LORE
You have a keen, alert, and active mind. You are energetic and, when working under any strain, you are nervous and somewhat petulant, although charming and happy when your mind is free. You enjoy culture and refinement, love children, and will be happy in your own home.

ADVICE FOR JULY 28
Dream of a pen and you will be gifted with knowledge.

JULY 28 WORD OF THE DAY
Golden number. Defintion: A number in the 19-year cycle of the Moon, used for determining the date of Easter. (The Moon repeats its phases approximately every 19 years.) Add 1 to any given year and divide the result by 19; the remainder is the Golden Number. If there is no remainder, the Golden Number is 19.

JULY 28 IN HISTORY
Born: Beatrix Potter (author), 1866. Southern Mississippi was hit by the Bay St. Louis Hurricane, in which the U.S. ship Cutter sank and 39 crew members died, 1819.

REALTIME SAN FRANCISCO WEATHER
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Saturday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, cloudy, then gradually becoming partly sunny, with a high near 69. West southwest wind between 9 and 13 mph.

Saturday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, increasing clouds, with a low around 57. West southwest wind between 8 and 13 mph.

Sunday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, cloudy, then gradually becoming partly sunny, with a high near 70. West southwest wind between 8 and 13 mph.

Sunday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 56. West southwest wind between 8 and 13 mph.

Monday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a high near 69.

Monday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 56.

Tuesday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a high near 69.

Tuesday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 57.

Wednesday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 69.

Wednesday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 57.

Thursday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 70.

Thursday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 57.

Friday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a high near 70.

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BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Bill Wilson is a veteran freelance photographer whose work is published by San Francisco and East Bay media. Bill embraced photography at the age of eight. In recent years, his photos capture historic record of the San Francisco LGBT community in the Bay Area Reporter (BAR). Bill has contributed to the Sentinel for the past three years.

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PESKIN DRAWS NEWSOM IRE OVER MUNI REFORM SLEIGHT OF HAND

BY PAT MURPHY
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

A stern Mayor Newsom today emphasized by finger jab his consternation with a neon-like — first it was there, then it wasn’t, now it is — provision having reappeared over night in a Muni reform Charter Amendment proposal.

“That will change,” Newsom told the Sentinel.

In part, that provision displaces needed funding to build neighborhood garages backed by neighborhood small business leaders and the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce. And supercedes a November ballot initiative which would permit more downtown parking spaces.

Aaron Peskin, president of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, authored the Charter Amendment ballot proposal and Monday led a joint press conference with labor leaders and Newsom announcing unified support.

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Supervisor Aaron Peskin, left, leads Monday announcement of labor support with San Francisco Labor Council Executive Director Tim Paulson, center, and San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom.
PHOTOS BY BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

Peskin legislative aide David Noyola released the entire measure to the Sentinel 30 minutes prior to the press conference — demanding it back, as the press conference began, before he would release a revised version to the Sentinel.

Earlier version contained the provision opposed by business leaders which had been deleted in the second version at mayoral insistence.

That was the version the mayor signed on to in Monday’s unanimity convocation.

Overnight the provision again located itself in authorizing legislation presented to the Board of Supervisors to vote yea or nay ballot presentation to San Francisco voters in the November election.

A startled Supervisor Michela Alioto-Pier queried Peskin whether the Newsom Administration knew of the change.

“I am just curious, if they knew then why wasn’t it there when the press conference was held and when this document was disseminated?” lilted Alioto-Pier.

Peskin implied Newsom preferred the Board to take anticipated heat from the business community.

“I believe it was the desire of the chief executive of San Francisco (Newsom) that that be not included yesterday and that it would be up to this board to consider today and indeed that question is now before this body.”

The mayor is opposed to the provision, Colleen Crowley told the Board, who serves as mayoral liaison to the body.

Her comment frankly surpised Peskin, he said.

Indeed, Peskin told the Sentinel following Board adjournment, Peskin drew his conclusion from a face-to-face meeting with Newom of Mayoral Chief of Staff Phil Ginsburg.

“Well, it is my belief that the mayor wants to support Muni reform and you’d have to ask him his position on that particular provision which I consider to be part and parcel of Muni reform,” Peskin stated to the Sentinel.

“But that they preferred not be included in the draft that was presented in the joint press conference yesterday,” Peskin continued.

“Well, that’s certainly what I thought they said but apparently that’s not what they thought they said — you know, the mayor and his chief of staff.”

That conversation occured, “I don’t know. Sometime yesterday,” Peskin said Tuesday.

Newsom this afternoon released the following statement.

“I worked in good faith with Supervisor Aaron Peskin, Nat Ford, and the unions to draft a charter amendment that included important reforms to improve Muni.

“On Monday, I announced my support for this charter amendment.

“Yesterday, Supervisor Peskin introduced a different version than the one I had supported. He added a provision about parking that I disagree with — one that has nothing to do with the Muni reform we sought.

“The parking provision was added to the charter amendment to coincide with a parking measure that is on the ballot at the same time. It confuses two separate issue.

“Supervisor Peskin deserves credit for showing leadership and bringing together disparate parties to craft this charter amendment.

“But Muni reform is too important to be drawn into a separate political battle.

“I will actively support the charter amendment only if the parking provision is removed.”

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PAT MURPHY
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
In his youth, Pat Murphy worked as a General Assignment reporter for the Richmond Independent, the Berkeley Daily Gazette, and the San Francisco Chronicle. He served as Managing Editor of the St. Albans (Vermont) Daily Messenger at age 21. Murphy also launched ValPak couponing in San Francisco, as the company’s first San Francisco franchise owner. He walked the bricks, developing ad strategy for a broad range of restaurants and merchants. Pat knows what works and what doesn’t work. His writing skill has been employed by marketing agencies, including Don Solem & Associates. He has covered San Francisco governance for the past ten years. Pat scribes an offbeat view of the human family through Believe It or What.

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BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Bill Wilson is a veteran freelance photographer whose work is published by San Francisco and East Bay media. Bill embraced photography at the age of eight. In recent years, his photos capture historic record of the San Francisco LGBT community in the Bay Area Reporter (BAR). Bill has contributed to the Sentinel for the past three years.

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LANCET STUDY indicates marijuana may increase chance of psychosis

Using marijuana seems to increase the chance of becoming psychotic, researchers report in an analysis of past research that reignites the issue of whether pot is dangerous.

The new review suggests that even infrequent use could raise the small but real risk of this serious mental illness by 40 percent.

Doctors have long suspected a connection and say the latest findings underline the need to highlight marijuana’s long-term risks. The research, paid for by the British Health Department, is being published Friday in medical journal The Lancet.

“The available evidence now suggests that cannabis is not as harmless as many people think,” said Dr. Stanley Zammit, one of the study’s authors and a lecturer in the department of psychological medicine at Cardiff University.

The researchers said they couldn’t prove that marijuana use itself increases the risk of psychosis, a category of several disorders with schizophrenia being the most commonly known.

There could be something else about marijuana users, “like their tendency to use other drugs or certain personality traits, that could be causing the psychoses,” Zammit said.

Marijuana is the most frequently used illegal substance in many countries, including the United Kingdom and the United States. About 20 percent of young adults report using it at least once a week, according to government statistics.

Zammit and colleagues from the University of Bristol, Imperial College and Cambridge University examined 35 studies that tracked tens of thousands of people for periods ranging from one year to 27 years to examine the effect of marijuana on mental health.

They looked for psychotic illnesses as well as cognitive disorders including delusions and hallucinations, bipolar disorder, depression, anxiety, neuroses and suicidal tendencies.

They found that people who used marijuana had roughly a 40 percent higher chance of developing a psychotic disorder later in life. The overall risk remains very low.

For example, Zammit said the risk of developing schizophrenia for most people is less than 1 percent. The prevalence of schizophrenia is believed to be about five in 1,000 people. But because of the drug’s wide popularity, the researchers estimate that about 800 new cases of psychosis could be prevented by reducing marijuana use.

The scientists found a more disturbing outlook for “heavy users” of pot, those who used it daily or weekly: Their risk for psychosis jumped to a range of 50 percent to 200 percent.

One doctor noted that people with a history of mental illness in their families could be at higher risk. For them, marijuana use “could unmask the underlying schizophrenia,” said Dr. Deepak Cyril D’Souza, an associate professor of psychiatry at Yale University, who was not involved in the study.

Dr. Wilson Compton, a senior scientist at the National Institute on Drug Abuse in Washington, called the study persuasive.

“The strongest case is that there are consistencies across all of the studies,” and that the link was seen only with psychoses — not anxiety, depression or other mental health problems, he said.

Scientists cannot rule out that pre-existing conditions could have led to both marijuana use and later psychoses, he added.

Scientists think it is biologically possible that marijuana could cause psychoses because it interrupts important neurotransmitters such as dopamine. That can interfere with the brain’s communication systems.

Some experts say governments should now work to dispel the misconception that marijuana is a benign drug.

“We’ve reached the end of the road with these kinds of studies,” said Dr. Robin Murray of King’s College, who had no role in the Lancet study. “Experts are now agreed on the connection between cannabis and psychoses. What we need now is for 14-year-olds to know it.”

