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July 27 Videos of The Day – GO AND SIN NO LITTLE – A CUP TOO MANY – FEBRUARY EVERY DAY – July 27 Photo of the Day – NEWSOM STAFFER MIGUEL BUSTOS LEAVES FOR RON DELLUMS ADMINISTRATION – FERRY BUILDING PARTY FOR HERB CAEN MORE MEMORABLE THAN ANY UN HEAD HONCHO – Babies born today will be vivacious – Live radar and weather forecast

July 27 Videos of The Day
GO AND SIN NO LITTLE

A CUP TOO MANY

FEBRUARY EVERY DAY

July 27 Photos of The Day
NEWSOM STAFFER MIGUEL BUSTOS LEAVES FOR RON DELLUMS ADMINISTRATION
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Miguel Bustos, right, welcomes UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon to San Francisco Thursday. Bustos, native San Franciscan and former legislative aide to Congresswoman Barbara Lee, finishes his last day today as senior staffer to San Francisco Mayor Newsom, headed for his new position as director of Inter-Governmental Affairs for Oakland Mayor Ron Dellums.
PHOTO BY BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

SENTINEL SAYS HI TOO
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FERRY BUILDING PARTY FOR HERB CAEN MORE MEMORABLE THAN ANY UN HEAD HONCHO
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JULY 27 BIRTHDAY LORE
You concentrate your earnest efforts on all your undertakings and, with your ambitions and determination, you are capable of great success and happiness. You are vivacious and lovable, and your friends are true and loyal to you. You love with your whole heart and need a sincere and constant love in return.

ADVICE FOR JULY 27
When silk flowers get dusty, put them in a paper bag with several tablespoons of salt and shake gently for two minutes to clean them.

JULY 27 WORD OF THE DAY
Precession. Defintion: The slowly changing position of the stars and equinoxes in the sky resulting from variations in the orientation of Earth’s axis.

JULY 26 IN HISTORY
Died: Bob Hope (comedian & actor), 2003. Severe thunderstorms in Yuma, Arizona, created zero visibility due to dust blowing in the 90 mph winds, 1989.

REALTIME SAN FRANCISCO WEATHER
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Friday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, cloudy through mid morning, then gradual clearing, with a high near 71. West southwest wind between 7 and 13 mph.

Friday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, increasing clouds, with a low around 56. West southwest wind between 8 and 13 mph.

Saturday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, cloudy through mid morning, then gradual clearing, with a high near 70. West southwest wind between 8 and 15 mph.

Saturday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 56. West wind between 8 and 15 mph, with gusts as high as 18 mph.

Sunday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 70.

Sunday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 55.

Monday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 69.

Monday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 55.

Tuesday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 68.

Tuesday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 57.

Wednesday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 68.

Wednesday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 57.

Thursday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 69.

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BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Bill Wilson is a veteran freelance photographer whose work is published by San Francisco and East Bay media. Bill embraced photography at the age of eight. In recent years, his photos capture historic record of the San Francisco LGBT community in the Bay Area Reporter (BAR). Bill has contributed to the Sentinel for the past three years.

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STREET VIOLENCE: San Francisco global leader in drop-off homicide service

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The victim of a fatal San Francisco shooting was allegedly dropped off at Ingleside Police Station this afternoon, an officer said.

Police believe that the victim received a shotgun wound to the head at 23rd Street and South Van Ness before being dropped off at the police station.

The victim was dropped off at around 3 p.m., police said.

Homicide investigators and the San Francisco medical examiner are investigating the incident.

Bay City News

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STREET VIOLENCE: Assailant strikes San Francisco police officer with truck – High speed chase naps suspect in Oakland

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The driver of a white pickup truck who struck a San Francisco police officer and led police on a high-speed chase across the Bay Bridge was taken into custody in Oakland, San Francisco police Sgt. Steve Mannina said this morning.

The incident began today at 1:30 a.m. when a San Francisco police officer was directing traffic at Harrison and Essex streets, Mannina said.

The suspect was driving a white pickup truck, possibly a Ford F150, eastbound in the westbound lanes of Harrison Street.

The officer attempted to wave the truck down and stop it, but the suspect did not decrease his speed and continued to drive toward the officer.

The officer fired at the truck just before the suspect struck him, Mannina said. The officer was taken to San Francisco General Hospital with non life-threatening injuries.

After the suspect struck the officer he merged onto eastbound Interstate Highway 80. An off-duty San Francisco police officer witnessed the incident and pursued the suspect across the Bay Bridge into Alameda County, Mannina said.

The off-duty officer coordinated with other police officers and the suspect was stopped and arrested on Interstate Highway 880 at the Broadway exit in Oakland, Mannina said. The chase ended about 15 minutes after it began in San Francisco.

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PG&E SOLAR POWER expands to 400,000 additional Northern California homes

Pacific Gas and Electric Company announced Wednesdayday that it has entered into a landmark renewable energy agreement with Solel-MSP-1 to purchase renewable energy from the Mojave Solar Park, to be constructed in California’s Mojave Desert.

The project will deliver 553 megawatts of solar power, the equivalent of powering 400,000 homes, to PG&E’s customers in northern and central California. The Mojave Solar Park project is now the world’s largest single solar commitment.

“The solar thermal project announced today is another major milestone in realizing our goal to supply 20 percent of our customers’ energy needs with clean renewable energy,” said Fong Wan, vice president of Energy Procurement, PG&E.

“Through the agreement with Solel, we can harness the sun’s climate-friendly power to provide our customers with reliable and cost-effective energy on an unprecedented scale.”

The plant utilizes Solel’s patented and commercially-proven solar thermal parabolic trough technology. Over the past 20 years, the technology has powered nine operating solar power plants in the Mojave Desert and is currently generating 354 MW of annual electricity.

When fully operational in 2011, the Mojave Solar Park plant will cover up to 6,000 acres, or nine square miles in the Mojave Desert. Solel is working closely with URS Corporation in the development of the Mojave Solar Park, which when commercial will rely on 1.2 million mirrors and 317 miles of vacuum tubing to capture the desert sun’s heat.

“We are thrilled to bring 553 MW of clean energy to California,” said Avi Brenmiller, chief executive officer of Solel Solar Systems. “Our proven solar technology means Solel can economically turn the energy of the warm California sun into clean power for the state’s homes and businesses.”

Solel Solar Systems of Israel, the world’s largest solar thermal company, is the parent company of Solel-MSP-1 LLC. Solel’s leading technology utilizes parabolic mirrors to concentrate solar energy onto its patented UVAC 2008 solar thermal receivers.

The receivers contain a fluid that is heated and circulated, and the heat is released to generate steam. The steam powers a turbine to produce electricity, which can be delivered to a utility’s electric grid. The electricity generated by Mojave Solar Park will use some of the transmission infrastructure originally built for the now dormant coal-fired Mojave Generation Station to deliver the power to PG&E’s customers.

The agreement filed yesterday with the California Public Utilities Commission is part of PG&E’s broader renewable energy portfolio.

PG&E currently supplies 12 percent of its energy from qualifying renewable sources under California’s Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) program. With more than 50 percent of the energy PG&E delivers to its customers coming from generating sources that emit no carbon dioxide, PG&E provides among the cleanest energy in the nation.

PG&E is aggressively adding renewable electric power resources to its supply and is on target to exceed 20 percent under contract or delivered by 2010.

With the Solel-MSP-1 announcement, and other recently signed renewable agreements, PG&E now has contracts to provide18 percent of its future energy supply from renewable sources.

PG&E has recently signed several other renewable energy agreements including an 85 MW wind project with PPM Energy, 7 MW of utility-scale solar projects with Cleantech America and GreenVolts, and a 25.5 MW contract with Western GeoPower, Inc. for a new geothermal energy facility in Sonoma County, California. PG&E is seeking regulatory approval of these five renewable energy contracts.

California’s RPS Program requires each utility to increase its procurement of eligible renewable generating resources by one percent of load per year to achieve a twenty percent renewables goal by 2010. The RPS Program was passed by the Legislature and is managed by California’s Public Utilities Commission and Energy Commission.

Solel Solar Systems also provides key technology components for new solar thermal plants currently under construction in the U.S. and in Spain. In addition, Solel and Sacyr-Vallehermoso are jointly building solar power plants in Spain and Solel recently completed the upgrading of more than 100 MW of solar facilities in California.

Solel‘s headquarters, manufacturing plant, research and development center are in Beit Shemesh, Israel with its U.S. development office in Los Angeles, California.

For more information about Solel, please visit the website at pge.com.

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July 26 Videos of The Day – NOW THAT’S FISHY – UNIVERSAL DENTAL CARE – UNCHAIN THAT WUS – July 16 Photos of The Day – GROUNDBREAKING FOR CROCKER AMAZON SOCCER FIELDS – Babies born today will be domineering – Live radar and weather forecast

July 26 Videos of The Day
NOW THAT’S FISHY

UNIVERSAL DENTAL CARE

UNCHAIN THAT WUS

July 26 Photos of The Day
GROUNDBREAKING FOR CROCKER AMAZON SOCCER FIELDS
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PHOTOS BY BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

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JULY 26 BIRTHDAY LORE
You are capable and dependable, although rather domineering. You are fond of good literature and are a fluent and intelligent talker and an amusing entertainer. You prefer the company of the opposite sex. Marry young, and your home life will be congenial and happy.

ADVICE FOR JULY 26
Squirt fresh lemon juice on windowsills and the bottom of doors to keep ants from coming into the house.

JULY 26 WORD OF THE DAY
Pareidolia. Defintion: The erroneous or fanciful perception of a pattern or meaning in something that is actually ambiguous or random — like the Man in the Moon or animals in cloud formations or religious images in tortillas.

JULY 26 IN HISTORY
The SS Andrea Doria sunk near Nantucket Lightship, MA, 1956. Catskill, New York, and Westfield, Massachusetts, each got 15 inches of rain, causing flash floods and enormous erosion damage, 1819.

REALTIME SAN FRANCISCO WEATHER
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Thursday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, cloudy through mid morning, then gradual clearing, with a high near 69. West southwest wind between 8 and 11 mph.

