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TOUR DE FORKS – What could be better than dining in Italy

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BY DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA

What could be better than traveling to Italy with three in-the-know food hounds? Lisa Goldman, Melissa Joachim, and Giuseppe Ricotta don’t think anything beats that! … Which is why, for 5 years now, they’ve been leading culinary tours through Puglia, Sicily, and soon Emilia Romano. The team focuses on uncovering hard-to-find restaurants and specialty ingredients.

One such hidden treasure is a certain squid ink pasta found in Palermo. I’ve been sworn to starchy secrecy about the exact where-abouts of the primo pasta, but it’s tid-bits like that that makes Tour de Forks the number one way to travel to Italy.

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Tour de Forks favorite hotel, Grand Hotel Villea Igiea, Palermo.

The tours usually last about a week and are between $5000 and $8000: a price that includes fantastic food, wine, cooking classes, accommodations, special events, and transportation within the country.

This is the ideal trip for those who want to eat well but don’t want to worry about doing the research to get the inside scoop. The best Italian restaurants are family-run, off-the-beaten path spots that often have no sign, no phone, and no way of getting in unless you know the mama.

Lisa, Melissa, and Giuseppe know many mamas and love to share the big Italian love. Besides surreptitious squid ink, they’ll feed you other Italian delicacies in the sumptuous home of a Baron and Baroness. You’ll dine at a table with a centerpiece that hails directly from Versailles. Goldman says that a successful food tour is about, “finding a balance,” so in addition to gracing the homes of royalty, you’ll head to down-home markets where farmers will wow you with fresh produce, cheese, and the likes.

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Blood oranges, Capo Market, Palermo.

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Fish stall, Capo Market, Palermo.

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Greek Temple, Segesta.

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Cloisters, Monreale.

Tour de Forks caps their tours at twelve people so whether you are at a dinner party or getting a private tour of the markets, it will always be an intimate ordeal. It’s easy to “keep people enthusiastic” with activities like visiting salt marshes, tasting artisanal salame makers, and checking out an olive oil museum. The tours are organized in such a way that no one will get too full to enjoy a single bite, by mixing adventure with relaxation, and light bites with decadent dinners.

Tour de Forks has been featured in New York Magazine, Bon Appétit, and Oggi Magazine. And famed New York City chef, Anita Lo, is a huge fan. She makes a good point about visiting a country as diverse and delicious as Italy: “You could do it on your own, but chances are, even if you have several good guide books, you’re going to be disappointed with more than just a couple of meals, and you won’t get the personalized VIP treatment you get by having a few famous, local food professionals showing you around as you do on Tour de Forks.” It’s true. Who else could show you “elite experiences customarily reserved for restaurant royalty, including jet setting to the island of Pantelleria for a Passito wine tasting or nibbling on sea urchin and bottarga – tuna caviar- while listening to the secrets of Sicily’s star chefs are all standard fare?” I’m sold!

To find out how you can sign up for the quickly filling fall 2007 trips, visit tourdeforks.com.

New York Social Diary

See Related: TRAVELING TO VENICE – A City in its Glory

See Related: DINING

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SEPTEMBER 4 Photos of The Day – THE FISH ARE JUMPING IN SUMMERTIME LAKE MERCED – Video of The Day – GONE FISHING WITH SATCHMO AND POOCHY – Babies born today will be tempestuous – Live radar and weather forecast

September 4 Photos of The Day
THE FISH ARE JUMPING IN SUMMERTINE LAKE MERCED
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Apparently all the people scared off the trout but Chiara,Chris And Alyssa Antipa went home happy — even though when asked someone gave them the fish. It’ll fry up just the same.
PHOTOS BY BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

September 4 Video of The Day
GONE FISHING WITH SATCHMO AND POOCHY

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SEPTEMBER 4 BIRTHDAY LORE
You are quick, volatile, and tempestuous, and carry a point only by force of will. You have a keen, brilliant mind, but lack patience and perseverance. When facing failure, you give up in disgust. You are either greatly liked or intensely disliked, a loyal friend but a bitter enemy.

SEPTEMBER 4 ADVICE FOR THE DAY
It is easier to drive nails through wood if they are first pushed through a bar of soap.

SEPTEMBER 4 WORD OF THE DAY
Newel post. Definition: A post that supports the top or the bottom end of a handrail for a flight of stairs.

SEPTEMBER 4 IN HISTORY
Born: Damon Wayans (actor), 1960. Tropical storm Delia dumped very heavy rain on Galveston, Texas, resulting in flooding, 1973.

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REALTIME SAN FRANCISCO WEATHER

Today: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a high near 70. West wind between 9 and 15 mph.

Tonight: Mostly cloudy, with a low around 56. West wind between 12 and 15 mph becoming calm. Winds could gust as high as 18 mph.

Wednesday: Mostly cloudy through mid morning, then gradual clearing, with a high near 76. Calm wind becoming west between 8 and 11 mph.

Wednesday Night: Clear, with a low around 57. West southwest wind between 5 and 11 mph.

Thursday: Sunny, with a high near 79. Southwest wind between 5 and 11 mph.

Thursday Night: Clear, with a low around 59.

Friday: Sunny, with a high near 76.

Friday Night: Mostly clear, with a low around 59.

Saturday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 74.

Saturday Night: Partly cloudy, with a low around 57.

Sunday: Partly cloudy, with a high near 74.

Sunday Night: Partly cloudy, with a low around 57.

Monday: Partly cloudy, with a high near 73.

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BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Bill Wilson is a veteran freelance photographer whose work is published by San Francisco and East Bay media. Bill embraced photography at the age of eight. In recent years, his photos capture historic record of the San Francisco LGBT community in the Bay Area Reporter (BAR). Bill has contributed to the Sentinel for the past three years.

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REFLECTIONS on the First Day Back to School and Summers Past

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September 1955 Bill, Marie, John, and David Wilson

BY BILL WILSON

My first day of school made a profound change in our family because it wasn’t just my first day at grade one, it was also my Mother’s first day as a teacher in second grade. At the time my Father was working on a farm that was one of five farms in Lancaster County owned by a distant cousin. Once he saw that my Mother had two days a week off, plus three months during his busiest season and was actually putting money in the bank, he decided that he too could become a teacher. My parents had met when they both were attending Pennsylvania State University and they both had graduated, so they just needed to take some education courses to qualify to teach. Both went on to get their Master’s Degree, my Father from Colby College in Waterville, Maine. This meant we spent two summers staying at a cottage on Salmon Pond, one of the Belgrade Lakes while he was studying.

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The author watching a seaplane land on Salmon Pond, Maine

Full of confidence my Father told my sister and I that if he didn’t get a grant to study the third summer at Colby, he would take us to the World’s Fair in Seattle. Our wishes came true, his didn’t. We ended up on a two month camping trip that took us across the United States and back through Canada along the newly opened Trans-Canada Highway. We visited many of our National Parks, hiked many trails. encountered bears friendly and otherwise, and truly had an experience of a life time. The trip included my first visit to San Francisco.

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Yes, that is the author looking out the window of a cable car in 1962.

Summers always meant getting away even when I was very young. There were two places that really made it seem summer. My Grandparents rented a place on the New Jersey shore near Altantic City. The grandchildren got to spend time there with and without parents, which gave everyone a break.

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My Father, me, my sister, Marie and my Mother.

The cottage sat on cinder blocks and was just a short walk to the beach. This was pre – Atlantic City Casinos. Now you can’t even see the ocean from the street because it is solid condos.

The other place that I can remember where we had countless hours of fun and excitement was my Grandfather’s sister’s, my great Aunt Libby, and her husband’s, my great Uncle John place in Maine. During the winter they lived near my Grandparents in Pennsylvania, but come May they were on their way to their place in Maine on Cosco Bay. The lawn stretched out to the rugged coastline and at low tide you could walk among the rocks and see various tidal pools with starfish, urchins, other living things.

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My great Uncle John Salom

The highlight of any visit to Aunt Libby’s was the day Uncle John would meet the lobstermen coming into dock and getting fresh lobster to take home and cook. They were so good.

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On the croquet field in our front yard my older brothers and sister wait for me to hit.

When I was in seventh and eight grade the first day of school meant getting up and walking across the street. There was no sleeping in though because my parents made sure we had breakfast with them before they left to teach in a neighboring school district. When I got to 9th grade I went with them because there was no chance I would get my Father as a teacher since he taught 8th grade. My oldest brother had had my father as a teacher the first year he taught science. My brother needed the course and my father was the only teacher, the district was so small.

When I was old enough to get a driver’s license my parents bought me a car so that I could drive to school.

It has been forty years since my last day back to school for my senior year of high school. I’ve done a lot of maturing in those years and I wouldn’t trade places with the kids today facing that unknown future.

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BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Bill Wilson is a veteran freelance photographer whose work is published by San Francisco and East Bay media. Bill embraced photography at the age of eight. In recent years, his photos capture historic record of the San Francisco LGBT community in the Bay Area Reporter (BAR). Bill has contributed to the Sentinel for the past three years.

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STREET VIOLENCE: Broad daylight shooting victim dies

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A 23-year-old man who was shot in broad daylight in San Francisco Monday afternoon died after he was transported to San Francisco General Hospital, according to the San Francisco Police Department.

The victim was shot in the back at around 2:30 p.m. at Brookdale Avenue and Santos Street, police said.

No other information was immediately available.

Bay City News

See Related: STREET VIOLENCE

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SWEENEY TODD OPENS A.C.T.’s 41st SEASON – David Hess and Judy Kaye star in Stephen Sondheim’s musical adaptation of “The Demon Barber of Fleet Street”

David Hess and Judy Kaye star in Stephen Sondheim’s musical adaptation of “The Demon Barber of Fleet Street”

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By Seán Martinfield
Sentinel Fine Arts Critic
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

Director and designer John Doyle’s Tony Award–winning re-imagining of Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street opens tonight at American Conservatory Theater (A.C.T.). As the opener of its 41st season, SWEENEY TODD is likewise the West Coast premiere of the production that garnered Tonys for Doyle (Best Direction Of A Musical) and for music supervisor Sarah Travis (Best Orchestrations). David Hess (as “Sweeney Todd”) and Judy Kaye (as “Mrs. Lovett”) will be joined by many members of the Tony Award–winning Broadway cast.