In the U.K., the government will soon reconsider how marijuana should be classified in its hierarchy of drugs. In 2004, it was downgraded and penalties for possession were reduced. Many expect marijuana will be bumped up to a class “B” category, with offenses likely to lead to arrests or longer jail sentences.

Two of the authors of the study were invited experts on the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs Cannabis Review in 2005. Several authors reported being paid to attend drug company-sponsored meetings related to marijuana, and one received consulting fees from companies that make antipsychotic medications.

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SUNSET RESIDENTS testify they believe Supervisor Ed Jew did not live in neighborhood

Sunset District residents testified today at the opening of a preliminary hearing for embattled San Francisco Supervisor Ed Jew that they did not believe Jew had been living in the neighborhood.

Jew has pleaded not guilty to nine felony charges related to alleged violations of the city elections code. Prosecutors question whether he lives inside the district he represents and whether he misrepresented his residence in candidate nominating documents.

Jew has reportedly has been present at his Sunset District home, located at 2450 28th Ave., intermittently since around 1984.

The District 4 supervisor appeared in San Francisco Superior Court this morning, smiling and greeting onlookers in the courtroom.

Two residents — one a male next-door neighbor and the other a woman who lives four doors down — were questioned by Assistant District Attorney Evan Ackiron. They testified that they barely ever saw Jew at the home, the lights were hardly ever seen going on and off, and garbage cans were never placed outside the home during pickup days.

A Pacific Gas and Electric Co. employee later testified to sparse electrical and gas usage at the residence for several months in 2006.

Jew’s attorney Bill Fazio said he believes there is sufficient proof that he satisfied residency requirements prior to running for public office in the November 2006 election.

“The prosecution is barking up the wrong tree in prosecuting Mr. Jew,” Fazio said outside the courtroom today. Fazio argued that the neighbors’ recall may be inaccurate.

Jew has a house in Burlingame, Fazio said, “but his home is in San Francisco.”

However, San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera has pointed to evidence suggesting Jew did not fulfill residency requirements to run for city office.

This afternoon, Jew’s next-door neighbor in Burlingame Joan Giampaoli testified that for several years she saw Jew leave like clockwork early each morning from his Burlingame home. Even after Jew had been elected in San Francisco, she continued to see him leave from the Burlingame home.

“I thought he was going to move (to San Francisco) because of the election,” Giampaoli said. The behavior continued up until news broke in May of an FBI raid at Jew’s San Francisco residence, she said.

Jew is the subject of a separate FBI probe into his alleged acceptance of $40,000 in cash from a group of businessmen having permit problems. Jew denies wrongdoing and no federal charges have been filed.

The preliminary hearing is expected to last another three days, continuing Monday at 10 a.m. At its conclusion, Superior Court Judge Harold Kahn will rule on whether there is enough evidence for Jew to stand trial.

Bay City News

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STREET VIOLENCE: Bullet riddled body noticed

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Officers are searching for suspects after a man in his 30s was pronounced dead this morning, a San Francisco police dispatcher said.

Police responded to reports of shots fired on the unit block of 12th Street just after midnight, a dispatcher said. The victim was found to be suffering multiple gunshot wounds.

There is no further information at this time, a dispatcher said.

Bay City News

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THE BIG VOICE: God or Merman?

Direct From Off-Broadway – A Special Event at the New Conservatory Theatre Center

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By Seán Martinfield
Sentinel Fine Arts Critic
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

New Conservatory Theatre Center is proud to announce the exclusive limited-engagement of the Off-Broadway hit THE BIG VOICE: God Or Merman? – starring the original cast, Steve Schalchlin and Jim Brochu. The show previews August 1st – 3rd; opens August 4th and runs through August 19th. Performances are Wednesdays through Saturdays at 8:00 pm and Sundays at 2:00 pm. All performances will take place at the New Conservatory Theatre Center’s DECKER THEATRE, located at 25 Van Ness Avenue near Market, in San Francisco. Tickets are $25-$30 ($15 for previews and $35 for opening night). Tickets are available at NCTC’s Box Office 415-861-8972, or online at THE BIG VOICE.

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THE BIG VOICE – Jim Brochu and Steve Schalchlin. Photo by Ed Krieger

Direct from Off-Broadway, Steve Schalchlin and Jim Brochu join NCTC for this exclusive Pride Season 13 production where they musicalize their relationship and hilariously prove that showbiz is as much a calling as the priesthood. This high energy, razzle-dazzle show chronicles the lives of a Baptist from Arkansas and a Catholic from Brooklyn who find eternal salvation in the temple of musical theatre. The show traces the couple’s meeting aboard a ship in the Atlantic Ocean, Steve’s struggle with AIDS, the production of their hit off-Broadway musical, The Last Session, their separation and their reconciliation.

Partners for over twenty years, Jim Brochu and Steve Schalchlin received numerous awards for their off-Broadway hits, The Last Session and THE BIG VOICE: God Or Merman?

In 1994-95, Steve Schalchlin, a composer/lyricist, and singer/pianist was in bed and barely mobile due to AIDS-related illness. Long before “Google” was a verb, Schalchlin began to use the Internet to research and share information with others who were living with the disease. The pooling of collective experiences led to greater knowledge of HIV/AIDS and before long, Schalchlin started one of the first web blogs detailing the course of his disease.

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STEVE SCHALCHLIN, Composer and Lyricist

But then he didn’t die. Four months later, new medications were discovered and Schalchlin, who was “weeks away from dying” was saved by the AIDS cocktail. Schalchlin’s blog is still active and appropriately named THE BONUS ROUND. His lyrics featured in the songs of The Last Session and THE BIG VOICE are so brutally honest about his journey from evangelical Southern Baptist boy to closeted gay to near-death from HIV, to success on the musical stage, that his audiences share the emotional roller coaster in indelibly personal ways. THE BIG VOICE won Best Score in 2003 from the L.A. Drama Critics Circle and the Oscar Wilde Award in 2004.

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STEVE SCHALCHLIN – Looking Cool

A native of Brooklyn, Jim Brochu has had a thirty-year show business career as an actor, writer, director and producer. In 2003, Jim Picked up two Theatre L.A. Ovation Award Nominations for The Big Voice: God or Merman?: Best Actor in a Musical, and Best Musical. Jim currently lives in Los Angeles where, between theatrical assignments, he travels all over the world lecturing about Broadway, Hollywood and the legendary stars with whom he has worked. He is an active member of the Dramatists Guild, Actors Equity Association, the Society of Stage Directors and Choreographers and remains, as the New York Times called him, a true “Man of the Theatre.” In 2000, Brochu and Schalchlin were presented a plaque from Mayor Richard Riordan on behalf of the City of Los Angeles for their contribution to the Arts and for improving the quality of life in the city.

To purchase tickets on-line: THE BIG VOICE

For your dining pleasure, Seán recommends:
FLIPPER’S – Wrap your lips around a great burger at 482 Hayes Street (Between Gough Street and Octavia). Phone: 415-552-8880.

CANTO DO BRAZIL – From Friday to Sunday, try the Feijoada Completa – a Brazilian-style cassoulet – with black beans, smoked ham, beef, sausage, and spices that will make you “Sing OUT, Louise!!!”
41 Franklin Street (between Page and Oak). Reservations recommended. 415-626-8727.

For a taste of Ethel Merman, Seán recommends this CD:
THE ETHEL MERMAN COLLECTION
Songs include: If I Knew You Were Comin’ I’d A Baked A Cake; You Can’t Get A Man With A Gun; and Make It An Old Fashion, Please!

See Seán’s recent articles:
INSIGNIFICANT OTHERS – A Conversation with Composer Jay Kuo
HOTEL CASABLANCA – World Premiere in San Francisco
NEIL SEDAKA and PATTI LuPONE – This Week In San Francisco
NORMA SHEARER Flick Opens the San Francisco Silent Film Festival
JERSEY BOYS – Earth Angels invade Curran Theatre! Cast #2: Their Eyes Adore You!
IPHIGÉNIE EN TAURIDE – Everything old is new again at SF Opera
JEANETTE MacDONALD – First Lady of “San Francisco”
DER ROSENKAVALIER – A Viennese Bon-Bon At San Francisco Opera
An Interview with PASCAL MOLAT, Principal Dancer of the San Francisco Ballet
DAVID GOCKLEY’S “DON GIOVANNI” – Semper Fi!
SAMSON vs DELILAH at AT&T Park – Can Stadium Survive Biblical Shearing?

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San Francisco Sentinel’s Fine Arts Critic Seán Martinfield is a native San Franciscan. He is a Theatre Arts Graduate from San Francisco State University, a professional singer, and well-known private vocal coach to Bay Area actors and singers of all ages and persuasions. His clients have appeared in Broadway National Tours including Wicked, Aïda, Miss Saigon, Rent, Bye Bye Birdie, in theatres and cabarets throughout the Bay Area, and are regularly featured in major City events including Diva Fest, Gay Pride, and Halloween In The Castro. As an Internet consultant in vocal development and audition preparation he has published thousands of responses to those seeking his advice concerning singing techniques, professional and academic auditions, and careers in the Performing Arts. Ask him a question on AllExperts.com . If you would like to build up your vocal performance chops and participate in the Bay Area’s rich theatrical scene, e-mail him at: seanmartinfield@att.net.