Thursday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, increasing clouds, with a low around 56. West southwest wind between 7 and 11 mph.

Friday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, cloudy through mid morning, then gradual clearing, with a high near 70. West wind between 7 and 13 mph.

Friday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 57. West wind between 8 and 13 mph.

Saturday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 71.

Saturday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 57.

Sunday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 74.

Sunday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a low around 56.

Monday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 73.

Monday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 55.

Tuesday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 73.

Tuesday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 58.

Wednesday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 72.

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BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Bill Wilson is a veteran freelance photographer whose work is published by San Francisco and East Bay media. Bill embraced photography at the age of eight. In recent years, his photos capture historic record of the San Francisco LGBT community in the Bay Area Reporter (BAR). Bill has contributed to the Sentinel for the past three years.

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LATEST SAN FRANCISCO RESTAURANT REVIEWS, ratings, food and wine special events now available through Visa USA

Visa USA today announced the launch of an enhanced Visa Signature Dining Web site and a unique partnership with Zagat Survey, one of the most trusted resources for restaurant ratings and reviews.

The new site was built to fulfill Visa Signature cardholders’ appetite for epicurean experiences and information, enabling them to view Zagat’s restaurant ratings and reviews; access unique experiences, such as wine tastings, cooking classes and private chef events; and make dining reservations through the Visa Signature Concierge.

“Visa Signature cardholders have a clear affinity for fine wine and food, and they dine out seven times every two weeks on average,” said Jim McCarthy, senior vice president, Visa USA.

“They want to savor every experience — from casual dinners to tasting the country’s best food and wine. Our epicurean offerings help them do this by providing unique information and access to gourmet events that appeal to their desire to refine their palate.”

Research indicates that the new affluent — Visa Signature’s core audience, defined as U.S. households with $125,000 or more in annual income — rely on the internet when seeking information and making decisions, including where to dine.

Affluent consumers are 73 percent more likely than the average consumer to be heavy Internet users.1 And the overwhelming majority of Visa Signature cardholders (92 percent) who make restaurant reservations online tend also to research restaurants on the Internet.

Through the site, time-stretched affluent consumer has an easy way to pursue their epicurean interests online, where they most often go for information.
The site features information on fine dining and wine, as well as a point of entry to unique epicurean events, including:

Complimentary access to the latest Zagat restaurant ratings and reviews.

Access to epicurean events through partnerships with Sonoma County Vintners, Bon Appétit and Gourmet. These events provide opportunities to taste the best food and wine in the country and include unforgettable Sonoma wine country experiences, private dinners with chefs and wine makers, and wine and food pairing events.

Special benefits at more than 40 Sonoma County wineries, including complimentary wine tastings and discounts on purchases.

Cooking classes through a new partnership with the Institute of Culinary Education (ICE).

Dining reservations at restaurants worldwide through the Visa Signature Concierge.

Unique Zagat Offerings for Visa Signature Cardholders

By Visa’s new partnership with Zagat Survey, Visa Signature cardholders can enjoy access to Zagat information, which is based on the opinions of thousands of avid restaurant-goers worldwide. The Visa Signature Dining site enables cardholders to learn what other discerning diners think about new restaurants via Zagat’s online community of food and wine enthusiasts.

They will also receive discounts on subscriptions to ZAGAT.com, which offers unlimited access to ratings and reviews for restaurants in 85 cities worldwide, nightlife in 23 cities, hotels in 103 countries and attractions in 158 cities.

Visa Signature cardholders who want to stay informed while on the move can receive discounted subscriptions to ZAGAT TO GO. ZAGAT TO GO gives users mobile access to restaurant ratings and reviews, as well as information on the top bars, nightclubs and lounges, the world’s top hotels, and top U.S. golf courses via PDA’s and cell phones.

Cardholders can find exactly what they’re looking for quickly and easily, and they can add reservations directly to their PDA calendar.

“Visa Signature cardholders have a distinctive taste for all things epicurean. Through this new partnership, we’re combining the shared experiences of 300,000 savvy Zagat surveyors with Visa’s broad offerings to give their cardholders the information they want to help them make the best decisions on where to dine,” said Tim Zagat, CEO of Zagat Survey.

Rewards and Benefits That Help Cardholders Get the Most out of Life

From benefits that save time to benefits that safeguard purchases, Visa Signature helps cardholders get the most out of life. In addition to a choice of numerous airline, hotel and other premium reward partners, cardholders enjoy access to around-the-clock complimentary concierge services through the Visa Signature Concierge; epicurean events and reservations at the hottest restaurants; premium merchant offers; and access to exclusive events such as the Olympics, Super Bowl and the Tony Awards. Since the Visa Signature card is accepted at millions of merchants worldwide, cardholders have even more opportunities to do everything on their life’s list of things to do by using the extraordinary benefits of Visa Signature.
About Visa USA.

See Related: DINING

See Related BE GLAD FOR SMALL RESTAURANT OWNERS AND THE JUDICIAL THIRD BRANCH OF GOVERNMENT

Business Wire

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JULY 25 – Exhibition on the Life and Times of San Francisco Mayor Edward Robeson Taylor begins – Symbol of 1907 City Recovery

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San Francisco Mayor Edward Robeson Taylor

The City Redeemed: An Exhibition on the Life and Times of Mayor Edward Robeson Taylor

This exhibition explores the life of Mayor Edward Robeson Taylor, an extraordinary personality and symbol of recovery for the city of San Francisco following the 1906 Earthquake and Fire.

Taylor was appointed to office in July, 1907 to fill the vacancy occurring by the conviction and imprisonment of Mayor Eugene Schmitz and he served until January, 1910.

During his administration, he reorganized City government, began to rebuild devastated City buildings, headed off a bubonic plague epidemic, secured the first Federal permits for the Hetch Hetchy water system and started the Municipal Railway.

Among his many achievements in his personal life, Taylor was Dean of Hastings Law School for twenty years, a physician and President of the Cooper Medical School which became the Stanford Medical School, a San Francisco Public Library trustee for forty years, a bibliophile and poet, and a founder and first president of the Book Club of California.

The exhibition will culminate the City’s year-long “San Francisco Rising” commemoration of the 1906 Earthquake and Fire Centennial.

It is presented in conjunction with a new biography of Edward Robeson Taylor and his 30 months as Mayor which appears in installments in the April and September issues of the Argonaut, the Journal of the San Francisco Museum and Historical Society.

Curated by James W. Haas and presented by the San Francisco History Center of the San Francisco Public Library. Funded by The Book Club of California.

Exhibition Dates:
July 25 – October 12, 2007

Location:
San Francisco History Center
San Francisco Main Library, 6th Floor
100 Larkin StreetSan Francisco, CA 94102

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This exhibition is free and open to the public.

The San Francisco Public Library

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July 25 Videos of The Day – FATHER DUFFY IS FULL OF SHIT – SPEAKER PELOSI LEADS THE PACK – THOSE EYES – July 25 Photos of The Day – WESTERN ADDITION ‘MO MAGIC’ YOUTH WORKS OF ART – Babies born today will be good in the private sector – Live radar and weather forecast

July 25 Videos of The Day
FATHER DUFFY IS FULL OF SHIT

SPEAKER PELOSI LEADS THE PACK

THOSE EYES

Photos of The Day
WESTERN ADDITION ‘MO MAGIC’ YOUTH WORKS OF ART
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The works of Western Addition children from various summer youth programs displayed at the African and African American Art and Culture Complex, located at 762 Fulton Street, San Francisco.
PHOTOS BY BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

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JULY 25 BIRTHDAY LORE
You have a magnetic personality, make friends easily, and are popular with everyone. You have good business sense and executive ability and are unusually fortunate in all your dealings. You are openhearted and sincere and love with a deep and strong devotion.

ADVICE FOR JULY 25
Fresh grass clippings make excellent garden mulch. (Don’t bunch clippings too heavily around young plants, as the grass can burn tender stalks.)

JULY 25 WORD OF THE DAY
Junk. Defintion: Pieces of old cable or old cordage, used for making gaskets, mats, swabs, etc., and when picked to pieces, forming oakum for filling the seams of ships.

JULY 25 IN HISTORY
Ulysses S. Grant received the rank of General of the Army, the first American officer to be so designated, 1866. Thirty to 40 inches of rain fell near Alvin, in southeast Texas, 1979.

REALTIME SAN FRANCISCO WEATHER
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Wednesday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, then gradually becoming mostly sunny, with a high near 70. West southwest wind between 9 and 14 mph.

Wednesday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, increasing clouds, with a low around 57. West southwest wind between 8 and 14 mph.

Thursday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, then gradually becoming mostly sunny, with a high near 70. West southwest wind between 8 and 11 mph.

Thursday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 57. West southwest wind between 8 and 11 mph.

Friday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 70.

Friday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 57.

Saturday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 71.

Saturday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a low around 57.

Sunday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 69.

Sunday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a low around 56.

Monday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 71.

Monday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a low around 55.

Tuesday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 71.

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BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Bill Wilson is a veteran freelance photographer whose work is published by San Francisco and East Bay media. Bill embraced photography at the age of eight. In recent years, his photos capture historic record of the San Francisco LGBT community in the Bay Area Reporter (BAR). Bill has contributed to the Sentinel for the past three years.

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NEWSOM LACKS LEADERSHIP ON PUBLIC SAFETY

BELIEVE IT OR WHAT
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BY PAT MURPHY
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

Mayor Newsom has not shown leadership on public safety of San Franciscans.

Instead, this San Francisco mayor strives for community consensus on how best to end street violence.

And sulks before neighborhood meetings when confronted with his effort leaving San Francisco streets vile, most recently before a Polk Street gathering of residents and merchants.

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Photos by Bill Wilson

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Consensus building began more than two years ago as a broad range of San Francisco elected leadership got behind movement toward community policing.

It speedily succeeded with a multiplicity of programs to assist those arrested — and even those at risk for arrest — with immediate community help to claim the propserity, security, and dignity every San Franciscan needs.