SWEENEY TODD tells the tale of a master barber whom a corrupt judge has unjustly exiled to Australia. Sweeney returns to London with vengeance on his mind and a well-honed razor in his hands. Doyle’s production, in an exclusive engagement at A.C.T. before it embarks on a national tour, features a multitalented cast of actors playing their own musical instruments. Of this production, Sondheim says it comes closest to his original intention – a vision of “Grand Guignol”, a French term for a Punch and Judy show and, specifically, one that emphasizes the macabre.

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JUDY KAYE (Mrs. Lovett) and DAVID HESS (Sweeney Todd)

For the A.C.T. run, Broadway performer Judy Kaye will be playing “Mrs. Lovett” – while balancing a tuba and beating percussion. Kaye’s other Broadway credits include Phantom of the Opera, Mamma Mia!, On the Twentieth Century, Ragtime, and Souvenir, A Fantasia on the Life of Florence Foster Jenkins. David Hess has appeared off Broadway in Lincoln Center’s Dessa Rose, Prodigal, Love in a Thirsty Land, and the first national tour of Ragtime.

Re-creating their Broadway roles are Benjamin Magnuson (“Anthony Hope”), Lauren Molina (“Johanna”), John Arbo (“Jonas Fogg”), and Diana DiMarzio (“the Beggar Woman”). Former “standbys” in the New York production and now fully signed-on for the San Francisco run are Benjamin Eakeley (“Beadle”), Edmund Bagnell (“Tobias”), and Keith Buterbaugh (“Judge Turpin”).

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BENJAMIN MAGNUSON (Anthony) and LAUREN MOLINA (Johanna)

The design team for this production of SWEENEY TODD includes 2006 Drama Desk Award–winning lighting designer Richard G. Jones, veteran Broadway sound designer Dan Moses Schreier, Tony Award–winning wig and hair designer Paul Huntley (The Producers, Hairspray, The Pajama Game), and makeup designer Angelina Avallone (Sweet Charity, The Light in the Piazza, and The Pillowman).

Composer and lyricist Stephen Sondheim’s amazing list of credits include: A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, Anyone Can Whistle, Company, Follies, A Little Night Music, Sunday in the Park with George, Into the Woods, Assassins, Passion, Moving On, and Bounce.

To purchase tickets on-line: SWEENEY TODD

On Thursday night, September 6th, at 8:00 PM, A.C.T. offers another BRING WHAT YOU CAN / PAY WHAT YOU WISH. Patrons will be allowed to pay any amount for tickets when they donate children’s books, diapers, or coffee beans to benefit RAPHAEL HOUSE, a shelter and support program for homeless families in San Francisco’s Tenderloin District. Call 415-749-2228 for details. Patrons are limited to one ticket per donated item, two tickets per show per person. Tickets go on sale at 6 p.m. the day of the performance.

On September 29th, from 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM, A.C.T. presents an in-depth course: The Life and Music of Stephen Sondheim. Space is limited. The course fee, $180, includes one orchestra ticket to the September 29 matinee performance. For more information, call 415-439-2350.

See Seán’s articles and interviews:
FREE SHAKESPEARE IN THE PARK – Your Midsummer Night’s Dream begins Saturday
SOPRANO RENÉE FLEMING FEATURED GUEST STAR AT SYMPHONY OPENING, SEPTEMBER 19th
THE SCULPTURE OF LOUISE NEVELSON: Constructing a Legend
FREE TICKETS TO “SAMSON AND DELILAH” AT AT&T PARK, SEPTEMBER 28TH
GREATER TUNA – Returns To San Francisco
A CONVERSATION WITH JIM BROCHU AND STEVE SCHALCHLIN – The New Conservatory Theatre extends “The Big Voice: God or Merman?” until August 26th
HOTEL CASABLANCA – World Premiere in San Francisco
INSIGNIFICANT OTHERS – A Conversation with Composer Jay Kuo
IPHIGÉNIE EN TAURIDE – Everything old is new again at SF Opera
An Interview with PASCAL MOLAT, Principal Dancer of the San Francisco Ballet

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Seán Martinfield is a native San Franciscan. He is a Theatre Arts Graduate from San Francisco State University, a professional singer, and well-known private vocal coach to Bay Area actors and singers of all ages and persuasions. His clients have appeared in Broadway National Tours including Wicked, Aïda, Miss Saigon, Rent, Bye Bye Birdie, in theatres and cabarets throughout the Bay Area, and are regularly featured in major City events including Diva Fest, Gay Pride, and Halloween In The Castro. As an Internet consultant in vocal development and audition preparation he has published thousands of responses to those seeking his advice concerning singing techniques, professional and academic auditions, and careers in the Performing Arts. Mr. Martinfield’s Broadway clients have all profited from his vocal methodology, “The Belter’s Method”, which is being prepared for publication. If you want answers about your vocal technique, post him a question on AllExperts.com. If you would like to build up your vocal performance chops and participate in the Bay Area’s rich theatrical scene, e-mail him at: sean.martinfield@gmail.com.

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BAY BRIDGE OPEN – Smooth sailing Tuesday morning

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It’s smooth sailing for commuters on the Bay Bridge this morning following a marathon construction project that began Friday night and was completed 11 hours earlier than expected Monday evening.

“So far so good,” California Highway Patrol Officer Tracy Hoover said this morning. “It’s a normal commute.”

Crews worked tirelessly since about 8:40 p.m. Friday night to replace a 350-foot, 6,500-ton section of the bridge just east of the Yerba Buena tunnel.

The bridge was originally set to reopen 5 a.m. Tuesday, according to Caltrans spokesman Bart Ney, however, the new project went ahead of schedule.

The new section of the westbound viaduct is part of a seismic retrofit.

The placement of the enormous section of the bridge went very well, Ney said, especially considering that it was the “riskiest part of the operation.”

Caltrans scheduled five hours to move the new section into place, but it only took a little over two hours.

The bridge was reopened at 5:57 p.m. Monday.

Bay City News

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HUMAN-ANIMAL EMBRYO CREATION APPROVAL EXPECTED IN BRITAIN

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PUBLIC VIEWS ON HYBRID EMBRYOS

Plans to allow British scientists to create human-animal embryos are expected to be approved Wednesday by the government’s fertility regulator.

The Human Fertilization and Embryology Authority (HFEA) published its long-awaited public consultation on the controversial research Monday, revealing that a majority of people were “at ease” with scientists creating the hybrid embryos.

Researchers want to create hybrid embryos by merging human cells with animal eggs, in the hope they will be able to extract valuable embryonic stem cells from them.

The cells form the basic building blocks of the body and are expected to pave the way for revolutionary therapies for diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and even spinal cord injuries.

The consultation papers were released ahead of the authority’s final decision on the matter, which will mark the end of almost a year of intense lobbying by scientists and a fervent campaign by organizations opposed to research involving embryonic stem cells.

Using animal eggs will allow researchers to push ahead unhindered by the shortage of human eggs. Under existing laws, the embryos must be destroyed after 14 days when they are no bigger than a pinhead, and cannot be implanted into the womb.

Opponents of the research and some religious groups say the work blurs the distinction between humans and animals, and creates embryos that are destined to be destroyed when stem cells are extracted from them.

Two research groups based at King’s College London and Newcastle University have already applied to the HFEA to create animal-human embryos, but their applications have been on hold since November last year amid confusion over whether the authority was legally able to issue licences.

If the authority approves the research, the applications will go forward to a committee, with a decision on both due within three months.

Professor Ian Wilmut, whose team cloned Dolly the sheep, is waiting for the HFEA’s decision before applying to create hybrid embryos to study motor neurone disease with Professor Chris Shaw at the Institute of Psychiatry in London.

The consultation, a $300,000 three-month mix of opinion polls, public meetings and debates, found participants were initially cautious of merging animal and human material, but became more positive.

“When further factual information was provided and further discussion took place, the majority of participants became more at ease with the idea,” the HFEA’s report says.

Most support was expressed for the creation of so-called cytoplasmic hybrid embryos, in which a human cell is inserted into an empty animal egg.

Other hybrid embryos, such as those created by fertilising an animal egg with human sperm, or vice versa, were less well supported.

In December, the government sparked a revolt by scientists, patient groups and medical researchers when it published a white paper containing proposals to outlaw almost all research into animal-human embryos.

The research has since been backed by Nobel prizewinners, the Medical Research Council, the Wellcome Trust, the House of Commons Science and Technology Committee, and the British government’s chief science adviser, Sir David King.

In May, the government withdrew its opposition in a draft fertility bill and now seeks to outlaw only embryos created by mixing sperm and eggs from humans and animals.

The bill will be put before parliament before the end of the year.

Martin Rees, president of the Royal Society, said: “The HFEA’s consultation reveals welcome recognition of the potential of this research, [with] 61% of the general public agreeing with the creation of human-animal embryos, if it may help understand diseases, with only a quarter opposed to this research.”

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STREET VIOLENCE: Three more slain since Sunday

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Police are investigating three separate homicides in San Francisco that have occurred since Sunday morning, officials said today.

Byron Smith, a 32-year-old San Francisco resident, was found fatally shot in the 100 block of Velasco Avenue around 9:40 a.m. Sunday, according to officials.

Officers reportedly discovered John Daniel Schirra, 22, dead on a street in the 2600 block of San Jose Avenue around 3:42 a.m. today. Officers are investigating the incident as a homicide.

Police responded to reports of shots fired in the 6600 block of Third Street around 2:30 a.m. Sunday, according to officials. Dejohn Maybon, 35, was pronounced dead at the scene, police said.

No arrests have been made in any of the cases and the homicides appear to be unrelated, officials said.

Bay City News

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TRAVELING TO VENICE – A City in its Glory

Serenissima Repubblica di Venezia

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Disembarking at dock of the Giardini for the Venice Biennale. 6.7.07. Photo: JH.

BY DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA

We were in Venice a couple of weeks ago, as regular NYSD readers know; ostensibly to cover the Venetian Heritage’s biennale. In its eight years of activity, Venetian Heritage has funded a number of restoration projects both in Venice and in Croatia — which was once part of the Serenissima as Venice was known when it was The Most Serene Republic of Venice (Serenissima Repubblica di Venezia).

The biennale is an opportunity for VH supporters to see, to consider and to appreciate the organization’s work. It is also another opportunity to experience the pleasure of being present in Venice. It is an extraordinary trip and we were very fortunate to be invited along to see and to learn and to enjoy (a tiny word for such an enormous experience).

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Hotel Europa

That week was also the time of the 52nd Venice Biennale, considered by some to be the most venerable of all the international art shows. This event drew thousands of people from from all over the globe – dealers, collectors, art historians, artists, fans, art lovers, people in the art business and art groupies. And so there was an ongoing excitement in the air. For a moment there it seemed as if all of Venice was enveloped in the Biennale We were staying in the Europa, just across the Grand Canal from the Peggy Guggenheim Museum where there were mobs of visitors attending dinners and cocktail receptions every night.