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CALIFORNIA SUPREME COURT rules against car forfeiture

BY JULIA CHEEVER

The California Supreme Court ruled by a narrow 4-3 vote in San Francisco today that cities can’t pass local laws providing for the forfeiture of cars used for drug dealing and prostitution.

The court majority said such laws are pre-empted by state law.

The ruling overturns a Stockton law and in effect also tosses out similar laws in 28 other cities including Oakland, Richmond and Los Angeles, according to Mark Clausen, a lawyer for a citizen who challenged the Stockton law.

Stockton City Attorney Ren Nosky said, “We’re very disappointed. It was an effective crime deterrent for us.”

But American Civil Liberties Union attorney Alan Schlosser said, “We think it’s a very good decision. These laws impose what is in practical terms a severe penalty by seizing a person’s car for up to a year without giving fundamental due process.”

The 2001 Stockton measure allowed authorities to seize a vehicle used to solicit prostitution or buy drugs, including even in misdemeanor transactions such as buying one ounce of marijuana. Police could keep the car for up to a year before filing a court petition for forfeiture.

The high court majority said such measures conflict with state statutes that restrict vehicle forfeiture to the most serious drug cases and allow removal but not forfeiture of cars in some prostitution cases.

Justice Joyce Kennard wrote that prostitution and drug dealing “are matters of statewide concern that our Legislature has comprehensively addressed through various provisions of this state’s penal and vehicle codes, leaving no room for further regulation at the local level.”

The majority said state law differs from Stockton’s measure both by restricting forfeitures to fewer drug cases and by imposing a stricter standard of proof – proof beyond a reasonable doubt compared with a preponderance of evidence – before a car can be confiscated.

Kennard wrote in a footnote that the Legislature is free to pass a new law authorizing local governments to pass their own forfeiture measures.

Justice Carol Corrigan said in the dissent that the Stockton law is “a practical and responsible attempt by the city of Stockton to address problems it and many other cities face on a daily basis.”

Corrigan, joined by Justices Marvin Baxter and Ming Chin, wrote, “Street commerce in drugs and sex forces innocent people to share their neighborhoods with pimps, prostitutes and drug dealers who use their streets as a bazaar for illegal transactions.”

Corrigan concluded, “It should not be the case that local governments require the permission of the state to protect their own citizens from nuisances that profoundly affect their quality of life and the quiet enjoyment of their own property.”

The office of Oakland City Attorney John Russo issued a statement saying, “As a result of the Supreme Court decision, we will work with the City Council to revise the ordinance accordingly.”

Oakland’s law, passed in 1997, was the first in the state to be enacted.

A number of other cities followed suit after a state appeals court in San Francisco upheld the measure in 2000 and the state Supreme Court refused to hear a further appeal by two citizens represented by the ACLU later that year.

But in today’s ruling, the state high court took the legal step of officially disapproving of the appeals court decision in the Oakland case.

In the Stockton case, the ACLU submitted a friend-of-the-court brief urging the court to overturn the law, saying, “Motor vehicles are a necessity of life in California.”

On the other side, the League of California Cities filed a brief asking the court to uphold the local laws.

Senior Deputy Los Angeles City Attorney Claudia McGee, who wrote the brief, said today, “It was a close decision. The court clearly did leave open the option of asking the state Legislature to clarify its intent.”

Bay City News

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July 27 Videos of The Day – GO AND SIN NO LITTLE – A CUP TOO MANY – FEBRUARY EVERY DAY – July 27 Photo of the Day – NEWSOM STAFFER MIGUEL BUSTOS LEAVES FOR RON DELLUMS ADMINISTRATION – FERRY BUILDING PARTY FOR HERB CAEN MORE MEMORABLE THAN ANY UN HEAD HONCHO – Babies born today will be vivacious – Live radar and weather forecast

July 27 Videos of The Day
GO AND SIN NO LITTLE

A CUP TOO MANY

FEBRUARY EVERY DAY

July 27 Photos of The Day
NEWSOM STAFFER MIGUEL BUSTOS LEAVES FOR RON DELLUMS ADMINISTRATION
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Miguel Bustos, right, welcomes UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon to San Francisco Thursday. Bustos, native San Franciscan and former legislative aide to Congresswoman Barbara Lee, finishes his last day today as senior staffer to San Francisco Mayor Newsom, headed for his new position as director of Inter-Governmental Affairs for Oakland Mayor Ron Dellums.
PHOTO BY BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

SENTINEL SAYS HI TOO
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FERRY BUILDING PARTY FOR HERB CAEN MORE MEMORABLE THAN ANY UN HEAD HONCHO
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JULY 27 BIRTHDAY LORE
You concentrate your earnest efforts on all your undertakings and, with your ambitions and determination, you are capable of great success and happiness. You are vivacious and lovable, and your friends are true and loyal to you. You love with your whole heart and need a sincere and constant love in return.

ADVICE FOR JULY 27
When silk flowers get dusty, put them in a paper bag with several tablespoons of salt and shake gently for two minutes to clean them.

JULY 27 WORD OF THE DAY
Precession. Defintion: The slowly changing position of the stars and equinoxes in the sky resulting from variations in the orientation of Earth’s axis.

JULY 26 IN HISTORY
Died: Bob Hope (comedian & actor), 2003. Severe thunderstorms in Yuma, Arizona, created zero visibility due to dust blowing in the 90 mph winds, 1989.

REALTIME SAN FRANCISCO WEATHER
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Friday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, cloudy through mid morning, then gradual clearing, with a high near 71. West southwest wind between 7 and 13 mph.

Friday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, increasing clouds, with a low around 56. West southwest wind between 8 and 13 mph.

Saturday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, cloudy through mid morning, then gradual clearing, with a high near 70. West southwest wind between 8 and 15 mph.

Saturday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 56. West wind between 8 and 15 mph, with gusts as high as 18 mph.

Sunday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 70.

Sunday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 55.

Monday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 69.

Monday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 55.

Tuesday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 68.

Tuesday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 57.

Wednesday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 68.

Wednesday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 57.

Thursday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 69.

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BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Bill Wilson is a veteran freelance photographer whose work is published by San Francisco and East Bay media. Bill embraced photography at the age of eight. In recent years, his photos capture historic record of the San Francisco LGBT community in the Bay Area Reporter (BAR). Bill has contributed to the Sentinel for the past three years.

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STREET VIOLENCE: San Francisco global leader in drop-off homicide service

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The victim of a fatal San Francisco shooting was allegedly dropped off at Ingleside Police Station this afternoon, an officer said.

Police believe that the victim received a shotgun wound to the head at 23rd Street and South Van Ness before being dropped off at the police station.

The victim was dropped off at around 3 p.m., police said.

Homicide investigators and the San Francisco medical examiner are investigating the incident.

Bay City News

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STREET VIOLENCE: Assailant strikes San Francisco police officer with truck – High speed chase naps suspect in Oakland

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The driver of a white pickup truck who struck a San Francisco police officer and led police on a high-speed chase across the Bay Bridge was taken into custody in Oakland, San Francisco police Sgt. Steve Mannina said this morning.

The incident began today at 1:30 a.m. when a San Francisco police officer was directing traffic at Harrison and Essex streets, Mannina said.

The suspect was driving a white pickup truck, possibly a Ford F150, eastbound in the westbound lanes of Harrison Street.

The officer attempted to wave the truck down and stop it, but the suspect did not decrease his speed and continued to drive toward the officer.

The officer fired at the truck just before the suspect struck him, Mannina said. The officer was taken to San Francisco General Hospital with non life-threatening injuries.

After the suspect struck the officer he merged onto eastbound Interstate Highway 80. An off-duty San Francisco police officer witnessed the incident and pursued the suspect across the Bay Bridge into Alameda County, Mannina said.

The off-duty officer coordinated with other police officers and the suspect was stopped and arrested on Interstate Highway 880 at the Broadway exit in Oakland, Mannina said. The chase ended about 15 minutes after it began in San Francisco.

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PG&E SOLAR POWER expands to 400,000 additional Northern California homes

Pacific Gas and Electric Company announced Wednesdayday that it has entered into a landmark renewable energy agreement with Solel-MSP-1 to purchase renewable energy from the Mojave Solar Park, to be constructed in California’s Mojave Desert.

The project will deliver 553 megawatts of solar power, the equivalent of powering 400,000 homes, to PG&E’s customers in northern and central California. The Mojave Solar Park project is now the world’s largest single solar commitment.

“The solar thermal project announced today is another major milestone in realizing our goal to supply 20 percent of our customers’ energy needs with clean renewable energy,” said Fong Wan, vice president of Energy Procurement, PG&E.

“Through the agreement with Solel, we can harness the sun’s climate-friendly power to provide our customers with reliable and cost-effective energy on an unprecedented scale.”