It also promised innovative police intervention to stop criminal behavior, with instant access to means for the desperate to find crime needless.

The best and brightest San Franciscans poured their lifesblood into delivering a two-pronged model that works.

Still, today’s reality is the streets are as murderous and vile as they were two years ago. This mayor’s streets have the feel of precursor 1920s Germany.

Newsom wisely insists, “I want to make sure we do this right,” to stop criminal behavior — which must be stopped first — without return to rousts and cracked skulls.

To match San Francisco enlightened view of police work, consensus effort locked in individualized policing techniques crafted for each each neighborhood and localized culture.

The Sentinel suggests this well intentioned autonomy resulted in many police districts not incorporating acceptable and proven policing which is working in the Tenderloin usherered by Police Captain Gary Jimenez.

Newsom needs to get it in his head that he is the only official with the authority and stature to actually make things happen — to actually lead.

But Newsom reacts as if returning safety to San Francisco streets is all about him, all about his performance.

Stopping the behavior which turned San Francisco streets vile is bigger than any mayor, bigger than any political career.

End your self-centered sulk, Mr. Mayor, and lead.

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PAT MURPHY
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
In his youth, Pat Murphy worked as a General Assignment reporter for the Richmond Independent, the Berkeley Daily Gazette, and the San Francisco Chronicle. He served as Managing Editor of the St. Albans (Vermont) Daily Messenger at age 21. Murphy also launched ValPak couponing in San Francisco, as the company’s first San Francisco franchise owner. He walked the bricks, developing ad strategy for a broad range of restaurants and merchants. Pat knows what works and what doesn’t work. His writing skill has been employed by marketing agencies, including Don Solem & Associates. He has covered San Francisco governance for the past ten years. Pat scribes an offbeat view of the human family through Believe It or What.

bill-wilson-cropped-160-pixels-mug.jpg
BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Bill Wilson is a veteran freelance photographer whose work is published by San Francisco and Bay Area media. Bill embraced photography at the age of eight. In recent years, his photos capture historic record of the San Francisco LGBT community in the Bay Area Reporter (BAR). Bill has contributed to the Sentinel for the past three years.

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BE GLAD FOR SMALL RESTAURANT OWNERS AND THE JUDICIAL THIRD BRANCH OF GOVERNMENT

BELIEVE IT OR WHAT
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BY PAT MURPHY
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

San Francisco small restaurant owners are scorned on all fronts for their federal lawsuit insisting they have the right to determine employee benefits, not the City now implementing universal health care with forced payment by restaurant owners necessary…

Our young San Francisco mayor — The Gav brooks 40 October 10 — publicly scalds restaurant owners every chance he gets for launching the lawsuit… Newsom notes threateningly he is not happy about the lawsuit

Mandated restaurant owner payment is essential to establishing universal health care… Says The Gav…

Really, Gav honey, you should be more worried about them not being happy with you… Your performance is arrogant…

Newsom, partnered with Supervisor Tom Ammiano, imposed the employer mandate provision with very little imput from restaurant owners… It was only when owners noted they had the power to resist that they were seriously ushered to a seat…

With Ammiano, quick to go brittle, snorting he had heard owner hardship complaints for ever so long…

Further, that Ammiano did not believe hardship complaints and anyway their money is needed to benefit all San Franciscans, suck it up…

Suck this up: People don’t go into business to create jobs… Or deliver benefits…

People go into business to make money, say it out loud…

To use that money to cement their unqiue dream into expanding reality… Secondarily growing that reality with new jobs, more jobs, and newly employed San Franciscans receiving new benefits…

It is odious that in a town which works so hard to maintain neighborhood character, in a town where neighborhood character is greatly defined by world famed unique eateries, the venal attempting to tap altruist sentiment would treat our unique eateries with such pompous dismissal…

Owner after owner testified that the imposed mandate would close their doors and foreclose opening of new small restaurants…

That trend is already underway… Preponderence of new restaurant openings in San Francisco are low-cost formula food fops…

Be glad we have that judicial third branch of government, and go out and encourage owners who work 14 to 16 hours every day to keep their dream alive and your neighborhood unique…

See Related: HEALTH CARE

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PAT MURPHY
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
In his youth, Pat Murphy worked as a General Assignment reporter for the Richmond Independent, the Berkeley Daily Gazette, and the San Francisco Chronicle. He served as Managing Editor of the St. Albans (Vermont) Daily Messenger at age 21. Murphy also launched ValPak couponing in San Francisco, as the company’s first San Francisco franchise owner. He walked the bricks, developing ad strategy for a broad range of restaurants and merchants. Pat knows what works and what doesn’t work. His writing skill has been employed by marketing agencies, including Don Solem & Associates. He has covered San Francisco governance for the past ten years. Pat scribes an offbeat view of the human family through Believe It or What.

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SAN FRANCISCO FEDERAL COURT rules consumer lawsuit against Cingular-AT&T may proceed

Santa Monica, CA — A lawsuit charging that Cingular (now AT&T) engages in false and misleading advertising when offering “rebates” on cell phones may proceed, a federal court has ruled.

The suit, brought under California’s consumer protection laws, states that the cell phone company promised to pay rebates to people who bought cell phones, and advertised discounted prices that reflected the promised rebate. But instead of getting a rebate check, purchasers received a “VISA Reward card” that can only be used under numerous restrictions and for a limited period of time. By the time consumers found out they were not getting a rebate check, it was too late to cancel Cingular’s wireless service without paying an Early Termination Fee of $175.

“In their intense marketing for cellular services, cell phone companies make price the paramount focus,” said Foundation for Taxpayer and Consumer Rights’ Harvey Rosenfield, one of the lawyers in the case.

“Cingular told consumers that they would ultimately pay a discounted price, once the rebate was received. In some cases, consumers were led to believe the phone would be ‘free’ — that it would end up costing them nothing after the rebate. But instead of getting money back, consumers get a VISA Reward card. Purchasers never got the promised discount. None of this was made clear to consumers. This deceitful practice hurts consumers and other cell phone companies that advertise honestly.”

Court Rejects Cingular’s Move to Stop Case

The case was filed in California state court on behalf of all affected consumers in June 2006, but Cingular transferred the case to federal court in San Francisco. In May, Cingular asked the federal court to dismiss the suit, arguing that consumers were not harmed or misled and that California’s consumer protection laws do not prevent the company from engaging in the practice. Last week, the court rejected Cingular’s motion, allowing the case to proceed. The court’s ruling states:

“The court finds that a reasonable consumer, upon seeing an advertisement that promises a ‘rebate’ of a certain amount, would generally understand that advertisement to mean that the amount will be returned to the consumer in cash, check or its equivalent… . The more terms, conditions and restrictions that are placed upon the form of tender, the less equivalent it becomes to cash or check… .” The “numerous terms and conditions” of the VISA Reward Card “raise an issue of fact about whether the VISA cards could be reasonably interpreted as equivalent to cash or check.”

Ads Changed After Suit, But Still Mislead

After the suit was filed, the company, now called AT&T after its merger with Cingular, modified some of its ads to state, in fine print, that the advertised price was “after debit card.” However, the company’s web site still refers to a “mail-in rebate card.” Consumer advocates contend the new language remains misleading.

The lawsuit asks the court to order the company to stop the practice, and to provide refunds to consumers.

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SCHWARZENEGGR ANNOUNCES new appointments

Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger today announced the following appointments:

Derral Adams, 59, of Fresno , has been appointed warden of California State Prison, Corcoran. He has served as acting warden since 2006 and previously served as warden of the Substance Abuse Treatment Facility at California State Prison, Corcoran from 2000 and 2006. From 1995 to 2000, Adams served as chief deputy warden for the Central California Women’s Facility, where he also served as acting warden in 2000. Previously, he was a correctional administrator during the opening of Wasco State Prison in 1990 and continued in this position until 1995. He also served as the equal employment opportunity administrator for Wasco State Prison during this period. Adams began his career with the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation in 1979 as a carpenter at San Quentin State Prison. Prior to working in corrections, he was a construction manager for Yancey Construction from 1976 to 1977 and Sweda Construction from 1977 to 1979. Adams served in the U.S. Army from 1967 to 1970. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $129,108. Adams is a Republican.

Ruben Barrales, 45, of Del Mar, has been appointed to the San Diego County Fair Board of Directors (22nd District Agricultural Association). He has served as president and chief executive officer of the San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce since 2006. Barrales previously served as a deputy assistant to President George W. Bush from 2001 to 2006 where he was the President’s liaison to state and local elected officials. Prior to that, he served on the San Mateo County Board of Supervisors for four years. Barrales is a member of the California Speaker’s Commission on State and Local Government Finance, the California Commission of Local Governance for the 21st Century and the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research. This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no salary. Barrales is a Republican.

Steven Brown, 60, of Chico , has been appointed to the State Board of Fire Services. He has served as the fire chief of the Chico Fire Department since 1995. Previously, he held several positions with the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection from 1964 to 1995 including chief of the CDF/Butte County Fire Department. He served in the U.S. Army as a 1st lieutenant from 1968 to 1971. Brown is a member of the California Fire Chiefs Association, California Firefighter’s Association and the International Association of Fire Chiefs. This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no salary. Brown is a Republican.

Jerry Davies, 65, of Sacramento , has been appointed to the State Board of Fire Services. He has served as director of media relations for the Farmers Insurance Group since 2006. Davies previously was director of communications for the Personal Insurance Federation of California from 1995 to 2006. He currently owns Davies Communications and also served as president from 1985 to 1995. Prior to that, Davies served as director of communications for Farmers Alliance Insurance Companies from 1982 to 1985 and was regional director for the Insurance Information Institute in New York from 1975 to 1982. He is a member of the Fire Safe Council Board of Directors. This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no salary. Davies is a Republican.

Kim Fletcher, 79, of Rancho Santa Fe, has been appointed to the San Diego County Fair Board of Directors (22nd District Agricultural Association). He has served as president of Investors Leasing Corporation since 1992. Fletcher previously was a trainee and chair of the HomeFed Bank Board of Directors from 1950 to 1992. He is director emeritus of the University of San Diego Board of Trustees, past chair of United Way , past member of the Sharp Memorial Hospital Board of Directors and is active in San Dieguito Boys and Girls Club. This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no salary. Fletcher is a Republican.