Farther down the Canal, at the Palazzo Grassi, the last great palace built at the end of the 18th century before Napoleon invaded, there was featuring an exhibition of works from the collection of French business tycoon Francois Pinault and it was a hub of social activity every night also.

The Grassi family sold the palazzo in 1840 after financial reversals. Today it is a cultural center, art gallery and museum. The interior courtyard has a 600 seat theater. Two years ago M. Pinault acquired controlling interest in the palazzo from FIAT, and now displays numerous works from his extensive art collection. On the landing on the canal was Subodh Gupta’s gigantic sulpture Very Hungry God (2006), reminding this traveler of the now famous Damien Hirst $100 million head.

The art world is not dissimilar to the world of Hollywood (in the universal sense), from my vantage point; or the business world, in that it traffics in Ego which often substitutes for a lot of other attributes that may not be readily available. It is a world about money, maybe now more than ever, and all kinds of notions of stardom — from the collector, to the curator, to the museum head, to the critic and to, last, but not least of course, the artist. It is a world of swiftly changing tastes coming together with venality and occasionally genius. You can sometimes get the impression that the artist is only there to provide fodder (and methods of exchange) for the aforementioned players whose own self-importance is never far from view.

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Thomas Krens arrives at the Guggenheim.

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Anyway, all of that energy was present in Venice on this particular week and it made for a lot of excitement, not unlike, ironically, the kind of excitement people get from the energy of New York. One night we were at the Peggy Guggenheim when Thomas Krens, the director of the Guggenheim in New York arrived, solo, by boat. The deck was briefly cleared for His Directorship and just off the dock, on the steps, the crowd was watching. Mr. Krens is one of a cadre of Ivy League educated art historians who have risen to top directorships of museums in America. Importance disembarking. These boys (mainly boys, not girls) have had a very influential hand in making museums (and contemporary art) the hot ticket that it is today.

One late morning we went over to the Giardini, a part of the island where the Biennale was set up. The director of the Biennale is Robert Storr, an American curator, critic, teacher and current dean of the Yale School of Art. The Giardini is a neighborhood in Venice that has some parkland to it. The exhibitions were divided between the Giardini (park/garden) and the Arsenale which once upon a time was the facility of the Venetian navy.

We went first to the Arsenale which is a quarter mile long brick warehouse-like structure with ceilings more than 20 feet high. The exhibitions included sculpture, videos, paintings, drawings and scenes. There was a video of a little boy in a desolate bombed-out looking neighborhood playing kickball with a human skull. The exhibition space of the Arsenale allowed a great many pieces to be displayed with very little limitation. The boy kicking the skull around stayed with me for the entire visit (and thereafter). It seemed to articulate much of what I saw and felt.

I am not an art historian or curator. My knowledge of art and art history is: lacking. So my approach is entirely based on my reaction, often emotional, to what I am seeing. Being there at this most beautifully strange planet called Venice, on the dancing greenish-turquoise Adriatic waters, amidst the trove ancient riches and luxuries, art and architecture, amidst its 21st century inhabitants and armies of tourists, and seeing a grainy video (in color) of a little boy kicking a dirtied skull around as if it were a soccer ball, was very provocative. As well as portentous. I liked being at the Biennale and in Venice. Now, and Then; it was all there for the seeing.

Afterwards in the Giardini, in the British pavilion there was an exhibition of works by a highly popular artist named Tracey Emin. Ms. Emin’s pictures are almost entirely of bodies, limbs, positioned in such a way as to focus on genitalia. “It’s all about private parts,” I said to JH. “Yes,” he replied, “and they’re not private anymore.”

Yes. They are not.

At the waterfront entrance to the Biennale, there was a sign: ‘the biennale has no position on conflict and no part in it’

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The walk through town to the Arsenale.

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Approaching the Arsenale…

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…and entering.

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Above: Mother Nature’s creations.

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Performance art, outdoors.

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Tracey Emin at the British pavilion.

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DPC interacts with Felix Gonzalez-Torres at the U.S. pavilion

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Passing by the U.S. pavilion.

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Mary Hilliard

Leaving the exhibition we caught a waterbus back to St. Mark’s Square where the day had begun. Footsteps, laughter, voices, cathedral bells clanging out at every half hour. The musicians on the piazza beginning to warm up. And the pigeons, very aggressive, unconcerned about our presence which is often in their way.

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St. Mark’s Square.

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A true Venetian.

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A water taxi driver in the rear view mirror.

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An evening ride.

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The new Church of San Zaccaria, facade restored by Venetian Heritage and Stichting Nederlands Venetië Comite; the square across from the church.

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Later we took a ride on the gondola. I had no real desire except someone said “you must!” And so we did. Down along the narrow canals. We learned from our cell-toting gondolier that the real estate prices had been driven up so high that most Venice natives can afford to live there anymore. A floor of a house can cost a million euros and of course are occupied for only a small part of the year by their owners.

The gondolier also told us that the speedboats own the canals now and are shown special privilege by the carbinieri who tend to be overly strict with the gondoliers.

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Street performers and our gondolier at work.

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A rare look up.

New York Social Diary

See Related: TOUR DE FORKS – What could be better than dining in Italy

See Related: DINING

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IRAN DEFIANT on nuclear weapons

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President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad

Iran’s leaders issued dual, defiant statements on Sunday, with the president announcing that the nation had 3,000 active centrifuges to enrich uranium and the top ayatollah appointing a new Islamic Revolutionary Guards commander who once advocated military force against students.

The pairing of the messages, just days after the United Nations’ top nuclear official said Iran was striking conciliatory poses, appeared intended to reaffirm the country’s refusal to back down to pressure from the United States over its nuclear program and its role in Iraq, political analysts in Iran said. And it came as the Bush administration was celebrating progress in its talks with North Korea to shut down that country’s nuclear programs.

Indeed, the timing and tone of Iran’s declarations may be more politically significant than their content, particularly in the case of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s announcement that Iran had finally reached its stated goal of developing 3,000 centrifuges.

Many technical experts have expressed skepticism over Iran’s periodic claims of enrichment breakthroughs, saying the assertions often turn out to be exaggerated.

That seemed to be the case again on Sunday, though nuclear experts said that even if Ahmadinejad was overreaching, it would be only a matter of time before the boast became true. The most recent report of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), released Thursday, said Iran had 1,968 centrifuges enriching uranium at its main Natanz plant, 328 in testing, and 328 in assembly – for a total of 2,624. The report noted that the assessment was accurate as of Aug. 19, or two weeks ago.

The goal of 3,000 centrifuges is significant to nuclear experts: they say that if Iran could spin that many centrifuges nonstop for a year, it could make enough highly enriched uranium for a single atom bomb.

Mohamed ElBaradei, the atomic energy agency director general, said in an interview last week that Iran seemed to be intentionally slowing its progress in an effort to strike a conciliatory note as the United Nations Security Council demanded it stop the nuclear work completely. “My gut feeling,” he said, “is that it’s primarily for political reasons.”

Still, Ahmadinejad’s new claim was a direct challenge to that notion, and to efforts by the United States and European countries to impose harsher sanctions against Iran. “The West thought the Iranian nation would give in after just a resolution, but now we have taken another step in the nuclear progress and launched more than 3,000 centrifuge machines, installing a new cascade every week,” state television quoted the president as saying.

The White House warned that a new round of sanctions was likely in the wake of Iran’s refusal to cooperate. “This kind of announcement is inconsistent with Iran’s recent comments on cooperation with the I.A.E.A.,” said a spokesman, Robert W. Saliterman.

The coinciding message about the change at the top of the Revolutionary Guards, made by the country’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, had distinct ramifications for the United States as well.

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Ayatollah Ali Khamenei

There have been reports that the Bush administration is considering declaring the Revolutionary Guards a terrorist organization, opening the way to further economic sanctions against Iran because the Guards are involved in nearly every aspect of the state-controlled economy. (Last week, a senior administration official involved in the internal debate said the designation may instead be limited to the Quds Force, which the United States accuses of being particularly active in Iraq.)

The Revolutionary Guards are also believed to be deeply involved in the country’s nuclear program, and any action against it or the Quds Force is perceived in Washington as a way of stepping up pressure on Iran’s nuclear aspirations as well.

Iran still rejects Western accusations that it is seeking nuclear weapons, insisting that its program is solely for peaceful purposes. And it has reached agreement with the atomic energy agency finally to answer questions about many years of past nuclear activities that have fueled suspicions that it has been secretly trying to develop a weapons program.

But that agreement was dismissed by the United States as a half step that ignored Washington and Europe’s primary demand: that Iran stop enrichment.

Iran’s statements, in addition to ratcheting up defiance of international pressure, had distinct domestic political overtones as well, analysts said. “He has to feed his domestic clientele,” one European diplomat who works with the atomic agency said Sunday.

In Tehran, Saeed Leylaz, a political analyst and former government official, said, “What is important is the spirit that dominates the system, and that has not changed.”

The news of the change at the top of the Revolutionary Guards, in particular, was greeted with surprise and keen interest by Iranians.

Ayatollah Khamenei announced that Gen. Yahya Rahim Safavi, who had led the force for a decade, would be replaced by Brig. Gen. Mohammad Ali Jafari.

The Guards, which has about 200,000 members, controls a huge empire that has a stake in every significant corner of Iran’s economy and its civil system of governance. Ahmadinejad was a member of the Guards during the 1980 to 1988 war with Iraq, and he has placed dozens of former members in leadership positions around the country and in the central government in Tehran.

The Guards are, by design, the most economic and politically independent body in the country, outside of the supreme leader’s office. General Jafari has an established record of support for the theocratic system of government, and its hard-line policies.

In 1999, he showed a willingness to use the guard’s military force to quell student riots. In a letter to Mohammad Khatami, then the president, he wrote, “We have reached the end of our rope and can no longer tolerate it if the situation is not confronted.”

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A DAY TO REMEMBER – 40 years later

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When it is all said and done — the music remains as the driving force that gets people together ROCK AND ROLL!!!!!
PHOTOS BY ROSHANI DHUNGANA

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A vintage bus from the sixies attracted quite a bit of interest from those attending Sunday’s festival in Golden Gate Park. There were quite a few more cars 40 years later and festvival goers parked as far away as the beach and walked the two miles to the concert area. Some were using canes.