The plant utilizes Solel’s patented and commercially-proven solar thermal parabolic trough technology. Over the past 20 years, the technology has powered nine operating solar power plants in the Mojave Desert and is currently generating 354 MW of annual electricity.

When fully operational in 2011, the Mojave Solar Park plant will cover up to 6,000 acres, or nine square miles in the Mojave Desert. Solel is working closely with URS Corporation in the development of the Mojave Solar Park, which when commercial will rely on 1.2 million mirrors and 317 miles of vacuum tubing to capture the desert sun’s heat.

“We are thrilled to bring 553 MW of clean energy to California,” said Avi Brenmiller, chief executive officer of Solel Solar Systems. “Our proven solar technology means Solel can economically turn the energy of the warm California sun into clean power for the state’s homes and businesses.”

Solel Solar Systems of Israel, the world’s largest solar thermal company, is the parent company of Solel-MSP-1 LLC. Solel’s leading technology utilizes parabolic mirrors to concentrate solar energy onto its patented UVAC 2008 solar thermal receivers.

The receivers contain a fluid that is heated and circulated, and the heat is released to generate steam. The steam powers a turbine to produce electricity, which can be delivered to a utility’s electric grid. The electricity generated by Mojave Solar Park will use some of the transmission infrastructure originally built for the now dormant coal-fired Mojave Generation Station to deliver the power to PG&E’s customers.

The agreement filed yesterday with the California Public Utilities Commission is part of PG&E’s broader renewable energy portfolio.

PG&E currently supplies 12 percent of its energy from qualifying renewable sources under California’s Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) program. With more than 50 percent of the energy PG&E delivers to its customers coming from generating sources that emit no carbon dioxide, PG&E provides among the cleanest energy in the nation.

PG&E is aggressively adding renewable electric power resources to its supply and is on target to exceed 20 percent under contract or delivered by 2010.

With the Solel-MSP-1 announcement, and other recently signed renewable agreements, PG&E now has contracts to provide18 percent of its future energy supply from renewable sources.

PG&E has recently signed several other renewable energy agreements including an 85 MW wind project with PPM Energy, 7 MW of utility-scale solar projects with Cleantech America and GreenVolts, and a 25.5 MW contract with Western GeoPower, Inc. for a new geothermal energy facility in Sonoma County, California. PG&E is seeking regulatory approval of these five renewable energy contracts.

California’s RPS Program requires each utility to increase its procurement of eligible renewable generating resources by one percent of load per year to achieve a twenty percent renewables goal by 2010. The RPS Program was passed by the Legislature and is managed by California’s Public Utilities Commission and Energy Commission.

Solel Solar Systems also provides key technology components for new solar thermal plants currently under construction in the U.S. and in Spain. In addition, Solel and Sacyr-Vallehermoso are jointly building solar power plants in Spain and Solel recently completed the upgrading of more than 100 MW of solar facilities in California.

Solel‘s headquarters, manufacturing plant, research and development center are in Beit Shemesh, Israel with its U.S. development office in Los Angeles, California.

For more information about Solel, please visit the website at pge.com.

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July 26 Videos of The Day – NOW THAT’S FISHY – UNIVERSAL DENTAL CARE – UNCHAIN THAT WUS – July 16 Photos of The Day – GROUNDBREAKING FOR CROCKER AMAZON SOCCER FIELDS – Babies born today will be domineering – Live radar and weather forecast

July 26 Videos of The Day
NOW THAT’S FISHY

UNIVERSAL DENTAL CARE

UNCHAIN THAT WUS

July 26 Photos of The Day
GROUNDBREAKING FOR CROCKER AMAZON SOCCER FIELDS
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PHOTOS BY BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

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JULY 26 BIRTHDAY LORE
You are capable and dependable, although rather domineering. You are fond of good literature and are a fluent and intelligent talker and an amusing entertainer. You prefer the company of the opposite sex. Marry young, and your home life will be congenial and happy.

ADVICE FOR JULY 26
Squirt fresh lemon juice on windowsills and the bottom of doors to keep ants from coming into the house.

JULY 26 WORD OF THE DAY
Pareidolia. Defintion: The erroneous or fanciful perception of a pattern or meaning in something that is actually ambiguous or random — like the Man in the Moon or animals in cloud formations or religious images in tortillas.

JULY 26 IN HISTORY
The SS Andrea Doria sunk near Nantucket Lightship, MA, 1956. Catskill, New York, and Westfield, Massachusetts, each got 15 inches of rain, causing flash floods and enormous erosion damage, 1819.

REALTIME SAN FRANCISCO WEATHER
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Thursday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, cloudy through mid morning, then gradual clearing, with a high near 69. West southwest wind between 8 and 11 mph.

Thursday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, increasing clouds, with a low around 56. West southwest wind between 7 and 11 mph.

Friday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, cloudy through mid morning, then gradual clearing, with a high near 70. West wind between 7 and 13 mph.

Friday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 57. West wind between 8 and 13 mph.

Saturday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 71.

Saturday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 57.

Sunday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 74.

Sunday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a low around 56.

Monday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 73.

Monday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 55.

Tuesday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 73.

Tuesday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 58.

Wednesday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 72.

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BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Bill Wilson is a veteran freelance photographer whose work is published by San Francisco and East Bay media. Bill embraced photography at the age of eight. In recent years, his photos capture historic record of the San Francisco LGBT community in the Bay Area Reporter (BAR). Bill has contributed to the Sentinel for the past three years.

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LATEST SAN FRANCISCO RESTAURANT REVIEWS, ratings, food and wine special events now available through Visa USA

Visa USA today announced the launch of an enhanced Visa Signature Dining Web site and a unique partnership with Zagat Survey, one of the most trusted resources for restaurant ratings and reviews.

The new site was built to fulfill Visa Signature cardholders’ appetite for epicurean experiences and information, enabling them to view Zagat’s restaurant ratings and reviews; access unique experiences, such as wine tastings, cooking classes and private chef events; and make dining reservations through the Visa Signature Concierge.

“Visa Signature cardholders have a clear affinity for fine wine and food, and they dine out seven times every two weeks on average,” said Jim McCarthy, senior vice president, Visa USA.

“They want to savor every experience — from casual dinners to tasting the country’s best food and wine. Our epicurean offerings help them do this by providing unique information and access to gourmet events that appeal to their desire to refine their palate.”

Research indicates that the new affluent — Visa Signature’s core audience, defined as U.S. households with $125,000 or more in annual income — rely on the internet when seeking information and making decisions, including where to dine.

Affluent consumers are 73 percent more likely than the average consumer to be heavy Internet users.1 And the overwhelming majority of Visa Signature cardholders (92 percent) who make restaurant reservations online tend also to research restaurants on the Internet.

Through the site, time-stretched affluent consumer has an easy way to pursue their epicurean interests online, where they most often go for information.
The site features information on fine dining and wine, as well as a point of entry to unique epicurean events, including:

Complimentary access to the latest Zagat restaurant ratings and reviews.

Access to epicurean events through partnerships with Sonoma County Vintners, Bon Appétit and Gourmet. These events provide opportunities to taste the best food and wine in the country and include unforgettable Sonoma wine country experiences, private dinners with chefs and wine makers, and wine and food pairing events.

Special benefits at more than 40 Sonoma County wineries, including complimentary wine tastings and discounts on purchases.

Cooking classes through a new partnership with the Institute of Culinary Education (ICE).

Dining reservations at restaurants worldwide through the Visa Signature Concierge.

Unique Zagat Offerings for Visa Signature Cardholders

By Visa’s new partnership with Zagat Survey, Visa Signature cardholders can enjoy access to Zagat information, which is based on the opinions of thousands of avid restaurant-goers worldwide. The Visa Signature Dining site enables cardholders to learn what other discerning diners think about new restaurants via Zagat’s online community of food and wine enthusiasts.

They will also receive discounts on subscriptions to ZAGAT.com, which offers unlimited access to ratings and reviews for restaurants in 85 cities worldwide, nightlife in 23 cities, hotels in 103 countries and attractions in 158 cities.

Visa Signature cardholders who want to stay informed while on the move can receive discounted subscriptions to ZAGAT TO GO. ZAGAT TO GO gives users mobile access to restaurant ratings and reviews, as well as information on the top bars, nightclubs and lounges, the world’s top hotels, and top U.S. golf courses via PDA’s and cell phones.

Cardholders can find exactly what they’re looking for quickly and easily, and they can add reservations directly to their PDA calendar.

“Visa Signature cardholders have a distinctive taste for all things epicurean. Through this new partnership, we’re combining the shared experiences of 300,000 savvy Zagat surveyors with Visa’s broad offerings to give their cardholders the information they want to help them make the best decisions on where to dine,” said Tim Zagat, CEO of Zagat Survey.