Vivian Hardage, 53, of Rancho Santa Fe, has been appointed to the San Diego County Fair Board of Directors (22nd District Agricultural Association). She has served on the Board of Directors since 2005 and co-founded the Vision of Children Foundation in 1995 where she also serves as a board member. Hardage previously was a realtor for Plaza Del Sol Real Estate from 1984 to 1989. She is a member and founder of the Fairbanks Republican Women Federated and is a member of the Rancho Santa Fe Women’s Fund and Country Friends. This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no salary. Hardage is a Republican.

Richard O. Johnson, M.D., MPH, 61, of Mammoth Lakes , has been appointed to the California Emergency Council. He has served as the public health officer for Mono County since 2002 and also has served as interim public health officer for Inyo County since 2006. Additionally, Johnson has served as a pediatrician for the Southern Mono Healthcare District at Mammoth Hospital since 1996. Previously, he was a pediatrician and managing partner at Pediatric Associates of Pasadena from 1979 to 1996 and served at Huntington Memorial Hospital as coordinator of the pediatric residency program with the Children’s Hospital Los Angeles from 1979 to 1983. Prior to that, Johnson was a staff neonatologist from 1977 to 1979 and also served his residency in pediatrics from 1975 to 1977 at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center . His experience includes two years of service as a medical doctor in the U.S. Army Reserve and two years as a civilian staff pediatrician and acting medical director for the Hoa Khanh Children’s Hospital in Danang , South Vietnam . This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no salary. Johnson is a Republican.

Barry Nussbaum, 52, of Rancho Santa Fe, has been appointed to the San Diego County Fair Board of Directors (22nd District Agricultural Association). He has served on the Board of Directors since 1999 including four terms as president and currently serves as chair of fair operations. Nussbaum has also served as chief executive officer for BNC Real Estate since 1977. He co-founded Digital Orchid in 2002 and PR Nutrition in 1992. Nussbaum served as a board member of Frisch’s Restaurant Incorporated from 1997 to 1999. He is actively involved in the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, Jewish National Fund and the Anti-Defamation League. This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no salary. Nussbaum is a Republican.

Susan Phillips, 54, of Granite Bay , has been appointed assistant division chief of financial assistance for the Department of Housing and Community Development (HCD). She has over 22 years of California government service and is currently serving as staff services manager III for HCD. From 2000 to 2004, Phillips served as a staff services manager I for the California Student Aid Commission. Previously, she worked for the State Water Resources Control Board where she was a staff services manager I from 1998 to 2000 and associate government program analyst from 1991 to 1996. From 1996 to 1998, she was a staff services manager I for the Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs. Prior to that, Phillips served as an associate government program analyst for the Department of Education from 1987 to 1991 and was an employment officer for the Employment Development Department from 1976 to 1978. She left state service for two years to work as a housing specialist for the City of Pomona from 1978 to 1980. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $86,070. Phillips is a Democrat.

Daniel Robbins, 40, of Calabasas, has been appointed to the Commission on Uniform State Laws. Since 1996, he has worked for the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) where he currently serves as vice president and associate general counsel. Robbins has previously held several positions with MPAA including vice president and chief technology counsel; vice president and senior technology counsel; and vice president and counsel. Prior to joining MPAA, he was an associate for the law firm Graham & James from 1992 to 1996 and held the same position with the law firm Pepper, Hamilton & Scheetz in 1992. He served on the State Bar Business Law Section Uniform Commercial Code Committee from 1998 to 2001. This position does not require Senate confirmation and the compensation is $100 per diem. Robbins is a Republican.

Aubry Stone, 62, of Sacramento , has been appointed to the Commission for Economic Development. He has served as president and chief executive officer for the California Black Chamber of Commerce since 1994. Stone previously was a branch manager for Metropolitan Life from 1985 to 1994. He also served in the U.S. Air Force from 1962 to 1984 before retiring as superintendent of operations. Stone is a past member of the Sacramento Metro Chamber, Mayor’s Economic Development Council and the Capitol Area Development Authority Board of Directors. This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no salary. Stone is a Democrat.

Ashley Swearengin, 35, of Fresno , has been appointed to the Commission for Economic Development. She has served as executive director for the Office of Community and Economic Development at California State University , Fresno since 2000. Swearengin has also served as chief operating officer of the Fresno Regional Jobs Initiative since 2003 and lead executive for the California Partnership for the San Joaquin Valley since 2006. Previously, she was director of the Central Valley Business Incubator from 1993 to 2000 and development coordinator for the law firm Baker, Manock & Jensen from 1995 to 1998. Prior to that, she was a client services representative for the law firm Jackson, Emerich, Pedreira & Nahigian from 1994 to 1995. Swearengin is a board member of the Fresno West Coalition for Economic Development Community Development Corporation, the Fresno Citizens for Good Government Board of Directors and the Fresno Business Council. This position does not require Senate confirmation and there is no salary. Swearengin is a Republican.

The Governor’s Office of Communications

THE INSIDER JOURNAL REACHING THOSE WHO MAKE THINGS HAPPEN IN STAGE, FILM, FINE ARTS, POLITICS AND GOVERNANCE
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NEW BUSINESS REVIEW LAUNCH benefits San Francisco Bay Area underprivileged children

Neighbor and My New Red Shoes today launched a partnership to build a bank of “wisdom” through reviews of local businesses and answers to user-posted questions while at the same time raising charitable funds.

From today until August 25th, every review entered at Neighbor.com under the code SHOES will contribute $1 to My New Red Shoes, up to a total of $10,000. My New Red Shoes provides brand new shoes and school clothing to underprivileged children in the San Francisco Bay Area.

“We believe this represents a win-win for all of us,” said Jacqueline Linder, CEO of Neighbor.

“Every review represents a contribution to these children, but it’s also a valuable piece of local wisdom. At the same time, it’s great word-of-mouth marketing for the local businesses.”

Heather Hopkins, Founder and Director of My New Red Shoes, said, “This is a great initiative: local businesses, local people, local kids. I believe our community will step up to the challenge to write 10,000 reviews by August 25th. Since this amount represents nearly 10% of My New Red Shoes’ annual budget, the campaign will make a huge difference in the lives of hundreds of students who will go to school wearing new clothing and a smile.”

About My New Red Shoes

My New Red Shoes is a nonprofit organization that provides brand new school clothing and shoes to underprivileged children in the Bay Area. It was founded by Heather Hopkins after hearing a story from her mother that changed Heather’s life. Growing up in a poor family, Heather’s mother dreaded the first day of school, worried that she would not have anything presentable to wear when she walked through her classroom doors in September. My New Red Shoes is the first 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization focused on providing new school clothing to children throughout Santa Clara and San Mateo counties.

About Neighbor

At Neighbor.com, we capture and organize local wisdom, and make it accessible to everyone. Our wisdom consists of questions and answers posted by our community, along with reviews of local businesses and organizations. We use a unique Q&A format to capture and showcase the special “attributes” that people naturally use in conversation when discussing services, so that others can find the businesses that meet their particular needs. Neighbor is privately held.

For more info and to write a review: Neighbor.com. For charity info: MyNewRedShoes.org.

Business Wire

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THE HOTEL CASABLANCA – World Premiere of Thomas Pasatieri Opera at San Francisco’s Cowell Theater

Singers of the Merola Opera Program debut work August 3rd and 5th

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By Seán Martinfield
Sentinel Fine Arts Critic
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

MEROLA OPERA PROGRAM has announced casting details for the forthcoming World Premiere of Thomas Pasatieri’s “The Hotel Casablanca”, scheduled for two performances on August 3rd and 5th at the Fort Mason Center Cowell Theatre. Joseph Illick will conduct the 17-member chamber orchestra in a production directed and designed by Richard Kagey. The Hotel Casablanca is sponsored by Reid and Peggy Dennis.

“The Hotel Casablanca” will be presented during Merola’s 50th Anniversary Season and is the first world premiere opera ever to be produced by the renowned Merola Opera Program, the nation’s leading summer training program for 29 young professional opera singers, coach accompanists and directors. This year’s program began June 4 and features artists from around the globe.

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TAMARA WAPINSKY, Soprano and TOM CORBEIL, Bass-Baritone

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KENNETH KELLOGG, Bass and ANDREW BIDLACK, Tenor

Following the Pasatieri premiere, the highly anticipated Merola Grand Finale concert will take to the stage of the War Memorial Opera House Aug. 18 with Merola graduate Patrick Summers on the podium leading members of the San Francisco Opera Orchestra. The Grand Finale concert will feature the singers in a program of concert arias and ensemble works spanning a variety of composers from Monteverdi to Sondheim. The annual Grand Finale concert will formally conclude the Merola Opera Program’s Golden Anniversary Season.

“The Hotel Casablanca”, Pasatieri’s 19th opera set to an original libretto by the composer, is a two-act comedy set in the summer heat of Texas 1948, and follows a certain wealthy Texan couple and their attempts to “toughen up” their 25 year-old nephew visiting from New York. Based on the Feydeau play A Flea in Her Ear, Pasatieri’s inventive plot takes place at the mythical Double-T Ranch and the seedy Hotel Casablanca riddled with assorted eccentric guests. The opera is composed for nine principal singers and will be sung in English.

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MEREDITH WOODEND, Mezzo-Soprano and JASON PLOURDE, Baritone

The featured artists are tenor Andrew Bidlack (Charles Carter, nephew of Tom Carter); baritone Jason Plourde (Burton, butler at the Double T Ranch); soprano Tamara Wapinsky (Tallulah Carter, wife of Tom Carter); mezzo-soprano Paula Murrihy (Lucy Perez, Tallulah’s former vaudeville partner); bass-baritone Tom Corbeil (Tom Carter, owner of the Double T Ranch); baritone Nathaniel Hackmann (Raul Perez, bull breeder and husband of Lucy Perez); bass Kenneth Kellogg (Tobias, manager of the Double T Ranch); mezzo-soprano Meredith Woodend (Miss Pooder, proprietor of the Hotel Casablanca); and soprano Jamie-Rose Guarrine (Veronique, a Hotel Casablanca employee).