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Never a short supply of these
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It was a glorious day in the park and the majesty of the moment was accentuated by the colors that surrounded the festival

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One of the original originals Wavy Gravy made a raspy appearance

See Related: SUMMER OF LOVE 40TH ANNIVERSARY – A Sunday happening in San Francisco Golden Gate Park – Don the flowers again and relight that thing

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DAVID TOERGE
Sentinel Photography Editor
When David Toerge left a career in photojournalism that had spanned over twelve years and started in a new direction of commercial photography he blended the editorial style with a more corporate look. David led the way in that new style garnering many awards for his work. Communications Arts has honored him over six times. Based in San Francisco, David shoots projects on location all over the US for various corporations and a multitude of magazines and always brings back great images. He has a keen sense of light, color, and composition and delivers to his clients assignments done with passion. He has climbed bridges hundreds of feet in the air, shot in caves hundreds of feet below, dived with sharks and driven the track with Indy drivers. He has shot earthquakes and firestorms but loves walking the streets with his camera just photographing the everyday life of his city.


Thank you to Roshani Dhungana for suppling the Sentinel all of the above photos. We are please and honored to have her as a contributing photographer to the Sentinel — DT.

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THE LOVE FOR CAPITAL – The Witch of Wall Street

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The press called her “The Witch of Wall Street.”

The basis for the name was her irascibility and her personal hygiene.

She stunk.

In summertime the odor would be so foul that people working in the same bank office where she kept a desk would scheme to stay as far away from her as possible. Her long black dresses, decades out of style, would turn green and ragged from wear and filth. Her fingernails were crusty dirty.

She went around for 20 years beleaguered by a painful hernia before she finally had to see the doctor. She was outraged by his fee for surgery ($150 – this was a century ago), but so desperate that she agreed. And later she tried to stiff the doctor, as was her wont whenever it came to paying for anybody’s services.

She was known as “the richest woman in America” or “the richest woman in the world.” Therein lay the real reason a lot of men thought she was a witch. She’d inherited almost $7 million from her father and her aunt in 1865. That was a great fortune, comparable to a hundred million in the buying power of today’s currency (there was little or no inflation, save for the time of the Civil War, from 1800 to 1929). Between the ages of 31, when she inherited, and fifty years later, when she died, she single-handedly (and really single-handedly because she trusted no one with her money) turned that into almost $200 million (or approximately $17 billion in today’s currency).

She was born Henrietta Howland Robinson in New Bedford, Massachusetts, on November 21, 1834, at the dawn of the Victorian age. Both her mother and father came from old, established Colonial families. Hetty’s great-grandfather went to sea at an early age, got in at the start of the American whaling industry, and eventually owned the country’s greatest whaling fleet. Her father, Edward Robinson, who joined the family whaling-ship business, was strictly interesting making money. Hetty once told a reporter, “My father told me never to give anyone anything, not even a kindness.” (ed.’s note: Doris Duke’s father James B. Duke was more humanitarian on his advice to his daughter and only child – he told her simply never to trust anybody.) With a father like Hetty’s it is no wonder that her mother often sought warmth and refuge in her sister Sylvia’s house. Edward Robinson, however, increased the family inheritance 20 times over.

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Hetty Green’s residence between
1900 and 1910, in Bellows Falls, Vermont.

In her youth, Hetty had been sent to a boarding school, but only briefly. She had little interest in any of it. She preferred being at her father’s side as he conducted his daily business in New Bedford. After dinner, the girl would spend her hours reading the financial pages from the New York and Boston papers.

She had been a goodlooking young woman. By 20, attempts were made to present her to society both in Boston and New York. Her father gave her a wardrobe worth $1200 (in the tens of thousands in today’s currency), but she sold the clothes and invested the money in the stock market. She relied on an unwitting cousin she was staying with in New York to buy her what she needed.

When she was 25, her long-suffering mother died. Her mother’s estate went to her father with none to her. Hetty wanted to contest the will but was afraid that confronting her father might jeopardize her future interest in his estate. The dilemma was compounded by father’s expressed desire – now freed from marriage and still handsome, virile and rich in his late 50s – to change his life. He sold his interests in the family firm and moved to New York where he joined a new shipping partnership. At the end of the Civil War, with prices inflating vigorously, Edward Robinson sold his share of the partnership for almost $5 million.

Hetty followed her father to New York, concerned that he might remarry and start another family, which could seriously alter her future inheritance. Coincidentally, her maiden aunt Sylvia Howland, the richest lady in New Bedford, was talking about re-doing her will and leaving the bulk of her estate to friends, relatives, and charity, and not to Hetty. Alarmed at the prospect, Hetty went to work on auntie, extracting her promise that she would never, ever, change her will (leaving everything to Hetty). Aunt Sylvia died two years late, however, and Hetty soon learned that Sylvia had indeed changed her will, seriously diminishing Hetty’s share of the $2 million estate. Coincidentally that same year Hetty’s father also died, leaving her $1 million outright and the income from a $5 million trust. She was 31 years old.

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Hetty Green’s fortune had its genesis in her great-grandfather’s whaling ships.

Despite her ample inheritance from her father, Hetty was outraged by Aunt Sylvia’s new will. She felt she should have been its absolute heiress and went to court over it. The courts turned down her claim. She sued, presenting an “earlier” will that turned out to be a forgery. The battle brought Hetty Green her first public (and unfavorable) exposure and was reported on in the press all over the country.

Not long before her father died, Hetty became engaged to a man 14 years her senior named Edward Green, an affable businessman from Bellows Falls, Vermont, who’d made his money in the Philippine silk trade. In 1867, two years after the death of her father, and during her fight for her aunt’s estate, Hetty married Green.

After it was proven that she had indeed forged Sylvia’s “earlier” will, the Greens fled to London to avoid the law. There she gave birth to her first child, a son named Edward Howland Robinson Green, later known as Ned, or The Colonel. Three years later in 1870,she gave birth to a daughter named Hetty Sylvia Ann Howland Robinson Green, known forever after as Sylvia.

The Greens, who’d signed a pre-nuptial agreement at Hetty’s insistence, keeping their fortunes strictly separate, lived very fashionably in London, spending, of course, only his money. In 1875, however, thinking the statute of limitations had run out on her potential will-forging charges, the family returned to Bellows Falls.

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Hetty Green’s son, Col. Green, as he was known, brought the first gasoline-powered car to Dallas (shown here with his driver Jesse Illingsworth). It was a 1899 model St. Louis, manufactured by George P. Dorris who brought it to Dallas. After his mother’s death, Ned Green lived in royal style. His summer place in Massachusetts had a staff of 107 on the payroll, not including his valet, a half-dozen “private secretaries,” a masseuse and a personal maid for his wife Mabel.

It was back in Vermont that Hetty soon began to show signs of self-neglect: the dirty hands and fingernails, clothes rarely cleaned and worn long after they’d begun to fall apart. And her penury: her children went to school in cast-offs. In wintertime, she lined her son’s jackets and shoes with paper. Her annual income was already in the mid-six figures (in the millions in today’s currency), yet she fought with everyone over money and how much she had to pay. Local shopkeepers dreaded her dirty hands on a piece of merchandise. Most damning perhaps was her meanness with her son. Ned had injured a knee in a sledding accident when he was nine years old. Hetty refused to get him medical attention because of the potential cost. The boy grew up lame until, in his teens, the leg became gangrenous and had to be amputated above the knee.

The return to the United States saw the beginning of Hetty’s great financial success. Still living in Bellows Falls, she’d take the train to New York – most times for just a day (a six hour ride each way), where she had great success as an operator on the Stock Exchange. Wall Street watched in astonished amazement as the rumpled and dirty little woman took large positions in the highly unregulated stock market, particularly in certain railroads (the hot stocks of the era), and made money almost every time. No woman had ever done this.

By 1881, Mr. Green, who was a speculator in the stock markets, had lost most of his $2 million fortune. That was it for him, as far as Hetty was concerned. She refused to assist in maintaining the household, and decided to move herself and her two children to New York where she could be closer to business.

The stock market had become only a minor interest in her financial affairs. Her main businesses were buying mortgages (she especially liked holding mortgages on churches and didn’t mind foreclosing when they couldn’t keep up their payments), and lending money to bankers and brokerage houses. Hetty was a woman a century ahead of her time. Today she would have been the hedge funds and private equity managers’ darling.

By that time in her career, she was regularly on the run from the tax collectors, for she also felt no obligation to give any of her money to the government. Her rooms in Hoboken protected her from the New York collectors and vice versa. For the next several years, mother and children lived in various cheap cold-water flats (hot water was an unnecessary luxury for people who didn’t wash anyway) and furnished rooms where their rents were never more than $22 a month.

The family was deprived of anything money could buy that would create comfort. When she went to the desk she kept in a Wall Street office, it was reported that she took her lunch – a can of oatmeal that she heated on a radiator in someone else’s office, and ate it dry. In a story in the New York Herald in 1888, it was reported that “Mrs. Green’s table expenses did not exceed $5 a week and her others were less than $4.”

By the 1890s, she was so famous by the that she was a household word across America, a synonym for “skinflint” or “miser.” The press followed her everywhere. The attention amused her; she liked it. “My life,” she said, “is written for me down in Wall Street by people who, I assume, do not care to know one iota of the real Hetty Green. I am in earnest; therefore they picture me as heartless. I go my own way. I take no partner, risk nobody else’s fortune, therefore I am Madame Ishmael, set against every man.”

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Hetty Green, her son-in-law Matthew Astor Wilks, and her daughter Sylvia Green Wilks on the Wedding Day in Morristown, New Jersey in 1909. Sylvia was 39 when she married Wilks, then 63. Hetty who was never fond of Wilks, calling him a “gouty old man,” nevertheless accepted him because he had his own money and agreed never to take any of Sylvia’s.

But gibes at Hetty were also an elaborate male deflection of the remarkable truth: when the Big Boys needed cash, and quick, Hetty Green was a major source who came to the rescue. By that time in her financial career, she had increased her fortune six or seven times. She kept $20 million to $40 million (think a half billion in today’s terms) in cash at all times for quick loans. More than once the City of New York called on her to keep the city solvent. Hetty Green was one of the lenders in J.P. Morgan’s emergency operation to save the banks during the Panic of 1907, writing out a check for $1.1 million (50 times that in today’s marketplace). For payment she took short-term revenue bonds.