Rewards and Benefits That Help Cardholders Get the Most out of Life

From benefits that save time to benefits that safeguard purchases, Visa Signature helps cardholders get the most out of life. In addition to a choice of numerous airline, hotel and other premium reward partners, cardholders enjoy access to around-the-clock complimentary concierge services through the Visa Signature Concierge; epicurean events and reservations at the hottest restaurants; premium merchant offers; and access to exclusive events such as the Olympics, Super Bowl and the Tony Awards. Since the Visa Signature card is accepted at millions of merchants worldwide, cardholders have even more opportunities to do everything on their life’s list of things to do by using the extraordinary benefits of Visa Signature.
About Visa USA.

See Related: DINING

See Related BE GLAD FOR SMALL RESTAURANT OWNERS AND THE JUDICIAL THIRD BRANCH OF GOVERNMENT

Business Wire

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JULY 25 – Exhibition on the Life and Times of San Francisco Mayor Edward Robeson Taylor begins – Symbol of 1907 City Recovery

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San Francisco Mayor Edward Robeson Taylor

The City Redeemed: An Exhibition on the Life and Times of Mayor Edward Robeson Taylor

This exhibition explores the life of Mayor Edward Robeson Taylor, an extraordinary personality and symbol of recovery for the city of San Francisco following the 1906 Earthquake and Fire.

Taylor was appointed to office in July, 1907 to fill the vacancy occurring by the conviction and imprisonment of Mayor Eugene Schmitz and he served until January, 1910.

During his administration, he reorganized City government, began to rebuild devastated City buildings, headed off a bubonic plague epidemic, secured the first Federal permits for the Hetch Hetchy water system and started the Municipal Railway.

Among his many achievements in his personal life, Taylor was Dean of Hastings Law School for twenty years, a physician and President of the Cooper Medical School which became the Stanford Medical School, a San Francisco Public Library trustee for forty years, a bibliophile and poet, and a founder and first president of the Book Club of California.

The exhibition will culminate the City’s year-long “San Francisco Rising” commemoration of the 1906 Earthquake and Fire Centennial.

It is presented in conjunction with a new biography of Edward Robeson Taylor and his 30 months as Mayor which appears in installments in the April and September issues of the Argonaut, the Journal of the San Francisco Museum and Historical Society.

Curated by James W. Haas and presented by the San Francisco History Center of the San Francisco Public Library. Funded by The Book Club of California.

Exhibition Dates:
July 25 – October 12, 2007

Location:
San Francisco History Center
San Francisco Main Library, 6th Floor
100 Larkin StreetSan Francisco, CA 94102

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This exhibition is free and open to the public.

The San Francisco Public Library

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July 25 Videos of The Day – FATHER DUFFY IS FULL OF SHIT – SPEAKER PELOSI LEADS THE PACK – THOSE EYES – July 25 Photos of The Day – WESTERN ADDITION ‘MO MAGIC’ YOUTH WORKS OF ART – Babies born today will be good in the private sector – Live radar and weather forecast

July 25 Videos of The Day
FATHER DUFFY IS FULL OF SHIT

SPEAKER PELOSI LEADS THE PACK

THOSE EYES

Photos of The Day
WESTERN ADDITION ‘MO MAGIC’ YOUTH WORKS OF ART
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The works of Western Addition children from various summer youth programs displayed at the African and African American Art and Culture Complex, located at 762 Fulton Street, San Francisco.
PHOTOS BY BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

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JULY 25 BIRTHDAY LORE
You have a magnetic personality, make friends easily, and are popular with everyone. You have good business sense and executive ability and are unusually fortunate in all your dealings. You are openhearted and sincere and love with a deep and strong devotion.

ADVICE FOR JULY 25
Fresh grass clippings make excellent garden mulch. (Don’t bunch clippings too heavily around young plants, as the grass can burn tender stalks.)

JULY 25 WORD OF THE DAY
Junk. Defintion: Pieces of old cable or old cordage, used for making gaskets, mats, swabs, etc., and when picked to pieces, forming oakum for filling the seams of ships.

JULY 25 IN HISTORY
Ulysses S. Grant received the rank of General of the Army, the first American officer to be so designated, 1866. Thirty to 40 inches of rain fell near Alvin, in southeast Texas, 1979.

REALTIME SAN FRANCISCO WEATHER
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Wednesday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, then gradually becoming mostly sunny, with a high near 70. West southwest wind between 9 and 14 mph.

Wednesday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, increasing clouds, with a low around 57. West southwest wind between 8 and 14 mph.

Thursday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, then gradually becoming mostly sunny, with a high near 70. West southwest wind between 8 and 11 mph.

Thursday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 57. West southwest wind between 8 and 11 mph.

Friday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 70.

Friday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 57.

Saturday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 71.

Saturday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a low around 57.

Sunday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 69.

Sunday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a low around 56.

Monday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 71.

Monday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a low around 55.

Tuesday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 71.

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BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Bill Wilson is a veteran freelance photographer whose work is published by San Francisco and East Bay media. Bill embraced photography at the age of eight. In recent years, his photos capture historic record of the San Francisco LGBT community in the Bay Area Reporter (BAR). Bill has contributed to the Sentinel for the past three years.

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NEWSOM LACKS LEADERSHIP ON PUBLIC SAFETY

BELIEVE IT OR WHAT
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BY PAT MURPHY
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

Mayor Newsom has not shown leadership on public safety of San Franciscans.

Instead, this San Francisco mayor strives for community consensus on how best to end street violence.

And sulks before neighborhood meetings when confronted with his effort leaving San Francisco streets vile, most recently before a Polk Street gathering of residents and merchants.

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Photos by Bill Wilson

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Consensus building began more than two years ago as a broad range of San Francisco elected leadership got behind movement toward community policing.

It speedily succeeded with a multiplicity of programs to assist those arrested — and even those at risk for arrest — with immediate community help to claim the propserity, security, and dignity every San Franciscan needs.

It also promised innovative police intervention to stop criminal behavior, with instant access to means for the desperate to find crime needless.

The best and brightest San Franciscans poured their lifesblood into delivering a two-pronged model that works.

Still, today’s reality is the streets are as murderous and vile as they were two years ago. This mayor’s streets have the feel of precursor 1920s Germany.

Newsom wisely insists, “I want to make sure we do this right,” to stop criminal behavior — which must be stopped first — without return to rousts and cracked skulls.

To match San Francisco enlightened view of police work, consensus effort locked in individualized policing techniques crafted for each each neighborhood and localized culture.

The Sentinel suggests this well intentioned autonomy resulted in many police districts not incorporating acceptable and proven policing which is working in the Tenderloin usherered by Police Captain Gary Jimenez.

Newsom needs to get it in his head that he is the only official with the authority and stature to actually make things happen — to actually lead.

But Newsom reacts as if returning safety to San Francisco streets is all about him, all about his performance.

Stopping the behavior which turned San Francisco streets vile is bigger than any mayor, bigger than any political career.

End your self-centered sulk, Mr. Mayor, and lead.

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PAT MURPHY
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
In his youth, Pat Murphy worked as a General Assignment reporter for the Richmond Independent, the Berkeley Daily Gazette, and the San Francisco Chronicle. He served as Managing Editor of the St. Albans (Vermont) Daily Messenger at age 21. Murphy also launched ValPak couponing in San Francisco, as the company’s first San Francisco franchise owner. He walked the bricks, developing ad strategy for a broad range of restaurants and merchants. Pat knows what works and what doesn’t work. His writing skill has been employed by marketing agencies, including Don Solem & Associates. He has covered San Francisco governance for the past ten years. Pat scribes an offbeat view of the human family through Believe It or What.

bill-wilson-cropped-160-pixels-mug.jpg
BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Bill Wilson is a veteran freelance photographer whose work is published by San Francisco and Bay Area media. Bill embraced photography at the age of eight. In recent years, his photos capture historic record of the San Francisco LGBT community in the Bay Area Reporter (BAR). Bill has contributed to the Sentinel for the past three years.

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BE GLAD FOR SMALL RESTAURANT OWNERS AND THE JUDICIAL THIRD BRANCH OF GOVERNMENT

BELIEVE IT OR WHAT
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BY PAT MURPHY
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

San Francisco small restaurant owners are scorned on all fronts for their federal lawsuit insisting they have the right to determine employee benefits, not the City now implementing universal health care with forced payment by restaurant owners necessary…

Our young San Francisco mayor — The Gav brooks 40 October 10 — publicly scalds restaurant owners every chance he gets for launching the lawsuit… Newsom notes threateningly he is not happy about the lawsuit

Mandated restaurant owner payment is essential to establishing universal health care… Says The Gav…

Really, Gav honey, you should be more worried about them not being happy with you… Your performance is arrogant…

Newsom, partnered with Supervisor Tom Ammiano, imposed the employer mandate provision with very little imput from restaurant owners… It was only when owners noted they had the power to resist that they were seriously ushered to a seat…

With Ammiano, quick to go brittle, snorting he had heard owner hardship complaints for ever so long…

Further, that Ammiano did not believe hardship complaints and anyway their money is needed to benefit all San Franciscans, suck it up…

Suck this up: People don’t go into business to create jobs… Or deliver benefits…

People go into business to make money, say it out loud…

To use that money to cement their unqiue dream into expanding reality… Secondarily growing that reality with new jobs, more jobs, and newly employed San Franciscans receiving new benefits…

It is odious that in a town which works so hard to maintain neighborhood character, in a town where neighborhood character is greatly defined by world famed unique eateries, the venal attempting to tap altruist sentiment would treat our unique eateries with such pompous dismissal…

Owner after owner testified that the imposed mandate would close their doors and foreclose opening of new small restaurants…

That trend is already underway… Preponderence of new restaurant openings in San Francisco are low-cost formula food fops…

Be glad we have that judicial third branch of government, and go out and encourage owners who work 14 to 16 hours every day to keep their dream alive and your neighborhood unique…

See Related: HEALTH CARE

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PAT MURPHY
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
In his youth, Pat Murphy worked as a General Assignment reporter for the Richmond Independent, the Berkeley Daily Gazette, and the San Francisco Chronicle. He served as Managing Editor of the St. Albans (Vermont) Daily Messenger at age 21. Murphy also launched ValPak couponing in San Francisco, as the company’s first San Francisco franchise owner. He walked the bricks, developing ad strategy for a broad range of restaurants and merchants. Pat knows what works and what doesn’t work. His writing skill has been employed by marketing agencies, including Don Solem & Associates. He has covered San Francisco governance for the past ten years. Pat scribes an offbeat view of the human family through Believe It or What.