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JAMIE-ROSE GUARRINE, Soprano and NATHANIEL HACKMANN, Baritone

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THOMAS PASATIERI, Composer and PAULA MURRIHY, Mezzo-Soprano

Pasatieri was born in New York, 1945. He was an accomplished pianist and performer by the age of ten and a composer at age fifteen. As a teenager, he studied with the renowned French teacher, Nadia Boulanger. He entered the Juilliard School at age sixteen and eventually became the school’s first recipient of a doctoral degree. Among his 19 operas are La Divina (1966), Padrevía (1967), Black Widow (1972), The Trial of Mary Lincoln (1972), Signor Deluso (1974), Washington Square (1976), Before Breakfast (1980), Three Sisters (1986), and his best known work, The Seagull (1972), which received its premiere recording in 2003 from Albany Records. Earlier this year, Pasatieri presented the world premiere of another one of his operas, Frau Margot, for the Fort Worth Opera.

In addition to his opera works, Pasatieri has composed numerous chamber pieces, choral works, and hundreds of songs for many of the leading opera singers of the past three decades. Now living in Los Angeles, Pasatieri has been drawn to the film industry. His film orchestrations may be heard in The Good German, Road to Perdition, American Beauty, The Little Mermaid, The Shawshank Redemption, Fried Green Tomatoes, Legends of the Fall and Scent of a Woman.

Conductor Joseph Illick worked with Pasatieri on the recent premiere of Frau Margot at Fort Worth Opera, and Washington Square for Manhattan School of Music. Illick’s credits include Salome for Fort Worth Opera, Un Ballo in Maschera for Lyric Opera of Kansas City, Madama Butterfy for Opera Carolina, and The Mikado for Opera Theatre of St, Louis. Later this season, he will return to Fort Worth for Turandot and Of Mice and Men.

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JOSEPH ILLICK, Conductor

Director and scenic designer Richard Kagey recently directed the premiere of Pasatieri’s Frau Margot. His upcoming engagements include Crazy For You and Lysistrata at the Seagle Music Colony, The Hotel Casablanca for the University of Kentucky, Cold Sassy Tree for Atlanta Opera, Of Mice and Men for Fort Worth Opera, and director of the soon to-be-opened Energy Center for the Performing Arts in Atlanta.

For tickets, call the San Francisco Opera Box Office: 415-864-3330

Seán recommends:
CDLETTER TO WARSAW – Thomas Pasatieri’s song cycle featuring soprano Jane Eaglen, conducted by Gerard Schwarz.
CD THE SEAGULL – Thomas Pasatieri’s opera based on Chekov’s classic play; David Gilbert conducting. The cast includes baritone Raymond Ayers as “Constantine”, soprano Amy Gough as “Arkadina”, soprano Amy Shoremount as “Nina”, and baritone Matthew Worth “Trigorin”.

For your dining pleasure before or after “The Hotel Casablanca”, Seán suggests:
McCormick & Kuleto’s Seafood Restaurant – At Ghirardelli Square, 900 North Point Street. Try the truly operatic Jumbo Shrimp Pomodoro with Garlic, Basil, Chili Flakes, Pomodoro Sauce and Linguine.

Ana Mandara – Modern Vietnamese cuisine at 891 Beach Street. Be sure to include a side order duet of Grilled Japanese Eggplant With Scallion Oil and the Sticky Black Rice .

See Seán’s recent articles:
NEIL SEDAKA and PATTI LUPONE – Summer in The City at Symphony Hall
JOHNNY MATHIS – Gets Misty with San Francisco Symphony
INSIGNIFICANT OTHERS – A Conversation with Composer Jay Kuo
IPHIGÉNIE EN TAURIDE – Everything old is new again at SF Opera
NORMA SHEARER Flick Opens the San Francisco Silent Film Festival
JERSEY BOYS – Earth Angels invade Curran Theatre! Cast #2: Their Eyes Adore You!
JEANETTE MacDONALD – First Lady of “San Francisco”
DER ROSENKAVALIER – A Viennese Bon-Bon At San Francisco Opera
An Interview with PASCAL MOLAT, Principal Dancer of the San Francisco Ballet
DAVID GOCKLEY’S “DON GIOVANNI” – Semper Fi!
SAMSON vs DELILAH at AT&T Park – Can Stadium Survive Biblical Shearing?
SPIDER-MAN 3, An All-American Cinematic Marvel
JOAN of ARC – Dolora Zajick, A Simmering Success!
THE DAMNATION OF FAUST – Absolute Heaven at Davies Symphony Hall

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San Francisco Sentinel’s Fine Arts Critic Seán Martinfield is a native San Franciscan. He is a Theatre Arts Graduate from San Francisco State University, a professional singer, and well-known private vocal coach to Bay Area actors and singers of all ages and persuasions. His clients have appeared in Broadway National Tours including Wicked, Aïda, Miss Saigon, Rent, Bye Bye Birdie, in theatres and cabarets throughout the Bay Area, and are regularly featured in major City events including Diva Fest, Gay Pride, and Halloween In The Castro. As an Internet consultant in vocal development and audition preparation he has published thousands of responses to those seeking his advice concerning singing techniques, professional and academic auditions, and careers in the Performing Arts. Ask him a question on AllExperts.com . If you would like to build up your vocal performance chops and participate in the Bay Area’s rich theatrical scene, e-mail him at: seanmartinfield@att.net.

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PESKIN UNITES LABOR BEHIND MUNI REFORM CHARTER AMENDMENT

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Supervisor Aaron Peskin, left, leads announcement of labor support with San Francisco Labor Council Executive Director Tim Paulson, center, and San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom.
PHOTOS BY BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

BY PAT MURPHY
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

San Francisco labor leaders Monday endorsed a proposal to reform Muni by giving its governing Metropolitican Transit Agency (MTA) Commission more autonomy.

Supervisor Aaron Peskin, president of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors and author of the Charter Amendment ballot measure, made the 2:50 p.m. announcement with Mayor Gavin in a City Hall International Room press conference.

Although the announcement was scheduled for 2:30 p.m., Peskin conducted shuttle diplomacy between labor leaders and the Mayor’s Office until the press conference began.

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Peskin reported agreement came through unparalled cooperation.

“This has truly been the result of unparalled cooperation between the house of labor, the Board of Supervisors, and the Mayor’s Office aimed at fundamental reform of the most vital functions that a city can provide. That, of course, is smooth delivery of transportation.

“I want to thank Nat Ford (MTA executive director) and the (MTA) commissioners that are gathered here, but most importantly to thank the representatives of all of the unions that make Muni work every single day.

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“They’re all here — the Transportation Workers Union, the Service Employees International Union, the Machinists, the MEA, the International Federation of Professional Technical Engineers Local 21. All of them have entered now into several weeks of good faith negotiations.

“We are here today to announce to you that we do have an agreement,” stated Peskin.

The measure, which the Board of Supervisors must approve for placement on the November ballot, will provide more accountability and City revenues, the mayor added.

“That is another big component of this initiative,” Newsom stated.

“It provides more revenue. It provides more accountability and with that accountability comes more responsibility that’s now placed in the hands of the MTA.

“I think it’s going to help support the reform efforts… and support Nat Ford and his team that have come together that are doing good work.”

Newsom looked toward the November election.

“I’m very hopeful that the Board will pass it and very encouraged that with this kind of momentum that we can get the kind of votes that we need this November to pass it,” Newsom observed.

The Board of Supervisors will vote on ballot placement July 31, Peskin said.

Collaboration made agreement possible, noted labor leader Tim Paulson.

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Tim Paulson, left, and Mayor Newsom finalize the deal.

“We are the workers,” Paulson began, “we are the workers who are in this room who actually perform the jobs at Muni that make the buses run on time.

“For us to be able to sit down in a proactive way, to be part of the team to make sure that we are going to move forward so that San Francisco is an even better transportation City, we’re going to work even harder to do that.”

Early skepticism by drivers turned to process involvement, their union president reported.

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Transport Workers Union Local 250-A President Irwin Lum, left, with MTA Executive Director Nat Ford.

“I think that the issue is we feel on behalf of the operators that we are part of the solution in trying to correct some of the problems,” Lum stated.

“That’s why we stayed in the process to try to change the legislation — that we have a say in what’s going on and I think the majority of our people we concerned about making Muni the number one system and making it accountable to the public.”

Months long good faith negotiation culminated in measure final version, Peskin observed.

“I think everybody really came to the conclusion that we’re all really doing this in good faith and that we’re all part of the solution,” assessed Peskin.

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PAT MURPHY
Sentinel Editor & Publisher
In his youth, Pat Murphy worked as a General Assignment reporter for the Richmond Independent, the Berkeley Daily Gazette, and the San Francisco Chronicle. He served as Managing Editor of the St. Albans (Vermont) Daily Messenger at age 21. Murphy also launched ValPak couponing in San Francisco, as the company’s first San Francisco franchise owner. He walked the bricks, developing ad strategy for a broad range of restaurants and merchants. Pat knows what works and what doesn’t work. His writing skill has been employed by marketing agencies, including Don Solem & Associates. He has covered San Francisco governance for the past ten years. Pat scribes an offbeat view of the human family through Believe It or What.

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BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Bill Wilson is a veteran freelance photographer whose work is published by San Francisco and East Bay media. Bill embraced photography at the age of eight. In recent years, his photos capture historic record of the San Francisco LGBT community in the Bay Area Reporter (BAR). Bill has contributed to the Sentinel for the past three years.

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STREET VIOLENCE: Two shootings – One shot dead in Visitacion Valley, no arrests – Tourists treated to collapse of midday shooting victim, no arrests

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Officers are investigating the second shooting to occur on Monday, a San Francisco police dispatcher said this morning.

Around 11:49 p.m. police received reports of gunshots on the 100 block of Blythdale Avenue in the Visitacion Valley neighborhood, according to a dispatcher. Responding officers found a victim suffering gunshot wounds. He was pronounced dead at the scene.