Hetty kept her children close to the nest and demanded they practice the same frugality. Sylvia, however, brought out Hetty’s maternal instincts. It was for Sylvia that she left Hoboken for a few days in 1908, taking rooms in the newly opened Plaza Hotel, to give her daughter a dinner. She wanted Sylvia to find a husband, which she finally did, in Matthew Astor Wilks, a great-grandson of John Jacob Astor I. Wilks was at least 25 years older than his fiancée. Hetty gave her daughter a proper wedding, which took place the following year in Morristown, New Jersey.

When her son Ned came of age, he was sent to Fordham where he got a law degree. After the boy passed the bar, she sent him to Chicago to manage her real estate investments there. He was paid next to nothing so he too had to live in cheap flats and hotels. After he had passed his mother’s tests in Chicago, however, he was sent on to Texas to breathe new life into a railroad Hetty had bought for a song.

In Texas, Ned was successful, and it gave him an independence that his mother had to acknowledge. It also gave him access to large sums of cash that he spent on the good life. In Chicago he had met Mabel Harlow, a prostitute who was his first sexual experience. He moved Mabel to Texas and set himself up in hotel suites where she supplied the girls and Ned supplied the customers, the rooms, and the champagne.

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Colonel Green’s house in South Dartmouth, Mass.

Hetty was so worried about her son marrying and bringing someone into the family who might make a claim on her fortunate that she extracted from Ned a promise “not to marry.” So Mabel became Ned’s companion, his procurer, and remained with him for the rest of his life. Hetty tolerated this arrangement because in her mind it insured the agreement she had with her son.

Ned Green became his mother’s son, a master at protecting her assets. Recognizing this and now in her mid-sixties, Hetty brought him back to New York to oversee her financial affairs. She tolerated his extravagant lifestyle, which included a large suite at the Waldorf-Astoria (the original, built by the Astors, which stood at 34th Street and Fifth Avenue). Later Ned moved to two townhouses on West 91st Street and Central Park, where he and Mabel lived quietly and discreetly.

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Hetty Green and her beloved Curtis.

After his mother’s death, Ned would marry Mabel (with a pre-nup giving her $1500 a month for life). He spent his multimillion dollar annual income on luxurious estates in Florida, New York, and Massachusetts, and kept a coterie of “protégées” or “private secretaries” – pretty young teen-age girls who were given $100,000 trust funds and schooled to attend Wellesley (while visiting Ned and Mabel on weekends at the big house overlooking the water in Dartmouth, Massachusetts).

Hetty Green worked daily until her mid-70s, living in smaller lodgings after her children moved away. When she was 77, she contracted pneumonia. Papers all over the world reported that the Witch of Wall Street was near death. She fooled ‘em, however, and survived: the witch who would not die. However, she did move into her son’s second townhouse (and agreed to pay him what she’d paid for rent in the previous rooming house she’d lived in). The illness, however, left her noticeably weaker.

On July 3, 1916, just a few months short of her 82nd birthday, Hetty Green died in her son’s house on West 91 Street. Her estate was estimated to be close to $200 million at the time – or an estimated $17 billion in today’s dollars. (J.P. Morgan’s estate at the time of his death three years before was approximately $80 million.) She had spent her entire life in pursuit of money. She bought nothing for herself or her children. She gave nothing away. She just watched her fortune grow and grow at the expense of virtually everything else in her life except her beloved little dog Curtis, whose name she sometimes used on her front door to throw tax agents off her trail.

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988 Fifth, the last home (floors three and four) of Sylvia Green Wilks.

Her son Ned spent his inheritance extravagantly and made some generous contributions. His estate in Dartmouth, Massachusetts (house still standing on the promontory overlooking the sea) was used by MIT scientists for experiments including a prototype atom-smasher and his powerful radio transmitters, built by Dartmouth College and financed by him, were used in the late 1920s to keep in touch with explorer Richard E. Byrd’s Antarctic expedition.

Hetty’s daughter Sylvia Green Wilks lived in New York. Shortly after the death of her husband in 1926 (after fifteen years of marriage), she moved from her house at 440 Madison Avenue to 988 Fifth Avenue into two lower-floor apartments, using the third floor for her home and the fourth floor to store her excess furniture. When her brother “the Colonel” died in 1937, she inherited almost all of her brother’s estate. Reclusive and eccentric Sylvia Green Wilks died in 1951, leaving an estate of $90 million after taxes, almost all of it was distributed to schools, hospitals and charities. Hetty Green, the woman who loved money, had been avenged: her daughter gave it all away to strangers.

See Related: LABOR DAY – A NATION’S GREATEST ASSET IS THE SPIRIT OF ITS PEOPLE – San Francisco Mayor Proclaims in 1939 – Lewis Hine photojournalism stood against child labor

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SEPTEMBER 3 Videos of The Day – THE 1934 SAN FRANCISCO GENERAL STRIKE – HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN LABOR MOVEMENT – THE UNION MAKES US STRONG – Babies born today will not make friends quickly – Live radar and weather forecast

September 3 Videos of The Day
THE 1934 SAN FRANCISCO GENERAL STIKE

HISTORY OF THE AMERICAN LABOR MOVEMENT

THE UNION MAKES US STRONG

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SEPTEMBER 3 BIRTHDAY LORE
You are conservative in your judgment and your methods of execution. You have mechanical ability and are methodical, patient, observant, and versatile. You do not make friends or attachments hastily and will probably not marry young. Your love will be strong and lasting.

SEPTEMBER 3 ADVICE FOR THE DAY
Store spices and dried herbs away from the stove–they’ll lose flavor near heat and steam.

SEPTEMBER 3 WORD OF THE DAY
Dado. Definition: The lower portion of an interior wall when finished with wallpaper, paneling, or paint that contrasts with the upper portion of the same wall.

SEPTEMBER 3 IN HISTORY
Viking 2 landed on Mars, 1976. A hailstone measuring 17.5 inches in circumference and weighing 1.671 pounds was picked up and photographed in Coffeyville, Kansas, 1970.

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REALTIME SAN FRANCISCO WEATHER

Labor Day: Sunny, with a high near 73. West wind between 9 and 11 mph.

Monday Night: Mostly clear, with a low around 57. West wind between 7 and 11 mph.

Tuesday: Partly sunny, then gradually becoming sunny, with a high near 70. West wind between 7 and 14 mph.

Tuesday Night: Partly cloudy, with a low around 55. West wind between 11 and 14 mph becoming calm. Winds could gust as high as 18 mph.

Wednesday: Partly cloudy, with a high near 80.

Wednesday Night: Clear, with a low around 58.

Thursday: Sunny, with a high near 81.

Thursday Night: Partly cloudy, with a low around 58.

Friday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 78.

Friday Night: Clear, with a low around 58.

Saturday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 74.

Saturday Night: Mostly clear, with a low around 56.

Sunday: Mostly sunny, with a high near 72.

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MEXICO PRESIDENT BLASTS US IMMIGRATION POLICIES – ‘Mexico does not end at its borders’

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President Felipe Calderon blasted U.S. immigration policies on Sunday and promised to fight harder to protect the rights of Mexicans in the U.S., saying “Mexico does not end at its borders.”

The criticism earned Calderon a standing ovation during his first state-of-the nation address.

“We strongly protest the unilateral measures taken by the U.S. Congress and government that have only persecuted and exacerbated the mistreatment of Mexican undocumented workers,” he said. “The insensitivity toward those who support the U.S. economy and society has only served as an impetus to reinforce the battle … for their rights.”

He also reached out to the millions of Mexicans living in the United States, many illegally, saying: “Where there is a Mexican, there is Mexico.”

Since taking office in December, Calderon has maintained strong ties with the United States, but he has often denounced U.S. immigration policy, including more deportations that have divided many families, sometimes forcing U.S.-born children to build new lives in Mexico.

In one of the most high-profile cases, illegal immigrant Elvira Arellano was deported recently to Mexico after spending a year in a Chicago church to avoid being sent home. Her 8-year-old son Saul, who is a U.S. citizen, flew to Mexico on Friday to be reunited with his mother and said he plans to stay indefinitely, helping her fight to return to the United States.

Calderon addressed the nation Sunday from the National Palace, avoiding a showdown with leftist opposition lawmakers who had vowed to prevent him from making the speech in Congress, as Mexican tradition dictates.

Mexico’s Federal Electoral Tribunal declared Calderon the winner of the July 2006 race nearly a year ago, rejecting leftist candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador claims that Calderon’s narrow victory was fraudulent.

Calderon’s predecessor, Vicente Fox, was also blocked last year from making his state-of-the-nation address in Congress after leftist lawmakers stormed the stage and refused to give him passage. The lawmakers claimed Fox unfairly aided Calderon’s win, which Fox denied. Both are members of the conservative National Action Party.

Lopez Obrador refused to recognize Calderon’s eventual victory and declared himself leader of a parallel government. But he has largely disappeared from the public eye amid sharp divisions within his leftist Democratic Revolutionary Party.

Calderon, meanwhile, has garnered some of the highest approval ratings in Mexico’s history.

He said Sunday that Mexico has created 618,000 new jobs since January and needs to do more to close the giant gap between the rich and the poor. He also promised not to let up in his nationwide crackdown on drug gangs who control large swaths of Mexican territory.

“We can close our eyes to the reality, and because we are afraid or irresponsible, let organized crime take over our streets,” he said. “Or we can decide to fight and defeat crime with all the risks and costs that implies.”

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MOBILE EARTHQUAKE SIMULATOR coming to a street near you – See earthquake affect on home possessions

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Bay Area residents can get a taste of what an earthquake will do to their possessions when the Big Shaker hits town Sept. 6.

The Big Shaker, the world’s largest mobile earthquake simulator, is a 24-foot trailer that is furnished like an average living room, according to the American Red Cross Bay Area Chapter.

The trailer is part of the Prepare the Bay program, a joint effort between the American Red Cross Bay Area and QuakeHold! to help Bay Area residents plan for an earthquake.

The trailer is equipped with a hydraulic system that simulates varying degrees of earthquake intensity. Some of the faux furnishings are secured within the trailer, but others are not and viewers can see the affects that a quake would have on their home.

“We plan to take it all over the Bay Area to show people how to secure their furniture, appliances and other possessions so that their things won’t get broken or damaged beyond repair,” said QuakeHold! CEO Dean Reese in a statement.

Earthquake experts and emergency managers will be at the presentation to advise viewers on how to secure household items and answer other questions, according to the American Red Cross.

The presentation of the Big Shaker will start at 10 a.m. in the Lowe’s parking lot at 1340 El Camino Real.