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SAN FRANCISCO FEDERAL COURT rules consumer lawsuit against Cingular-AT&T may proceed

Santa Monica, CA — A lawsuit charging that Cingular (now AT&T) engages in false and misleading advertising when offering “rebates” on cell phones may proceed, a federal court has ruled.

The suit, brought under California’s consumer protection laws, states that the cell phone company promised to pay rebates to people who bought cell phones, and advertised discounted prices that reflected the promised rebate. But instead of getting a rebate check, purchasers received a “VISA Reward card” that can only be used under numerous restrictions and for a limited period of time. By the time consumers found out they were not getting a rebate check, it was too late to cancel Cingular’s wireless service without paying an Early Termination Fee of $175.

“In their intense marketing for cellular services, cell phone companies make price the paramount focus,” said Foundation for Taxpayer and Consumer Rights’ Harvey Rosenfield, one of the lawyers in the case.

“Cingular told consumers that they would ultimately pay a discounted price, once the rebate was received. In some cases, consumers were led to believe the phone would be ‘free’ — that it would end up costing them nothing after the rebate. But instead of getting money back, consumers get a VISA Reward card. Purchasers never got the promised discount. None of this was made clear to consumers. This deceitful practice hurts consumers and other cell phone companies that advertise honestly.”

Court Rejects Cingular’s Move to Stop Case

The case was filed in California state court on behalf of all affected consumers in June 2006, but Cingular transferred the case to federal court in San Francisco. In May, Cingular asked the federal court to dismiss the suit, arguing that consumers were not harmed or misled and that California’s consumer protection laws do not prevent the company from engaging in the practice. Last week, the court rejected Cingular’s motion, allowing the case to proceed. The court’s ruling states:

“The court finds that a reasonable consumer, upon seeing an advertisement that promises a ‘rebate’ of a certain amount, would generally understand that advertisement to mean that the amount will be returned to the consumer in cash, check or its equivalent… . The more terms, conditions and restrictions that are placed upon the form of tender, the less equivalent it becomes to cash or check… .” The “numerous terms and conditions” of the VISA Reward Card “raise an issue of fact about whether the VISA cards could be reasonably interpreted as equivalent to cash or check.”

Ads Changed After Suit, But Still Mislead

After the suit was filed, the company, now called AT&T after its merger with Cingular, modified some of its ads to state, in fine print, that the advertised price was “after debit card.” However, the company’s web site still refers to a “mail-in rebate card.” Consumer advocates contend the new language remains misleading.

The lawsuit asks the court to order the company to stop the practice, and to provide refunds to consumers.

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SCHWARZENEGGR ANNOUNCES new appointments

Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger today announced the following appointments:

Derral Adams, 59, of Fresno , has been appointed warden of California State Prison, Corcoran. He has served as acting warden since 2006 and previously served as warden of the Substance Abuse Treatment Facility at California State Prison, Corcoran from 2000 and 2006. From 1995 to 2000, Adams served as chief deputy warden for the Central California Women’s Facility, where he also served as acting warden in 2000. Previously, he was a correctional administrator during the opening of Wasco State Prison in 1990 and continued in this position until 1995. He also served as the equal employment opportunity administrator for Wasco State Prison during this period. Adams began his career with the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation in 1979 as a carpenter at San Quentin State Prison. Prior to working in corrections, he was a construction manager for Yancey Construction from 1976 to 1977 and Sweda Construction from 1977 to 1979. Adams served in the U.S. Army from 1967 to 1970. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $129,108. Adams is a Republican.

Ruben Barrales, 45, of Del Mar, has been appointed to the San Diego County Fair Board of Directors (22nd District Agricultural Association). He has served as president and chief executive officer of the San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce since 2006. Barrales previously served as a deputy assistant to President George W. Bush from 2001 to 2006 where he was the President’s liaison to state and local elected officials. Prior to that, he served on the San Mateo County Board of Supervisors for four years. Barrales is a member of the California Speaker’s Commission on State and Local Government Finance, the California Commission of Local Governance for the 21st Century and the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research. This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no salary. Barrales is a Republican.

Steven Brown, 60, of Chico , has been appointed to the State Board of Fire Services. He has served as the fire chief of the Chico Fire Department since 1995. Previously, he held several positions with the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection from 1964 to 1995 including chief of the CDF/Butte County Fire Department. He served in the U.S. Army as a 1st lieutenant from 1968 to 1971. Brown is a member of the California Fire Chiefs Association, California Firefighter’s Association and the International Association of Fire Chiefs. This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no salary. Brown is a Republican.

Jerry Davies, 65, of Sacramento , has been appointed to the State Board of Fire Services. He has served as director of media relations for the Farmers Insurance Group since 2006. Davies previously was director of communications for the Personal Insurance Federation of California from 1995 to 2006. He currently owns Davies Communications and also served as president from 1985 to 1995. Prior to that, Davies served as director of communications for Farmers Alliance Insurance Companies from 1982 to 1985 and was regional director for the Insurance Information Institute in New York from 1975 to 1982. He is a member of the Fire Safe Council Board of Directors. This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no salary. Davies is a Republican.

Kim Fletcher, 79, of Rancho Santa Fe, has been appointed to the San Diego County Fair Board of Directors (22nd District Agricultural Association). He has served as president of Investors Leasing Corporation since 1992. Fletcher previously was a trainee and chair of the HomeFed Bank Board of Directors from 1950 to 1992. He is director emeritus of the University of San Diego Board of Trustees, past chair of United Way , past member of the Sharp Memorial Hospital Board of Directors and is active in San Dieguito Boys and Girls Club. This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no salary. Fletcher is a Republican.

Vivian Hardage, 53, of Rancho Santa Fe, has been appointed to the San Diego County Fair Board of Directors (22nd District Agricultural Association). She has served on the Board of Directors since 2005 and co-founded the Vision of Children Foundation in 1995 where she also serves as a board member. Hardage previously was a realtor for Plaza Del Sol Real Estate from 1984 to 1989. She is a member and founder of the Fairbanks Republican Women Federated and is a member of the Rancho Santa Fe Women’s Fund and Country Friends. This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no salary. Hardage is a Republican.

Richard O. Johnson, M.D., MPH, 61, of Mammoth Lakes , has been appointed to the California Emergency Council. He has served as the public health officer for Mono County since 2002 and also has served as interim public health officer for Inyo County since 2006. Additionally, Johnson has served as a pediatrician for the Southern Mono Healthcare District at Mammoth Hospital since 1996. Previously, he was a pediatrician and managing partner at Pediatric Associates of Pasadena from 1979 to 1996 and served at Huntington Memorial Hospital as coordinator of the pediatric residency program with the Children’s Hospital Los Angeles from 1979 to 1983. Prior to that, Johnson was a staff neonatologist from 1977 to 1979 and also served his residency in pediatrics from 1975 to 1977 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center . His experience includes two years of service as a medical doctor in the U.S. Army Reserve and two years as a civilian staff pediatrician and acting medical director for the Hoa Khanh Children’s Hospital in Danang , South Vietnam . This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no salary. Johnson is a Republican.

Barry Nussbaum, 52, of Rancho Santa Fe, has been appointed to the San Diego County Fair Board of Directors (22nd District Agricultural Association). He has served on the Board of Directors since 1999 including four terms as president and currently serves as chair of fair operations. Nussbaum has also served as chief executive officer for BNC Real Estate since 1977. He co-founded Digital Orchid in 2002 and PR Nutrition in 1992. Nussbaum served as a board member of Frisch’s Restaurant Incorporated from 1997 to 1999. He is actively involved in the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, Jewish National Fund and the Anti-Defamation League. This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no salary. Nussbaum is a Republican.