There are no suspects in custody at this time, a dispatcher said.

The first shooting, which was reported at about 2:10 p.m., occurred a few feet from Market Street, Sgt. Steve Mannina said. He was shot at Turk and Mason streets.

The man, whose identity was not released, was transported to San Francisco General Hospital with non-life threatening injuries, police Sgt. Steve Mannina said.

A silver sedan pulled up to a Turk Street curb. The victim approached the sedan and then broke away from it. Shots were fired and the victim went east on Market Street, Mannina said.

Before he made it to Fifth Street, onlookers assisted him until paramedics arrived, Mannina said.

The suspects fled westbound on Turk Street.

Bay City News

See Related STREET VIOLENCE Stories

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July 24 Videos of The Day – HILLARY’S VILLAGE PEOPLE – REAL DOWNTOWN INTERESTS – THE DREAM LIVES – July 24 Photos of The Day – MAY PELOSI FIND IT IN HER BREAST TO END THE WAR – Babies born today will be quick tempered – Live radar and weather forecast

July 24 Videos of The Day
HILLARY’S VILLAGE PEOPLE

REAL DOWNTOWN INTERESTS

THE DREAM LIVES

July 24 Photos of The Day
MAY PELOSI FIND IT IN HER BREAST TO END THE WAR
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The women of Code Pink and Breasts Not Bombs yesterday ponied up tit for tat in dialogue with Speaker Pelosi on ending the Iraq War, first before the San Francisco Federal Building on Golden Gate Avenue, then bouncing down to Hillary Clinton for President Headquarters on Howard Street to implore support.
PHOTOS BY MARK GRISSOM

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JULY 24 BIRTHDAY LORE
Everything you do is done with intensity. You are emotional, quick-tempered, and positive in your dates. Practice self-control! You are a fond parent, kind and sympathetic, and love your family.

ADVICE FOR JULY 24
To prevent moss from forming on a roof, mix up a solution of 2 capfuls of bleach and 1 gallon of water. Apply it to the shingles with a sponge.

JULY 24 WORD OF THE DAY
Indian Summer. Defintion: A period of warm weather following a cold spell or a hard frost, Indian summer can occur between St. Martin’s Day (November 11) and November 20. Although there are differing dates for its occurrence, for more than 200 years the Almanac has adhered to the saying “If All Saints’ brings out winter, St. Martin’s brings out Indian summer.” As for the origin of the term, some say it comes from the early Native Americans, who believed that the condition was caused by a warm wind sent from the court of their southwestern god, Cautantowwit.

JULY 24 IN HISTORY
Tennessee readmitted to Union after Civil War, 186g. Wahluke, Washington, tied a record high temperature of 118 degrees F, 1928.

REALTIME SAN FRANCISCO WEATHER
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Tuesday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, then gradually becoming mostly sunny, with a high near 68. West wind between 6 and 13 mph.

Tuesday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, increasing clouds, with a low around 58. West wind between 9 and 13 mph.

Wednesday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, cloudy through mid morning, then gradual clearing, with a high near 69. West southwest wind between 9 and 13 mph.

Wednesday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 58. West southwest wind between 7 and 13 mph.

Thursday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 70.

Thursday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 58.

Friday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 72.

Friday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 57.

Saturday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 71.

Saturday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 56.

Sunday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 68.

Sunday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a low around 57.

Monday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 70.

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LUCKY GIANTS FANS attending Barry Bonds record setting homerun game to receive high quality commemorative pin – Half of Tuesday game proceeds donated to Project Homeless Connect

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PHOTOS BY BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

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San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom, seen earlier suited up for the All Star Game, will join formerly homeless Howard Cobbins and Bank of America Vice President Tim Geraghty in throwing out the first ball at Tuesday’s Project Homeless Connect Night game. From left in file photo, are team owner Peter Magowan, Giants pitcher Barry Zito, Newsom, and Willie Mays.

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San Francisco Giant Barry Bonds could hit his record-breaking 756th homerun this week, but at Tuesday night’s game baseball fans will see the Giants play to help the homeless.

Tuesday’s Giants game will host the second annual Project Homeless Connect Night, both a fundraiser for and celebration of support for the homeless.

A commemorative, lapel-style pin would be handed out to fans attending the game in which Bonds sets a new homerun record. The pin will be of finer quality than the numbered pins that have been provided to game-goers since the athlete blasted homerun 750.

If Bonds hits homerun 756 on the road, the pins will be handed out at the next home game.

Half of ticket sales from Tuesday night’s game will be donated to Project Homeless Connect, a combination of health service agencies, city officials, businesses and non-profit sectors that collaborate to provide food, clothing, shelter and other necessities to the homeless.

“Project Homeless Connect Night is a time to acknowledge the program’s accomplishments and recognize the clients who have successfully overcome homelessness,” Mayor Gavin Newsom said in a statement.

Tim Geraghty, senior Vice President of Bank of America, and Howard Cobbins, a former client of Project Homeless Connect, will join Newsom at home plate at 6:20 p.m. for the opening ceremony.

Together Newsom, Geraghty and Cobbins will throw the first pitch of the night.

The Giants will play the Atlanta Braves at 7:15 p.m. at AT&T Park on Tuesday. Tickets sold out on Friday.

Project Homeless Connect was founded in 2004 to offer the city’s homeless shelter, employment opportunities, food and clothing.

Over 100 cities around the world have modeled homeless organizations after Project Homeless Connect, combining non-profit agencies and businesses with community volunteers.

Bay City News

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BILL WILSON
Sentinel Photographer
Bill Wilson is a veteran freelance photographer whose work is published by San Francisco and Bay Area media. Bill embraced photography at the age of eight. In recent years, his photos capture historic record of the San Francisco LGBT community in the Bay Area Reporter (BAR). Bill has contributed to the Sentinel for the past three years.

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BUSINESS DEMANDS real-time data in seconds, not hours

GoldenGate Software Inc. today announced the results of a recent survey, “Live Reporting in the Emerging Real – Time Enterprise,” produced by Unisphere Research in cooperation with GoldenGate Software and the Oracle Applications Users Group (OAUG).

The results point to a growing demand for companies to report on data coming out of their applications in real time — a matter of seconds — not weeks or even hours. Across industries, the survey finds that having the ability to report on the freshest possible data about the business provides a competitive advantage.

The survey was designed to measure the scope and adoption of reporting technologies. More than a third of organizations surveyed require reporting of some data on a real-time or “live” basis. According to respondents, one of the challenges with data warehousing is that it often relies on batch-oriented ETL processes for data acquisition, which makes it virtually impossible to provide real-time reporting. As a result, reports are typically run against live production systems, which creates performance issues.

Of the surveyed group, 60 percent of organizations reported suffering from server performance degradation as a result of end users running reports against live production environments. The takeaway — businesses need their reports to run at an optimal level and against real-time data without affecting their database and ultimately their business. In order to gain a competitive advantage, businesses need real-time data to act upon and affect change now — not days or weeks later.

“With increased demand for a real-time view of the business, the survey findings reflect the rapid adoption of live reporting tools that can affect business change as it happens— with 53 percent of respondents agreeing they cannot work with data that is more than one hour old for their key applications,” said Sami Akbay, vice president of marketing at GoldenGate Software.

“To run reports against the freshest data possible, batch processing simply won’t suffice. As businesses grow and change over time, real-time data is becoming mission-critical to enabling more flexible reporting, improved performance and a competitive edge.”

To request an executive summary of the survey, “Live Reporting in the Emerging Real-Time Enterprise,” email tami@kulesapr.com.

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July 23 Videos of The Day – A TANGLED TANGO – HOW AMERICANS AND BRITS DIFFER – WHAT FUN – Babies born today will need understanding from mates – Live radar and weather forecast

July 23 Videos of The Day
A TANGLED TANGO

HOW AMERICANS AND BRITS DIFFER

WHAT FUN

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JULY 23 BIRTHDAY LORE
You are energetic, vivacious, and rather talkative; are very fond of gaiety and social life; and like to have an active part in anything you undertake. You are not demonstrative in your love and require affection and understanding from your mate.

ADVICE FOR JULY 23
Leos tend to be generous, faithful, creative, and broad-minded.

JULY 23 WORD OF THE DAY
Argy-bargy. Defintion: A verbal dispute; a wrangling argument.

JULY 23 IN HISTORY
Died: Ulysses S. Grant (18th U.S. president), 1885. Sheridan, Wyoming, got drenched by 4.41 inches of rain, which washed away some railroad tracks, 1923.

REALTIME SAN FRANCISCO WEATHER
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Monday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, then gradually becoming mostly sunny, with a high near 69. West wind between 6 and 13 mph.

Monday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly clear, with a low around 57. West wind between 6 and 13 mph.

Tuesday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, mostly sunny, with a high near 68. West wind between 6 and 14 mph.

Tuesday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 57. West wind between 9 and 14 mph.

Wednesday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 67.

Wednesday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 57.

Thursday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 69.

Thursday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 56.

Friday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 71.

Friday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 56.

Saturday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 69.

Saturday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 56.

Sunday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 69.

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SAN FRANCISCO HOLOCAUST EDUCATION RESOURCES MERGE

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Two San Francisco Holocaust education resources will become one, the organizations announced this month.

The Holocaust Center of Northern California and the Bay Area Holocaust Oral History Project will unify, creating a single unified Bay Area resource for Holocaust education and remembrance known as the Holocaust Center of Northern California.

“By combining our resources and efforts, we will be more effective in teaching the universal lessons of the Holocaust. We will reach more classrooms, students and the general public with educational and cultural programs that show the consequences of hate and indifference,” said Dr. Steven H. Sloan, president of the new institution.

Both organizations operated side by side for almost 30-years in the Bay Area. With the Holocaust Center of Northern California recognizing the importance of bringing survivors into classrooms to tell their stories to students.

The Holocaust Center will house more than 1,700 oral testimonies of local residents who were eyewitnesses and survivors of the Holocaust. The video and audio testimonies will be available for viewing at the Holocaust Center.