Bay City News

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LABOR DAY – A NATION’S GREATEST ASSET IS THE SPIRIT OF ITS PEOPLE – San Francisco Mayor Proclaims in 1939 – Lewis Hine photojournalism stood against child labor

LEWIS HINE PHOTOJOURNALISM STOOD AGAINST CHILD LABOR

BY SAN FRANCISCO MAYOR ANGELO J. ROSSI
September 4, 1939
Labor Day Address to the American Federation of Labor
Treasure Island

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ANGELO J. ROSSI

I thank you not only as Angelo Rossi, the man, but more important than that, as Chief Executive of a truly great American city.

The greatest asset of any nation is the spirit of its people.

The greatest danger that menaces the security of any nation is the breakdown of that spirit.

There are those in our country who are fearful of the future.

They hear marching feet, rumbling guns and droning planes in other lands.

They hear the voices of discontent, spreading vicious doctrines which assail the fundamental principles upon which our nation is founded.

They hear great masses of our people crying for assistance and the opportunity to earn an honest dollar.

They hear all these things and they are fearful.

Their spirit is breaking.

Yet, on the other hand, I am privileged today to speak to a group of people whose presence here gives us cause for great confidence.

Here we have no evidence of a broken spirit.

Here we have a group of people who are imbued with the spirit which prompted our pioneer forefathers whose energies built this great Western Commonwealth.

Rather on this Labor Day we rejoice and are most hopeful for the future.

When tremendous groups of people meet for the purpose of doing honor to the high purpose or splendid achievements of some outstanding organization, they must be motivated by a great cause and imbued with a noble spirit.

The great outpouring of the citizenry, not only of the glorious city of San Francisco, but also of every city in this country bears testimony to the power, the strength and the accomplishments of the American Trades Union Movement.

The American Federation of Labor has earned and holds the sincere approval and respect of the American people.

So, as we meet on magic Treasure Island, created by the hands of labor, it is truly fitting that this day – Labor Day – has been dedicated to the loyalty, the energy, the ability, the skill and the spirit of all loyal Americans.

It seems commonplace to say we are living in the greatest land in the world.

Commonplace because we see about us war and the threat of war.

Because we see Labor and Capital alike drafted to destroy life.

Yes, we should give thanks to Almighty God that we are Americans. Pray God we may remain out of war. Pray God that all Americans back our President in his struggle to keep us out of war.

And you men and women of Labor celebrating today the rights given you by the Constitution; rights for which you have fought down through the years; rights which have made Labor today a strong and respected force in our national life – you men and women must be doubly proud that you are Americans.

As I have said, Labor holds a respected and powerful place in our national life.

Equally so does it hold that proud and respected place in San Francisco’s life.

We have struggled in the changing economic world, and we have been the crucible of experimentation in this direction.

But due to the Americanism and the conservatism of the majority of San Francisco labor leaders, we have gone forward hand in hand to a great destiny.

Gone forward hand in hand, despite the efforts of subversive influences, radical and un-American leaders, and outright communists.

I affirm – conservative Labor has been an impregnable wall against these influences and will continue to be.

Look at San Francisco’s record! Are we a dying city?

Listen to this! Among cities of comparable size, we enjoy the lowest tax rate in the nation.

Among cities of comparable size, San Francisco enjoys the highest credit rating in the nation.

Among cities of comparable size, San Francisco enjoys the smallest tax delinquency in the nation.

Of course, I do not propose to stand here and intimate that we are prosperous because we have a low tax rate.

Many do not pay taxes.

But we are prosperous because we have so arranged our finances as to pay our bills and give employment.

I am proud that I have been able to play a part in securing federal funds on frequent trips to Washington, to keep payrolls going in our communities.

I am proud, too, that with this low tax rate we nonetheless have given to our citizens those forms of municipal services which they have a right to expect and which, through the deepest depths of the depression, we have never curtailed.

We in America and the world have been going through the greatest economic change in the history of our country.

Yet, keeping pace with that change, conservative labor today is an energetic, well educated, far seeing and understanding group of people.

Conservative Labor’s representatives have sold the employer the story of Labor’s right to organize and bargain collectively for the benefit of the employee and the general public as well.

This is no longer a question in San Francisco.

San Franciscans understand conservative Labor’s position.

We are far more advanced than any city in the nation with respect to the relationship of employer and the employee.

I believe, and you men know, that Labor differences can be adjusted when both sides approach their problems with clean hands and in good faith.

Our experience has taught employer and employee alike that they ultimately sit down, talk things over, and arrive at a friendly solution.

We can prevent strikes and lockouts as well if we can be guided by experiences in the past.

And to conservative Labor I say – the welfare of the worker and not the personal ambitions of any leader should be the prime consideration in any discussion with employers.

Everyone agrees that a friendly solution of a problem is always the most lasting.

Any other type of adjustment which is the result of a strike or a lockout often leaves bitter feelings on one side or the other.

Always the possibility of new flare-up is in sight.

Stoppage of work just is another way of spelling “Economic Ruin” for employer and employee alike.

And, my friends, as experience has shown us, economic ruin for that great innocent third party – the General Public.

San Francisco lay in ruins in 1906; and what did we do?

We got together as one great family and rebuilded what is one of the most glorious cities in the world today.

We did it with unity of purpose.

We did it because we had a will to work together.

We did it because we were proud of our city.

An what we did for the city as a whole we can do again when differences of opinion between employer and employee crop up.

We should not need federal intervention to solve our family quarrels.

We should not need to bring someone fro the outside to tell one or the other of us which is wrong.

We should operate in our labor differences just as we operate in our own lives.

We have had troubles before.

We have gone through the mill.

We have adjusted our differences with our spirit unbroken.

For God’s sake, let us learn from the past.

Let us sit down in family conferences together rather than in bitterness and hate with its only reward – economic disaster, loss of payrolls, suffering of our women and children.

Let us therefore carry on in a “Live and Let Live” spirit, so that San Francisco may be the leader of the parade of all great American cities for better understanding and the fulfillment of a better life.

Again I thank the American Federation of Labor for its very kind and spontaneous invitation for me to speak today – the Federation which pioneered the labor movement and has always led in the fight for the rights of the worker.

Visit: The San Francisco Labor Council

See Related: THE LOVE FOR CAPITAL – The Witch of Wall Street

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PHILANTHROPY AND FUNDRAISING CHANGING through use of the internet

BY TONI GOODALE

Over the last decade, I have witnessed several changes in the fund-raising field. Some of these changes have been beneficial and, indeed, welcome developments. However, some of these new developments are arguably detrimental to successful fund-raising efforts. Let’s explore some of these.

There have been several noticeable changes in fund raising for major gifts, the large gifts that constitute the majority of dollars for any campaign. First, fund raising for major gifts have become a more time consuming process: today, major gifts have not decreased in size, but they might take three or four visits to successfully solicit. Greater time and effort are required to solicit major gifts because, in today’s competitive fund-raising environment, donors have more priorities. Over hundreds of thousands of non-profits now exist, most of whom are actively seeking funds. Moreover, even in some small communities, you will find as many as five major organizations doing campaigns at the same time.

In this highly competitive situation, major givers often spread their gifts around several organizations. In addition, many major gifts today include planned gifts which take a while to work out. Finally, fund raisers are more likely than before to wait for what they believe to be the donor’s optimum gift. Consequently, major gifts that in the past might have been solicited in one or two visits might take much longer today.

Another change has been an increase in the size of lead gifts in campaigns. More organizations are trying for lead gifts which are 20 percent rather than 10 percent of the campaign goal. Foundations and major donors are increasingly interested in big challenge grants at the start of a campaign, a development with which I do not necessarily agree. As a fund-raising strategy, I believe that, in most cases, challenge gifts are much more useful in the later stages of a campaign as a means of encouraging small gifts. I do not believe that major donors are particularly influenced by challenge gifts but, in some cases, Board members giving big lead gifts to challenge other Board members can be a useful strategy.

Also, deferred giving is becoming an increasingly important component of fund-raising campaigns. Development staff are becoming more sophisticated about approaching donors for both outright and planned gifts. Indeed, many development offices are creating separate planned gift staff positions. Planned giving programs are being started everywhere and these gifts are then often realized in capital campaigns. For many donors, planned giving represents not only a charitable means of giving, but also a growing component of their estate planning.

Finally, many campaigns are focusing more exclusively on major gift solicitations. Some universities are even limiting their campaigns to major gifts. These campaigns are easier to organize because they involve fewer prospects and, therefore, less staff support and fewer volunteers. Such campaigns, however, are missing involving smaller, sometimes younger donors who are the institution’s future. In addition, the excitement of the entire organization or community being involved in the campaign is often sacrificed.

New Developments in the Fund Raising Process

In addition to developments in major gift solicitation, I am also observing fundamental changes in the fund-raising process itself. In particular, an increasing tendency toward what is sometimes called “friend raising” rather than fund raising is worrisome. Several colleges are encouraging waiting before asking for gifts, sometimes for several years. In my opinion, cultivation of donors is critically important, but I think that extensive “friend raising” is often a way of avoiding actually raising money and letting solicitors off the hook. In other words, a form of procrastination rather than cultivation. Once a donor has received enough information about your organization, has met the key players and has visited the site, there is nothing wrong with putting the specific ask out on the table on certainly the second, if not the first visit, if you ask for the gift appropriately and diplomatically.

Another development that worries me is that staff members are spending too much time trying to figure out what donors want to give before they are visited. It’s always useful to have an idea about the donor’s special interests when you go in for a solicitation, but it can be a mistake to second guess any donor. The best thing to do in a visit is to discuss all the funding objectives in a campaign, show the donor the list of naming opportunities and make some suggestions. Then, it is important to listen to the donor describe his or her special interests and, to gear the ensuing conversation accordingly. One more new development in the fund-raising process is the phenomenon of ongoing capital campaigns.

Today, it seems as if every non-profit is constantly in a capital campaign. Several universities and large prep schools have formed Development Boards composed of top volunteers and donors who organize ongoing capital fund raising similar to ongoing annual fund raising. I believe that Development Boards are the wave of the future.

TONI GOODALE
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CONSULTANT’S CORNER
Mrs. Goodale is a veteran-pro fundraiser, having cut her teeth as an alumna of Smith College raising funds for alma mater. One thing led to another, interest led to progress; and more than three decades later Mrs. Goodale is one of the pre-eminent advisers in her field. In these columns which should run about twice a month, she shares the knowledge that experience has provided.

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GLOBAL WARMING threatens world’s great vineyards

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Rene Mure has seen grape harvesting move from October to August in less than ten years.