Susan Phillips, 54, of Granite Bay , has been appointed assistant division chief of financial assistance for the Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD). She has over 22 years of California government service and is currently serving as staff services manager III for HCD. From 2000 to 2004, Phillips served as a staff services manager I for the California Student Aid Commission. Previously, she worked for the State Water Resources Control Board where she was a staff services manager I from 1998 to 2000 and associate government program analyst from 1991 to 1996. From 1996 to 1998, she was a staff services manager I for the Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs. Prior to that, Phillips served as an associate government program analyst for the Department of Education from 1987 to 1991 and was an employment officer for the Employment Development Department from 1976 to 1978. She left state service for two years to work as a housing specialist for the City of Pomona from 1978 to 1980. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $86,070. Phillips is a Democrat.

Daniel Robbins, 40, of Calabasas, has been appointed to the Commission on Uniform State Laws. Since 1996, he has worked for the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) where he currently serves as vice president and associate general counsel. Robbins has previously held several positions with MPAA including vice president and chief technology counsel; vice president and senior technology counsel; and vice president and counsel. Prior to joining MPAA, he was an associate for the law firm Graham & James from 1992 to 1996 and held the same position with the law firm Pepper, Hamilton & Scheetz in 1992. He served on the State Bar Business Law Section Uniform Commercial Code Committee from 1998 to 2001. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Robbins is a Republican.

Aubry Stone, 62, of Sacramento , has been appointed to the Commission for Economic Development. He has served as president and chief executive officer for the California Black Chamber of Commerce since 1994. Stone previously was a branch manager for Metropolitan Life from 1985 to 1994. He also served in the U.S. Air Force from 1962 to 1984 before retiring as superintendent of operations. Stone is a past member of the Sacramento Metro Chamber, Mayor’s Economic Development Council and the Capitol Area Development Authority Board of Directors. This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no salary. Stone is a Democrat.

Ashley Swearengin, 35, of Fresno , has been appointed to the Commission for Economic Development. She has served as executive director for the Office of Community and Economic Development at California State University , Fresno since 2000. Swearengin has also served as chief operating officer of the Fresno Regional Jobs Initiative since 2003 and lead executive for the California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley since 2006. Previously, she was director of the Central Valley Business Incubator from 1993 to 2000 and development coordinator for the law firm Baker, Manock & Jensen from 1995 to 1998. Prior to that, she was a client services representative for the law firm Jackson, Emerich, Pedreira & Nahigian from 1994 to 1995. Swearengin is a board member of the Fresno West Coalition for Economic Development Community Development Corporation, the Fresno Citizens for Good Government Board of Directors and the Fresno Business Council. This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no salary. Swearengin is a Republican.

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NEW BUSINESS REVIEW LAUNCH benefits San Francisco Bay Area underprivileged children

Neighbor and My New Red Shoes today launched a partnership to build a bank of “wisdom” through reviews of local businesses and answers to user-posted questions while at the same time raising charitable funds.

From today until August 25th, every review entered at Neighbor.com under the code SHOES will contribute $1 to My New Red Shoes, up to a total of $10,000. My New Red Shoes provides brand new shoes and school clothing to underprivileged children in the San Francisco Bay Area.

“We believe this represents a win-win for all of us,” said Jacqueline Linder, CEO of Neighbor.

“Every review represents a contribution to these children, but it’s also a valuable piece of local wisdom. At the same time, it’s great word-of-mouth marketing for the local businesses.”

Heather Hopkins, Founder and Director of My New Red Shoes, said, “This is a great initiative: local businesses, local people, local kids. I believe our community will step up to the challenge to write 10,000 reviews by August 25th. Since this amount represents nearly 10% of My New Red Shoes’ annual budget, the campaign will make a huge difference in the lives of hundreds of students who will go to school wearing new clothing and a smile.”

About My New Red Shoes

My New Red Shoes is a nonprofit organization that provides brand new school clothing and shoes to underprivileged children in the Bay Area. It was founded by Heather Hopkins after hearing a story from her mother that changed Heather’s life. Growing up in a poor family, Heather’s mother dreaded the first day of school, worried that she would not have anything presentable to wear when she walked through her classroom doors in September. My New Red Shoes is the first 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization focused on providing new school clothing to children throughout Santa Clara and San Mateo counties.

About Neighbor

At Neighbor.com, we capture and organize local wisdom, and make it accessible to everyone. Our wisdom consists of questions and answers posted by our community, along with reviews of local businesses and organizations. We use a unique Q&A format to capture and showcase the special “attributes” that people naturally use in conversation when discussing services, so that others can find the businesses that meet their particular needs. Neighbor is privately held.

For more info and to write a review: Neighbor.com. For charity info: MyNewRedShoes.org.

Business Wire

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THE HOTEL CASABLANCA – World Premiere of Thomas Pasatieri Opera at San Francisco’s Cowell Theater

Singers of the Merola Opera Program debut work August 3rd and 5th

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By Seán Martinfield
Sentinel Fine Arts Critic
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

MEROLA OPERA PROGRAM has announced casting details for the forthcoming World Premiere of Thomas Pasatieri’s “The Hotel Casablanca”, scheduled for two performances on August 3rd and 5th at the Fort Mason Center Cowell Theatre. Joseph Illick will conduct the 17-member chamber orchestra in a production directed and designed by Richard Kagey. The Hotel Casablanca is sponsored by Reid and Peggy Dennis.

“The Hotel Casablanca” will be presented during Merola’s 50th Anniversary Season and is the first world premiere opera ever to be produced by the renowned Merola Opera Program, the nation’s leading summer training program for 29 young professional opera singers, coach accompanists and directors. This year’s program began June 4 and features artists from around the globe.

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TAMARA WAPINSKY, Soprano and TOM CORBEIL, Bass-Baritone

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KENNETH KELLOGG, Bass and ANDREW BIDLACK, Tenor

Following the Pasatieri premiere, the highly anticipated Merola Grand Finale concert will take to the stage of the War Memorial Opera House Aug. 18 with Merola graduate Patrick Summers on the podium leading members of the San Francisco Opera Orchestra. The Grand Finale concert will feature the singers in a program of concert arias and ensemble works spanning a variety of composers from Monteverdi to Sondheim. The annual Grand Finale concert will formally conclude the Merola Opera Program’s Golden Anniversary Season.

“The Hotel Casablanca”, Pasatieri’s 19th opera set to an original libretto by the composer, is a two-act comedy set in the summer heat of Texas 1948, and follows a certain wealthy Texan couple and their attempts to “toughen up” their 25 year-old nephew visiting from New York. Based on the Feydeau play A Flea in Her Ear, Pasatieri’s inventive plot takes place at the mythical Double-T Ranch and the seedy Hotel Casablanca riddled with assorted eccentric guests. The opera is composed for nine principal singers and will be sung in English.

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MEREDITH WOODEND, Mezzo-Soprano and JASON PLOURDE, Baritone

The featured artists are tenor Andrew Bidlack (Charles Carter, nephew of Tom Carter); baritone Jason Plourde (Burton, butler at the Double T Ranch); soprano Tamara Wapinsky (Tallulah Carter, wife of Tom Carter); mezzo-soprano Paula Murrihy (Lucy Perez, Tallulah’s former vaudeville partner); bass-baritone Tom Corbeil (Tom Carter, owner of the Double T Ranch); baritone Nathaniel Hackmann (Raul Perez, bull breeder and husband of Lucy Perez); bass Kenneth Kellogg (Tobias, manager of the Double T Ranch); mezzo-soprano Meredith Woodend (Miss Pooder, proprietor of the Hotel Casablanca); and soprano Jamie-Rose Guarrine (Veronique, a Hotel Casablanca employee).

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JAMIE-ROSE GUARRINE, Soprano and NATHANIEL HACKMANN, Baritone

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THOMAS PASATIERI, Composer and PAULA MURRIHY, Mezzo-Soprano

Pasatieri was born in New York, 1945. He was an accomplished pianist and performer by the age of ten and a composer at age fifteen. As a teenager, he studied with the renowned French teacher, Nadia Boulanger. He entered the Juilliard School at age sixteen and eventually became the school’s first recipient of a doctoral degree. Among his 19 operas are La Divina (1966), Padrevía (1967), Black Widow (1972), The Trial of Mary Lincoln (1972), Signor Deluso (1974), Washington Square (1976), Before Breakfast (1980), Three Sisters (1986), and his best known work, The Seagull (1972), which received its premiere recording in 2003 from Albany Records. Earlier this year, Pasatieri presented the world premiere of another one of his operas, Frau Margot, for the Fort Worth Opera.

In addition to his opera works, Pasatieri has composed numerous chamber pieces, choral works, and hundreds of songs for many of the leading opera singers of the past three decades. Now living in Los Angeles, Pasatieri has been drawn to the film industry. His film orchestrations may be heard in The Good German, Road to Perdition, American Beauty, The Little Mermaid, The Shawshank Redemption, Fried Green Tomatoes, Legends of the Fall and Scent of a Woman.