“Merging our resources gives us the opportunity to integrate first-hand testimonies into extensive educational offerings. This is an important step in ensuring that our treasured collection of personal stories will have increased access, use and impact,” said Miriam Zimmerman, former Oral History Project board president.

The new Holocaust Center will be an even larger organization with more resources that may be used to tech the consequences of racism, hatred and indifference while preserving and disseminating historical information, the center announced.

The Holocaust Center of Northern California is located at 121 Steuart St. in San Francisco and is open to the public Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is free.

Bay City News

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INSIGNIFICANT OTHERS – A Conversation with the Composer, Lyricist and Author – Jay Kuo

Leading lady Erin Diamantides says the musical is “A blast!”

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By Seán Martinfield
Sentinel Fine Arts Critic
Copyright © 2007 San Francisco Sentinel

I met with composer and librettist Jay Kuo at the Castro District’s very significant indoor/outdoor CAFÉ FLORE. Leading lady Erin Diamantides joined us as well. It was a totally other summer day in San Francisco – temperatures in the mid 70s and a crystal clear sky. In the slightly breezy air – the buzz of another book-signing by Armistead Maupin for his just released MICHAEL TOLLIVER LIVES. The title of Jay’s musical, INSIGNIFICANT OTHERS, refers back to Maupin and is an appropriate homage to him. I saw the show in October 2005 at the Jon Sims Center. At that point it was still being work-shopped, but enthusiastically presented to an audience which included potential investors. I had known Jon Sims – founder of the San Francisco Gay Freedom Day Marching Band and Twirling Corps. In fact, we had begun discussing a full production of THE MUSIC MAN. It was my Opera House debut as “Marian” – in harmony with SF Gay Men’s Chorus barbershop quartet, The Lollipop Guild – which convinced Mr. Sims that our collaboration would prove successful. No doubt, he was fascinated by my high notes and seeming transformation in a haute couture turquoise gown. Erin Diamantides as the very-contemporary “Jeannine” of INSIGNIFICANT OTHERS – is as lovely as any composer/producer could possibly hope for. She has the most longevity of any actor in the show, having performed in the first version at the Jon Sims Center, a re-staging at New Conservatory Theatre Center, and now at Yerba Buena Zeum Theater .

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ERIN DIAMANTIDES

I had to ask her the obvious question, “What’s it like to live with Insignificant Others all that time?”

“When we might get under par,” she responded, “new things come up and you discover more about your character. You’re building your character and finding new ways to flesh it out.

As a professional vocal coach, one of the questions I am constantly asked is, “What should I sing for my audition?” When a new composer/author posts an audition notice for a new show, singers and actors are always concerned about presenting the right monologue and song to reflect the nature of the show and the style of the music. When the composer does not have a previously recorded “concept album” or other recordings or published music available, the potential cast member gets very anxious. In this case, Jay had selected five songs for the audition. Erin was relieved at that and – compared to other audition experiences – very impressed by how organized Jay had been with the audition process. She chose “Think of Me” from PHANTOM OF THE OPERA .

“That was my ballad. And then for my up-tempo I did “All That Jazz” from CHICAGO. Jay had us work with the pianist. We matched pitches, changed the dynamics – starting silent and then growing on the note.”

Many un-trained singers go to a musical audition never thinking they will be tested on their musical skills. The general notion is that the production team is looking rather than listening for a particular something. As the new composer on the block, Jay wanted to know about their musical training. He was listening for something. “So I had them do some tricky interval matching. For example, playing C and then asking them to sing an interval of a third above, a third below.”

Jay had very specific ideas in mind about the kinds of voices he needed. “In some cases I wanted a lyrical sound, with others a more legitimate sound or a more pop sound. I wanted to find those perfect matches. We also needed some belters. There were some people who were double-threats on that level.”

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INSIGNIFICANT OTHERS – at the Zeum Theater

I asked Jay for a SENTINEL “exclusive”.

“This is new! We are in the process of taking the show outside of San Francisco to New York. It’s sort-of been a nebulous plan, but now we’ve actually just confirmed the last pledge for my half of the deal. Clearly, this is now the next step for the show – to try New York City and see how it does. A full union cast, a four-piece band, in a 199-seat theatre so as to abide by the rules for an “Off-Broadway” production. One of the producers we’ve been talking to suggested The Zipper; there’s a space in the Village where Gutenberg! The Musical! is playing. We’re obviously going to go where the demographics are good for us. It depends on what spaces are available and who we wind up talking with.”

Among those interested parties is the recently re-migrated Randy Adams who for the past 21 years served as the Managing Director for Palo Alto’s TheatreWorks . He and partner Sue Frost of Goodspeed Musicals in Connecticut have created Junkyard Dog Productions – an organization designed to cultivate and nurture new works until they are production-ready.

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LILLIAN ASKEW and KEVIN MALDARELLI

“Those two powerhouse musical theatre developers” says the sparkling Mr. Kuo, “are taking shows they had in development to New York. So, to be in that league now is very exciting.”

Erin is likewise excited. “I’ll go as far as they will take me. I’m thrilled to still be a part of it and I’m really honored they wanted to take me this far. Jay asked me if I would be willing to go to New York. It was – hands down – NOT a question!”

The recent documentary, ShowBusiness – The Road To Broadway, follows the process of composing a musical to its actual mounting in a legitimate Broadway theatre. Prominently featured is the 2004 Tony Award winner for Best Musical, AVENUE Q, and its triple-winning composer/author team of Robert Lopez, Jeff Marx and Jeff Whitty. Bearing in mind the first National Tour is booked into San Francisco’s ORPHEUM THEATRE August 7th through September 2nd, I asked Jay where INSIGNIFICANT OTHERS sits on the big comparative calendar.

“I saw the film with my director George Quick and my choreographer David Garcia. We were riveted the entire time. Avenue Q took four years to get to Broadway. A lot of people said that it was not a Broadway show it’s an Off-Broadway show because it has puppets, you need a smaller space, etc. We are in our second year now. I think we have a different path than trying to get this show to Broadway. If we have a successful Off-Broadway run, I would like to bring it back to San Francisco and put it down permanently – like a “Beach Blanket Babylon”. INSIGNIFICANT OTHERS is really about San Francisco and the people who live here. I think – in view of marketing and producing it long term – if this becomes the next show that everyone has to see when they’re here, then I will feel it has found its home. One of the reasons we want to do it Off-Broadway is to get that legitimacy – because I have plans for other New York shows and it would be nice to step in with a success. Another reason is to see if it plays well outside of San Francisco. The third reason is to get it into the license books so that one day community theatres can perform this show. It can be done on a shoe-string budget. We did it successfully last year with NO budget!”

Part of every investment dollar goes toward adapting a show to the requirements and variations of the available performance space. The stage of The Zeum varies from convention in that it is very wide and narrow. One of the main concerns of the ISO production team was to balance the sound of the band. The presentations at the Jon Sims Center and NCTC had utilized pre-recorded music. At the Zeum, a not-so-insignificant chunk of change is going toward a professional sound system. Even if it’s a small ensemble, a pop musical needs a pop drummer and very often the drummer’s kit needs to be contained. Everyone – including fellow musicians, the singers, investors and ticket holders – knows the enthusiasm of any percussion section and the overwhelming consequences when a bombardment of sound is re-amplified through a nearby mic on a nearby performer. Screaming “Turn that down” seldom works – but “walling” around the drummer will. As acoustic energies are absorbed and contained, the desired effects are re-inforced.

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SARAH FARRELL (as Margaret) – views her plumbing

“I would like to see INSIGNIFICANT OTHERS played in colleges across the country because there are enough young people in their early twenties moving to a new place and I think it resonates well. I don’t think high school students would get it as much. Places like New York or San Francisco – where they tap into musical theatre – high school kids will love this show. Eighty per cent of the people who see it are under 30. I’m writing for one generation younger than me – as someone who is a little bit older and wiser, but who remembers very clearly what it was like.”

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Having not forgotten any of IT myself, I posed the challenge, “So what do you notice repeating – something you went through – that you are writing about today?”

Jay has an infectious smile. “Well, certainly Love springs eternal in San Francisco! You live here. The people are so vibrant. On days like this, you fall in love. Because some are in a new place, they are looking for connections. I see that in a lot of my friends who have moved here recently. They’re a little lost, they want to connect with people. That initial connection might be easy, but it gets tricky because nothing is very straight forward. What happens in INSIGNIFICANT OTHERS is that five friends who live in Ohio come out with very preconceived notions of what San Francisco will be like.”

“When you take the show to New York, are you anticipating changes in the script? Or is it more about a chunk of San Francisco that finds itself in a pocket in New York?”

“It’s more the latter. I think there’s an affinity with the person on the left in New York and the liberal values found here in San Francisco. For people living in Chelsea or Manhattan – who have visited here, who have friends out here – it’s a place they like. Maybe it’s a little bit too regional for them in New York. The question we explore is – will people be snobby in New York and not want to see a show about San Francisco? Or will they say, like when Armistead Maupin came out with his book, “This is fantastic! This is charming / it’s wonderful / I’ve always wanted to know more about this place!”

“I still see it as a learning experience”, says Jay. “If you had asked me six months ago, I would have said – Oh, this is it, this is the Biggie! Our budget is 150-grand and that’s only a fourth of what we’re doing in New York. I’ve got the Zeum and it’s a perfect space for this show.”

“This show is a blast!” says Erin. “The songs have a lot of range. There are several numbers where I get to wail my brains out and others where I sing more lyrical and hit my High A. It’s fun to be able to have that and not be stuck with just one voice-type. Being miked helps make things easier for longevity sake and makes the songs more intimate. I can be more connected with the audience.”

“The great thing about having worked with Erin,” says Jay, “is that when I was writing HOMELAND [Jay's newest musical, also directed by George Quick] we already knew we were casting her as Eleanor, a leftist activist. I knew what she was capable of and wrote the part with her in mind. That is a luxury! We are working on a new piece called “All In”. I have some ideas about how George and I will be casting that show. Again, I have the luxury of being able to write that show with someone else’s voice in mind. I need to write a very commercial show because I need to pay some bills. So, “All In” is being written for Vegas. It’s a show about poker. It’s a show straight men will want to come see with their girlfriends.”