On a cobweb-encrusted rafter above his giant steel grape pressers, Rene Mure is charting one of the world’s most tangible barometers of global warming.

The evidence, scrawled in black ink, is the first day of the annual grape harvest for the past three decades. In 1978, it was Oct. 16. In 1998, the date was Sept. 14.

This year, harvesting started Aug. 24 – the earliest ever recorded, not only in Mure’s vineyards, but also in the entire Alsace wine district of northeastern France.

“I noticed the harvest was getting earlier before anybody had a name for it,” said 59-year-old Mure, the 11th generation of his family to produce wine from the clay and limestone slopes of the Vosges Mountains near the German border.

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“When I was young, we were harvesting in October with snow on the mountaintops.

“Today we’re harvesting in August.”

Throughout the wine-producing world, from France to South Africa to California, vintners are in the vanguard of confronting the impact of climate change. Rising temperatures are forcing unprecedented early harvests, changing the tastes of the best-known varieties of wine and threatening the survival of centuries-old wine-growing regions.

In the hot Mediterranean vineyards – the first to feel the effects of longer, drier summers – vintners are harvesting grapes at night to protect the fragile fruit at the critical picking stage. Growers in Spain, Italy and southern France are buying land at higher terrains for future vineyards.

Some champagne producers in northern France – whose grapes were ready for harvest in August, earlier than in any year on record – are eyeing properties in southern England, the current beneficiary of planet warming. The British wine industry is reemerging for the first time in the 500 years since a mini-ice age cooled Europe.

While Provence and other southern regions of France have suffered through debilitating droughts and high temperatures for several seasons, scientists and growers have been stunned by the dramatic evolutions in the northernmost regions of Alsace and Champagne, long considered less susceptible to global warming.

“Usually Alsace is one of the last regions to harvest in France, and this year we were the first ones,” said Gerard Boesch, president of the Alsace Wine Association. “That’s astonishing. Vintners wonder how all this will turn out in a few years.”

In a chain reaction of nature, climate change is also sending new insects and diseases north. The leafhopper is migrating north with warmer weather, spreading yellow leaf disease in Alsace vineyards for the first time, according to a regional research institute.

Scientists and vintners say wine grapes are the best agricultural measure of climate change because of their extraordinary sensitivity to weather and the meticulous data that have been kept concerning the long-lived vines.

“The link of wine to global warming is unique because the quality of wine is very dependent on the climate,” said Bernard Seguin, an authority on the impact of global warming and viniculture at the French National Agronomy Institute. “For me, it is the ultimate expression of the consequences of climate change.”

Nowhere is the impact more acute or better documented than in France. Here, the $13 billion wine industry is not only crucial to the economy but also more inextricably entwined in the culture and heritage of the people than in any wine-producing country on earth.

For centuries, the “vendange,” or annual grape harvest, has been treated as a near-religious ritual, with parish churches maintaining meticulous records in dusty, crumbling ledgers.

In France, wine growers are subject to the world’s most rigid cultivation restrictions: Vintners can grow only varieties authorized for their region, harvests are tightly regulated and, until this year, no irrigation was allowed. Year after year, the climate is the single greatest variable in France’s wine production, making its vineyards the perfect climate-change laboratory for scientists.

Rene Mure’s family has been growing grapes and producing wine in the hills surrounding the picturesque village of Rouffach since 1648. The family tree, with its 12 generations of wine growers – Rene’s children, Veronique, 31, and Thomas, 27, are the newest Mure vintners – is tacked to a wall in his cellars, which produce 350,000 bottles of wine a year.

The wines are aged in 100-year-old oak barrels personalized by Mure’s grandmother with the names of famous French women, including Marie Antoinette and Joan of Arc.

In 1932, his grandfather bought the 37.5-acre Domaine du Clos St. Landelin, named for the abbey whose monks tilled the vineyards in the 8th century. Its sunny, southern exposure on the steep mountain flanks made it one of the choicest vineyards in the area, and it produced the Mure family’s finest wines.

Mure and other French vintners have tasted global warming in their wines for the last three decades. They liked what they tasted. Their red pinot noirs were more aromatic, and their white Gewurztraminers were sweeter with fragrances of litchi and roses.

All over France, vintners abandoned their forefathers’ practice of adding sugar to the wines to improve their flavors and alcohol content. The sun and warmer summers were doing the job for them. Through the 1980s and 1990s, French wines won higher and higher ratings from domestic and international wine critics.

But the climate warming has accelerated faster than vintners or French scientists anticipated. That has forced sugar levels, and consequently alcohol levels, higher in the wines. Some producers in Provence are adding acidic compounds to their wines to keep them from becoming too sweet and undrinkable.

Vintners in Alsace are now facing similar problems. The average temperature in Alsace, which is bordered by the Rhine River and Germany,has risen 3.5 degrees in the last 30 years – a dramatic increase for sensitive grapevines, according to the French National Agronomy Institute.

“For 10 years, our problem has been to keep the acidity,” said Mure. “Wines need to be balanced to have fresh, crisp flavor.”

Mure has already started changing the way he cultivates his grapes, growing some vines closer to the ground with fewer leaves in the style of southern grape growers, giving his vines less exposure to the sun.

He wants to experiment with growing southern Syrah grapes in Alsace. The way Mure sees it, if the southern climate is moving north, he should be prepared to grow grapes that can withstand the heat.

“We have to stay in contact with the climate and the ‘terroir,’ ” said Mure, tromping between the rows of leafy vines heavy with the last of this year’s purple pinot noir grapes. “We have to adapt. It’s a question of survival.”

“Terroir” is an ephemeral French description of the soil, slope, climate and locality that give each wine label its unique flavor and aroma.

Mure is discovering that the regimentation of the French wine production system that has allowed climate change to be documented so accurately is now threatening to undermine the very industry it was designed to protect.

Before he can plant the experimental grapes, Mure must obtain the permission of the powerful Alsace Wine Association, watchdog of the region’s viniculture reputation and tradition. Without its approval, said his daughter, Veronique, planting different grapes would be “as illegal as planting marijuana” under French wine laws.

“Of course, we have to adapt to climate changes,” said Boesch, the association president and a wine grower. But he added, “We have to preserve our identity. Our identity is not Syrah, it’s Riesling.

Scientists warn that climate change is advancing too rapidly for the cumbersome French wine bureaucracy.

“Some vintners, like Rene Thomas, are ahead of others,” said Philippe Kuntzmann, a grapevine specialist at Interprofessional Technical Center for Vines and Wine in the Alsace regional capital of Colmar. “Others are more traditional; they want to wait and see. If you wait too long, it will be too late.”

Mure’s daughter, who studied agronomy and biology in college, said she sees change as the only way to pass the Mure heritage on to her 2 1/2 -year-old daughter, Margaux (as in the wine), and the son she is expecting to deliver in November.

“Yes, it’s a radical idea,” she said. “We don’t say tomorrow we’ll get rid of pinot noir and replace it with Syrah. It takes years and years to see the results in winemaking. We think it will be investing in the future to have this experiment.”

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MEMORIES OF LAST SUMMER and Princess Diana

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The last of the summer foliage in Carl Schurz Park. 5:00 PM. Photo: JH.

BY DAVID PATRICK COLUMBIA

By the time you read this, over in London, the memorial service at the Guards Chapel in St. James’s Park marking the 10th anniversary of the death of Diana, Princess of Wales is over. Prince Charles has returned to Highgrove to spend the weekend with his wife the Duchess of Cornwall. The Queen and Prince Philip have returned to Balmoral for the rest of their summer holiday, and Diana will remain, isolated now as a memory, her energy still able to stir up the emotional life of Britain as if she’d ony been away for the summer.

The Royal Family, through the auspices of Diana’s two sons, Prince William and Prince Harry, managed to control some of the public interest in this by holding the service in a venue less accessible to the crowd, thereby preventing exposing more of the awkwardness of the Royal persona. They carefully selected a public space while still keeping the public away. More than just a bid for “privacy” keeping the public away was a political maneuver to move, or at least obscure some of the focus of the tragic princess’ end and let the Windsors return ultimately unscathed to their antediluvian isolation from the rest of us.

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Ideally for the Royal Family, there wouldn’t have been any kind of service except maybe for her children, siblings, relatives, etc – the way it is in any “common” family. Let’s not forget Diana was not “royal” and after her divorce, the House of Windsor took back her HRH (and ended up giving it to her rival – the “third person” in her ill-fated marriage). That means nothing to you and me, but it means a wagonload or two to them and all the other HRH’s and HIH’s and HSH’s in the world.

By the time of her death, Diana was very much in the way, a serious liability to the monarchy. The Royals may be a form of amusement for the rest of the world but it is as serious an institution in the world as the Roman Catholic Church. It is, after all the mask of Establishment England. It is purely political.

Diana’s fame and popularity was so great as to influence the public perception of the monarchy. Her funeral proved that. Had she lived, her presence (and her talent for drawing attention to herself and her dramas) would have gummed up the works. Camilla may never have had the opportunity to become the duchess, and it very possibly would have continued to make Prince Charles look like a ninny, which he still manages to do at times, even without her.

More cumbersome was that her appeal had the elements that nurture mythology. Aside from her beauty and her photogenic charm, Diana lost at love. And in a big way, in terms of romantic fairytales. Her prince had deluded her, or worse, she had deluded herself about her prince. Until it was too late.

So, whatever it was for those around her in the goldfish bowl existence, we are left with the public image of the woman, and the illusion which provides endless space for our imagination. In London, in the Telegraph a few days ago, they re-published a piece on Diana, written by Lord Deedes, the distinguished former Cabinet minister/editor/journalist. W.F. Deedes himself passed away two weeks ago at 94.

His account of Diana is called “Princess Diana, injured angel.” It is arguably the best monograph ever written about the woman whose life energy touched hundreds of millions, and whose private personality evoked a gamut of emotions and perceptions.

And, if you should read, and then are curious to know more about the wise man who wrote it, click here for the link to his obituary in the Telegraph on this past August 17th.

New York Social Diary

See Related: TENTH ANNIVERSARY OF PRINCESS DIANA PASSING – The time has come to let her rest in peace

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STREET VIOLENCE: One more Bayview shooting death

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Officers are investigating an early morning homicide in the Bayview district, a San Francisco police dispatcher said.

Police responded to reports of shots fired in the 6600 block of Third Street around 2:30 a.m., a dispatcher said.

Dejohn Maybon, 35, was found suffering gunshot wounds and was pronounced dead at the scene.