Conductor Joseph Illick worked with Pasatieri on the recent premiere of Frau Margot at Fort Worth Opera, and Washington Square for Manhattan School of Music. Illick’s credits include Salome for Fort Worth Opera, Un Ballo in Maschera for Lyric Opera of Kansas City, Madama Butterfy for Opera Carolina, and The Mikado for Opera Theatre of St, Louis. Later this season, he will return to Fort Worth for Turandot and Of Mice and Men.

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JOSEPH ILLICK, Conductor

Director and scenic designer Richard Kagey recently directed the premiere of Pasatieri’s Frau Margot. His upcoming engagements include Crazy For You and Lysistrata at the Seagle Music Colony, The Hotel Casablanca for the University of Kentucky, Cold Sassy Tree for Atlanta Opera, Of Mice and Men for Fort Worth Opera, and director of the soon to-be-opened Energy Center for the Performing Arts in Atlanta.

For tickets, call the San Francisco Opera Box Office: 415-864-3330

Seán recommends:
CDLETTER TO WARSAW – Thomas Pasatieri’s song cycle featuring soprano Jane Eaglen, conducted by Gerard Schwarz.
CD THE SEAGULL – Thomas Pasatieri’s opera based on Chekov’s classic play; David Gilbert conducting. The cast includes baritone Raymond Ayers as “Constantine”, soprano Amy Gough as “Arkadina”, soprano Amy Shoremount as “Nina”, and baritone Matthew Worth “Trigorin”.

For your dining pleasure before or after “The Hotel Casablanca”, Seán suggests:
McCormick & Kuleto’s Seafood Restaurant – At Ghirardelli Square, 900 North Point Street. Try the truly operatic Jumbo Shrimp Pomodoro with Garlic, Basil, Chili Flakes, Pomodoro Sauce and Linguine.

Ana Mandara – Modern Vietnamese cuisine at 891 Beach Street. Be sure to include a side order duet of Grilled Japanese Eggplant With Scallion Oil and the Sticky Black Rice .

See Seán’s recent articles:
NEIL SEDAKA and PATTI LUPONE – Summer in The City at Symphony Hall
JOHNNY MATHIS – Gets Misty with San Francisco Symphony
INSIGNIFICANT OTHERS – A Conversation with Composer Jay Kuo
IPHIGÉNIE EN TAURIDE – Everything old is new again at SF Opera
NORMA SHEARER Flick Opens the San Francisco Silent Film Festival
JERSEY BOYS – Earth Angels invade Curran Theatre! Cast #2: Their Eyes Adore You!
JEANETTE MacDONALD – First Lady of “San Francisco”
DER ROSENKAVALIER – A Viennese Bon-Bon At San Francisco Opera
An Interview with PASCAL MOLAT, Principal Dancer of the San Francisco Ballet
DAVID GOCKLEY’S “DON GIOVANNI” – Semper Fi!
SAMSON vs DELILAH at AT&T Park – Can Stadium Survive Biblical Shearing?
SPIDER-MAN 3, An All-American Cinematic Marvel
JOAN of ARC – Dolora Zajick, A Simmering Success!
THE DAMNATION OF FAUST – Absolute Heaven at Davies Symphony Hall

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San Francisco Sentinel’s Fine Arts Critic Seán Martinfield is a native San Franciscan. He is a Theatre Arts Graduate from San Francisco State University, a professional singer, and well-known private vocal coach to Bay Area actors and singers of all ages and persuasions. His clients have appeared in Broadway National Tours including Wicked, Aïda, Miss Saigon, Rent, Bye Bye Birdie, in theatres and cabarets throughout the Bay Area, and are regularly featured in major City events including Diva Fest, Gay Pride, and Halloween In The Castro. As an Internet consultant in vocal development and audition preparation he has published thousands of responses to those seeking his advice concerning singing techniques, professional and academic auditions, and careers in the Performing Arts. Ask him a question on AllExperts.com . If you would like to build up your vocal performance chops and participate in the Bay Area’s rich theatrical scene, e-mail him at: seanmartinfield@att.net.

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PESKIN UNITES LABOR BEHIND MUNI REFORM CHARTER AMENDMENT

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Supervisor Aaron Peskin, left, leads announcement of labor support with San Francisco Labor Council Executive Director Tim Paulson, center, and San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom.
PHOTOS BY BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

BY PAT MURPHY
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

San Francisco labor leaders Monday endorsed a proposal to reform Muni by giving its governing Metropolitican Transit Agency (MTA) Commission more autonomy.

Supervisor Aaron Peskin, president of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors and author of the Charter Amendment ballot measure, made the 2:50 p.m. announcement with Mayor Gavin in a City Hall International Room press conference.

Although the announcement was scheduled for 2:30 p.m., Peskin conducted shuttle diplomacy between labor leaders and the Mayor’s Office until the press conference began.

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Peskin reported agreement came through unparalled cooperation.

“This has truly been the result of unparalled cooperation between the house of labor, the Board of Supervisors, and the Mayor’s Office aimed at fundamental reform of the most vital functions that a city can provide. That, of course, is smooth delivery of transportation.

“I want to thank Nat Ford (MTA executive director) and the (MTA) commissioners that are gathered here, but most importantly to thank the representatives of all of the unions that make Muni work every single day.

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“They’re all here — the Transportation Workers Union, the Service Employees International Union, the Machinists, the MEA, the International Federation of Professional Technical Engineers Local 21. All of them have entered now into several weeks of good faith negotiations.

“We are here today to announce to you that we do have an agreement,” stated Peskin.

The measure, which the Board of Supervisors must approve for placement on the November ballot, will provide more accountability and City revenues, the mayor added.

“That is another big component of this initiative,” Newsom stated.

“It provides more revenue. It provides more accountability and with that accountability comes more responsibility that’s now placed in the hands of the MTA.

“I think it’s going to help support the reform efforts… and support Nat Ford and his team that have come together that are doing good work.”

Newsom looked toward the November election.

“I’m very hopeful that the Board will pass it and very encouraged that with this kind of momentum that we can get the kind of votes that we need this November to pass it,” Newsom observed.

The Board of Supervisors will vote on ballot placement July 31, Peskin said.

Collaboration made agreement possible, noted labor leader Tim Paulson.

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Tim Paulson, left, and Mayor Newsom finalize the deal.

“We are the workers,” Paulson began, “we are the workers who are in this room who actually perform the jobs at Muni that make the buses run on time.

“For us to be able to sit down in a proactive way, to be part of the team to make sure that we are going to move forward so that San Francisco is an even better transportation City, we’re going to work even harder to do that.”

Early skepticism by drivers turned to process involvement, their union president reported.

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Transport Workers Union Local 250-A President Irwin Lum, left, with MTA Executive Director Nat Ford.

“I think that the issue is we feel on behalf of the operators that we are part of the solution in trying to correct some of the problems,” Lum stated.

“That’s why we stayed in the process to try to change the legislation — that we have a say in what’s going on and I think the majority of our people we concerned about making Muni the number one system and making it accountable to the public.”

Months long good faith negotiation culminated in measure final version, Peskin observed.

“I think everybody really came to the conclusion that we’re all really doing this in good faith and that we’re all part of the solution,” assessed Peskin.

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PAT MURPHY
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
In his youth, Pat Murphy worked as a General Assignment reporter for the Richmond Independent, the Berkeley Daily Gazette, and the San Francisco Chronicle. He served as Managing Editor of the St. Albans (Vermont) Daily Messenger at age 21. Murphy also launched ValPak couponing in San Francisco, as the company’s first San Francisco franchise owner. He walked the bricks, developing ad strategy for a broad range of restaurants and merchants. Pat knows what works and what doesn’t work. His writing skill has been employed by marketing agencies, including Don Solem & Associates. He has covered San Francisco governance for the past ten years. Pat scribes an offbeat view of the human family through Believe It or What.

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BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Bill Wilson is a veteran freelance photographer whose work is published by San Francisco and East Bay media. Bill embraced photography at the age of eight. In recent years, his photos capture historic record of the San Francisco LGBT community in the Bay Area Reporter (BAR). Bill has contributed to the Sentinel for the past three years.

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STREET VIOLENCE: Two shootings – One shot dead in Visitacion Valley, no arrests – Tourists treated to collapse of midday shooting victim, no arrests

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Officers are investigating the second shooting to occur on Monday, a San Francisco police dispatcher said this morning.

Around 11:49 p.m. police received reports of gunshots on the 100 block of Blythdale Avenue in the Visitacion Valley neighborhood, according to a dispatcher. Responding officers found a victim suffering gunshot wounds. He was pronounced dead at the scene.

There are no suspects in custody at this time, a dispatcher said.

The first shooting, which was reported at about 2:10 p.m., occurred a few feet from Market Street, Sgt. Steve Mannina said. He was shot at Turk and Mason streets.

The man, whose identity was not released, was transported to San Francisco General Hospital with non-life threatening injuries, police Sgt. Steve Mannina said.

A silver sedan pulled up to a Turk Street curb. The victim approached the sedan and then broke away from it. Shots were fired and the victim went east on Market Street, Mannina said.

Before he made it to Fifth Street, onlookers assisted him until paramedics arrived, Mannina said.

The suspects fled westbound on Turk Street.

Bay City News

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