Bay City News

See Related: STREET VIOLENCE

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SUMMER OF LOVE 40TH ANNIVERSARY – A Sunday happening in San Francisco Golden Gate Park – Don the flowers again and relight that thing

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IF YOU’RE GOING TO SAN FRANCISCO

SCOTT MACKENZIE 1967

BELIEVE IT OR WHAT
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BY PAT MURPHY
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

San Francisco was hot in the summer of 1967, searing accross time and space a cultural revolution proclaimed by others dead almost as soon as it began.

We were young and golden and everybody — everybody — had weird vibrations until their thing got lit.

COME ON BABY LIGHT MY FIRE

JIM MORRISON AND THE DOORS 1967

This writer was there, at eternal Haight and Ashbury, a short haired 17-year-old runaway from Wichita, unable to make it here for very long in 1967.

Today’s celeb flavor of the current decade made it into 1967, as San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom was born on October 10 — three days after a mock funeral parade for the Summer of Love high-kicked the famed intersection with Haight District community leaders bannering its Council of Shame.

As the parade passed, shame had few takers even in October.

It was before AIDS. Before sobriety became de rigueur.

Free and constant sex, cheap and prevalent drugs, a warm place to go to the bathroom, and blissed out rock and roll were our generation’s metanoia.

Our Revelation proscribed having truck with shame, too exultant anyway were we that it only took a minute to find someone to go down.

DOWN ON ME

JANIS JOPLIN

Our good vibrations, their culmination building from immigrant years prior, will refill Speedway Meadows beginning at 10 a.m. in Golden Gate Park.

CALIFORNIA DREAMING

THE MAMAS AND PAPAS

GOOD VIBRATIONS

THE BEE GEES

They were our vibes and they were good but can they be replicated?

Your generation can mouth the words but can you sing the song?

THE WORDS ARE RIGHT

GAVIN NEWSOM

Even if not, we meant to love everybody.

Remember us when we were golden and wanted you to exult, too.

THE WORLD IS AT YOUR COMMAND

THE MAMAS AND PAPAS

HEY MR. TAMBOURINE MAN

BOB DYLAN 1967

TO LOVE SOMEBODY

THE BEE GEES

See Related: A DAY TO REMEMBER – 40 years later

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PAT MURPHY
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
In his youth, Pat Murphy worked as a General Assignment reporter for the Richmond Independent, the Berkeley Daily Gazette, and the San Francisco Chronicle. He served as Managing Editor of the St. Albans (Vermont) Daily Messenger at age 21. Murphy also launched ValPak couponing in San Francisco, as the company’s first San Francisco franchise owner. He walked the bricks, developing ad strategy for a broad range of restaurants and merchants. Pat knows what works and what doesn’t work. His writing skill has been employed by marketing agencies, including Don Solem & Associates. He has covered San Francisco governance for the past ten years. Pat scribes an offbeat view of the human family through Believe It or What.

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SAN JOSE EASTRIDGE MALL ample parking space for crash landing of small plane – Minor injuries

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San Jose Eastridge Mall parking lot offered ample landing space.

The Federal Aviation Administration is investigating what caused a small plane to crash this afternoon in the parking lot of a San Jose mall.

According to FAA spokesman Ian Gregor, the pilot of a Cessna 210 was headed to an airport in Hayward when the plane he was flying experienced engine problems.

The pilot attempted to land at Reid-Hillview Airport in San Jose but didn’t make it, instead coming down around 12:30 p.m. in a parking lot of the Eastridge mall.

“Fortunately, nobody on the ground was injured and there was no damage,” Gregor said. “(The plane) hit a couple of trees and nothing else.”

Gregor reported that the two people on board received minor injuries, if any injuries at all, and were taken to a local hospital as a precaution.

Bay City News

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BAY BRIDGE CLOSURE up-to-date traffic reports and delays

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CALTRANS PUBLIC SAFETY WORK

Up-to-date traffic reports and estimated delays caused by Labor Day Weekend closure of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge are available at 511.org.

The bridge will reopen at 5 a.m Tuesday following seismic retrofit construction which closed the span at 8 p.m. Friday.

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CALIFORNIA SUPREME COURT JUSTICES must go back to school, Judicial Council mandates

BY JULIA CHEEVER

The governing body of the California court system has approved a new rule requiring continuing education for justices of the state Supreme Court and Court of Appeal.

The requirement for at least 30 hours of continuing education every three years was enacted by the state Judicial Council at a meeting in San Francisco on Friday.

It is the first time that such a requirement has been imposed on the seven justices of the California Supreme Court and 105 justices of the Court of Appeal.

Supreme Court Chief Justice Ronald George, who chairs the council, said on Friday, “The rules adopted today underscore the importance of continuing education programs to help ensure the professional excellence of our judiciary.”

George said, “All state appellate courts…will benefit from the new program, as will the public at large.”

Last year, the council adopted a similar program for the state’s 1,500 trial court judges and 430 commissioners in the 58 county-based superior courts.

But the continuing education for superior court judges is termed an “expectation” and not a requirement, while the new program for appellate judges is mandatory.

California’s more than 200,000 lawyers, meanwhile, have long had a State Bar requirement of at least 25 hours of continuing legal education every three years.

The appeals court justices can fulfill the requirement through courses offered by judges’ associations, law schools and state and local bar associations. They can receive up to seven hours of credit for online courses and self-directed study and up to 15 hours of credit for acting as faculty to teach other judges or court staff.

The California court system is the largest in the nation. The Court of Appeal, which hears appeals from the superior courts, is divided into six appellate districts.

The San Francisco-based First District, founded in 1904, has 20 justices.

They hear appeals from the superior courts of 12 Bay Area and coastal Northern California counties, including Alameda, Contra Costa, Del Norte, Humboldt, Lake, Marin, Mendocino, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Solano, and Sonoma.

The San Jose-based Sixth District, with seven justices, was carved out of the First District in 1984 to accommodate the growing caseload in the South Bay.

It handles appeals from the Santa Clara, San Benito, Santa Cruz, and Monterey county superior courts.

The 28-member Judicial Council also approved a continuing education requirement for appeals court staff members.

Bay City News

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TENTH ANNIVERSARY OF PRINCESS DIANA PASSING – The time has come to let her rest in peace

Service of Thanksgiving for the Life of Diana, Princess of Wales, 31 August 2007

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PRINCE HARRY IN HIS OWN WORDS

On the tenth anniversary of her death, Members of the Royal Family celebrated the life of Diana, Princess of Wales alongside representatives from the Princess’s charities and well-known public figures.

Princes William and Harry wanted 2007 to be a year in which their mother’s life was celebrated, rather than mourned, with events which captured her personal style and interests. And so the service at the Guards’ Chapel, Wellington Barracks followed on from a Concert for Diana, held at Wembley Stadium on 1 July 2007, the day which would have been the Princess’s 46th birthday.

The church service, held in the Guards’ Chapel in Wellington Barracks, was a more formal and private way to mark The Princess of Wales’s life on the actual anniversary of her death.

William and Harry were heavily involved in setting the tone for the content of the service, and worked closely with the Spencer family, Royal Household staff and the Chaplains to choose hymns, prayers, readings, anthems, and the address for the traditional Anglican service.

The two princes chose the Guards’ Chapel for the service because as Household Cavalry officers it is their regimental chapel.

Both William and Harry spoke during the service. Prince William gave a reading from the Ephesians, whilst Prince Harry shared the brothers’ personal memories of their mother:

‘When she was alive we completely took for granted her unrivalled love of life, laughter, fun and folly. She was our guardian, friend and protector.

She will always be remembered for her amazing public work. But behind the media glare, to us, just two loving children, she was quite simply the best mother in the world.’

Representatives from The Princess of Wales’ charities were invited, including sisters from the Missionaries of Charity.

Her Royal Highness the Duchess of Cornwall and Prince of Wales Consort Camilla had been invited to attend the ceremony by Princes William and Harry and had initially accepted.

However, Clarence House announced on Sunday that she had decided not to go, fearing that her attendance could divert attention from the purpose of the occasion.

In a statement explaining her decision to pull out, Camilla said: “I’m very touched to have been invited by Prince William and Prince Harry to attend the thanksgiving service for their mother Diana, Princess of Wales.

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“I accepted and wanted to support them, however, on reflection I believe my attendance could divert attention from the purpose of the occasion which is to focus on the life and service of Diana.

“I’m grateful to my husband, William and Harry for supporting my decision.”

The Archbishop of Canterbury was asked to contribute two prayers whilst the Bishop of London, who was a friend of the Princess and has been closely involved with her Memorial Fund over the years, gave the address, which focussed on her public work:

‘She proved the elegance of embrace and touch which of course have been used by royal healers throughout the centuries … She sought out places of suffering … and she was not afraid to be with the dying and to comfort them in an unsentimental way.’

The music during the service reflected the Princess’s tastes, and included some of her favourite pieces such as Rachmaninov’s “O Virgin Mother of God rejoice” taken from The Vespers. The piece was sung in its original Church Slavonic – just as the Princess used to listen to it.

Four hymns were included in the service, with pieces from Ireland, Scotland, Wales and England. They included the traditional Irish melody ‘Slane’, ‘The Lord is My Shepherd’, the Scottish tune ‘Crimond’ and the Welsh classic ‘Cwm Rhondda’ and finally, as a climax to the Service, ‘I Vow To Thee, My Country’.

The guests list was made up of friends, family and the charities supported by Diana, Princess of Wales during her lifetime. The service celebrated the Princess’s charity work and the positive effect she had on the lives of other, which was particularly reflected in one of the Archbishop of Canterbury’s prayers:

‘God our father, we remember before thee Diana, Princess of Wales, and offer thee our gratitude for all the memories of her that we treasure still. Her vulnerability, and her willingness to reach out to the excluded and forgotten, touched us all; her generosity gave hope and joy to many.’

The many charities being represented at the service included the Landmine Survivors Network, the National Aids Trust and smaller organisations such as Eureka! The Museum for Children. The flower arrangements on display at the service, which included growing English garden roses, were sent to selected charities following the service.

If you would like to make a contribution to one of Diana, Princess of Wales’s charities, you can contact the Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fund:

The First Floor
The County Hall
Westminster Bridge Road
London SE1 7PB
United Kingdom

Telephone: 020 7902 5500
Email: memorial.fund@memfund.org.uk.

Website: theworkcontinues.org

From Buckingham Palace

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See Related: MEMORIES OF LAST SUMMER AND PRINCESS DIANA

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