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STARBUCKS – Bobby Bruce, Andrew Sa, and Alex Rodriguez

Jay is a professional lawyer turned musical composer / producer. While workshopping ISO at the Jon Sims Center, he was trying a case in Los Angeles. He would fly a red-eye out in the evening to LA, do a case in the morning, come back to the office to organize his papers and statements, rush up for rehearsals between 6:00 and 9:30, and then leave a bit early so he could catch his flight back down to LA and argue the case.

“That went on for several weeks in a row. I can’t quit doing theatre – we open in six weeks. I’m thinking – what are we going to do? So, I went to some backers and said ‘I need $100,000.00 to survive this next year, to get it to the next level, to pay my mortgage, and have enough in reserve so that if it doesn’t work out I can figure something else. I went to people and asked for a $10,000 to $20,000 investment. It only took two weeks. In fact, we have a waiting list. People really like this show and they believe it’s going to go somewhere. That became a pivotal point for me. I was also up for Partner at my law firm. I had to decide whether I was going to give up the golden ring. There was a lot of drama happening at work at the same time. It was very dispiriting at the time. I decided – even with another job – I didn’t want to keep doing it. And why do it if I can raise money and pay myself to do what I love? I discovered I can do three things to help the career. One, is that I can write quickly. I can market aggressively. I’m not afraid of being told I suck or that I’m being over-bearing. And the third is that – somehow – people are ok giving me money. I always tell them I need their money to do this and in all likelihood you’re not going to see your money again – this is Theatre! You have to be OK with the $20,000 you put in and I won’t take money from anybody who’s going to cry about it later. We just closed another round of $130,000 to back ISO in this production. I’m glad I did the lawyer-thing first. I can negotiate with unions, I have contracts with all the people who work with me. We’re very serious about what we’re doing. I’m going to do everything I can to make this a success.”

Jay wants to be self-sustaining, to pay the bills. He wants the show to touch everybody that sees it. The place for that to happen seems to be the small theatre.

“I don’t see it as a big Broadway show. How about giving me a Club Fugazi? San Francisco doesn’t have enough small theaters. San Francisco is becoming known as the place where great theatre is originating, people across the country are seeing us as the place to start something. The people of San Francisco want to participate in the organic process of creating. We are a creative people, a thoughtful people, innovation is happening here. You don’t have to start in New York. You don’t have to be in New York. Because of the budget, we are a non-union show. Everyone in the cast is 25 and under. We are giving local actors opportunity.”

Jay Kuo is my kind of guy. INSIGNIFICANT OTHERS may prove to be your kind of show.

For more information, to listen to the score and to order tickets, click here: INSIGNIFICANT OTHERS

Read Seán’s recent articles:
NORMA SHEARER Flick Opens the San Francisco Silent Film Festival
JOHNNY MATHIS – Gets Misty with San Francisco Symphony
IPHIGÉNIE EN TAURIDE –Everything old is new again at SF Opera
NEIL SEDAKA and PATTI LUPONE – Summer in The City at Symphony Hall
DAVID GOCKLEY’S “DON GIOVANNI” – Semper Fi!
NAN KEMPNER – de Young Museum Presents Couture Collection of Fashion Goddess
JERSEY BOYS – Earth Angels invade Curran Theatre! Cast #2: Their Eyes Adore You!
HIROSHI SUGIMOTO – Retrospective of photographer’s work at the de Young Museum, July 7th – September 23rd
JEANETTE MacDONALD – First Lady of “San Francisco”
DER ROSENKAVALIER – A Viennese Bon-Bon At San Francisco Opera
SPIDER-MAN 3, An All-American Cinematic Marvel
SAMSON vs DELILAH at AT&T Park – Can Stadium Survive Biblical Shearing?
LA VIE EN ROSE (La Môme) – Biography of Edith Piaf – A Sensation at the 50th San Francisco International Film Festival
An Interview with PASCAL MOLAT – Principal Soloist, San Francisco Ballet

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San Francisco Sentinel’s Fine Arts Critic Seán Martinfield is a native San Franciscan. He is a Theatre Arts Graduate from San Francisco State University, a professional singer, and well-known private vocal coach to Bay Area actors and singers of all ages and persuasions. His clients have appeared in Broadway National Tours including Wicked, Aïda, Miss Saigon, Rent, Bye Bye Birdie, in theatres and cabarets throughout the Bay Area, and are regularly featured in major City events including Diva Fest, Gay Pride, and Halloween In The Castro. As an Internet consultant in vocal development and audition preparation he has published thousands of responses to those seeking his advice concerning singing techniques, professional and academic auditions, and careers in the Performing Arts. Ask him a question on AllExperts.com . If you would like to build up your vocal performance chops and participate in the Bay Area’s rich theatrical scene, e-mail him at: seanmartinfield@att.net.

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TAMMY FAYE BAKKER a premier 20th Century evangelist

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Tammy Faye Bakker Mesner
TammyFaye.com Photo

BY ALLEN WHITE

Tammy Faye Bakker has died. She was 65 and news reports say she was down to 65 pounds when she last appeared on Larry King Live.

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Long time friend friend Mary Anna with evangelist during chemotherapy

In my life I’ve crossed paths with some very interesting men and women who pride themselves as being representatives of God.

Some of them tried real hard and just couldn’t really represent much of anything, especially as it relates to spiritual ascendancy. Seeing Fred Phelps from Wichita, Kansas on television is one thing. Right there in front of you is quite another.

Both Dr. Billy Graham and Pope John Paul II left me with the feeling I was in the presence of individuals who were pastors to the world.

I wish I had been in the same room, just once, with Tammy Faye Bakker. I truly liked this woman. I believe she tried to meet a very high standard.

In her struggles I have to believe she felt the sting, the pain and the cruelty of the church like very few others. The agenda of hate practiced by weirdo Phelps doesn’t even merit dignifying when compared to the vicious, mean, venom we saw spewing from Jerry Falwell as he tried to play God during the worst days for Jim and Tammy Faye.

There is a reason why so many detest the Christian church in America today. More than a few formed their impressions of Christianity as they watched Falwell become the personification of theological bully.

I also believe there was a bond, a special relationship she shared with her husband, Jim Bakker. No matter what they write these next few days, no matter what those who speculate might say….I say don’t believe anything that diminishes that relationship. I bet they both cared for each other more than we shall ever know.

I have been honored to know the son and some of the closest of friends to Aimee Semple McPherson. So many hours I remember being with Kathryn Kuhlman in the CBS studios on Beverly Blvd in Los Angeles. Today I treat each moment with Bishop Yvette Flunder as a sacred time. Today, wherever they all might be, I’m sure they would all be enthusiastically embracing Tammy Faye Bakker with their individual versions of “Right On!”

Tammy Faye Bakker had a unique quality which was at the core of each of these women. Like Tammy Faye, these women, Sister Aimee, Miss Kuhlman and Bishop Flunder never, at least in public, allowed their lives to be dominated by hate. These women all experienced the sharp daggers fashioned for their individual destruction. All understood how to use anger. Yet, all refused to allow their anger to be transformed into hate.

Like these special women, Tammy Faye shared another quality. I think she knew how to have fun, to enjoy life and she understood how her exuberance and enthusiasm could light up rooms, auditoriums and all that were within her presence.

No doubt many will have a field day ridiculing and tearing apart her life, her memory and what we should celebrate as Tammy Faye Bakker. I’m also certain the worst of it all will come from within the Christian Church. It certainly won’t be the first time.

This time, I believe, they will be wrong. This time I hope caring people will direct their thoughts to a very unique woman who developed and allowed us to share the strongest of spiritual forces.

What possibly best reflects her is to say:

“Tammy Faye Bakker was a premier Christian evangelist of the 20th Century.”

For whatever her faults, this woman lived a life which radiated Christianity at its finest.

And what about the makeup!!! Tammy Faye Bakker absolutely used her face with a creativity which rivaled Michelangelo’s use of the Sistine Chapel.

Yes, I wish I had been lucky enough to meet Tammy Faye…..a very special lady who understood the message of Christianity was for each of us to understand we, too, each of us, are also very special.

Allen White is a San Francisco writer.

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July 22 Videos of The Day – THAT MAN CAN’T HELP IT – SFO LOW-FARE AIRLINE REGULATION – TAKE A WALK, WOMAN – Babies born today will be generous – Live radar and weather forecast

July 22 Videos of The Day
THAT MAN CAN’T HELP IT

SFO LOW-FARE AIRLINE REGULATION

TAKE A WALK, WOMAN

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JULY 22 BIRTHDAY LORE
You have a happy and even disposition and should marry young, preferably one with an emotional complement to your quiet temperament. You are versatile and resourceful and have a keen, penetrating mind. You are friendly, appreciate the good in others, and are fair and generous in every way.

ADVICE FOR JULY 22
Nail an evergreen branch to new rafters to bring good luck. An empty hornets’ nest, hung high, also will bring good luck to any age house.

JULY 22 WORD OF THE DAY
Lenticular Cloud. Defintion: Lenticular clouds are only seen around mountains. These strange clouds are easy to spot, because they look like flying saucers or a stack of pancakes. Their most interesting characteristic is that they don’t move. Winds blow right through them, while other clouds are swept away.

JULY 22 IN HISTORY
Born: William Archibald Spooner (known for verbal inversions called “spoonerisms”), 1844, Barrow, Alaska, where the average annual precipitation is 4.75 inches, received 1.38 inches in 24 hours, 1987.

REALTIME SAN FRANCISCO WEATHER
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Sunday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, cloudy through mid morning, then gradual clearing, with a high near 69. West wind between 5 and 14 mph.

Sunday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, increasing clouds, with a low around 58. West southwest wind between 5 and 14 mph.

Monday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, then gradually becoming mostly sunny, with a high near 70. West southwest wind between 5 and 11 mph.

Monday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 56. West wind between 8 and 11 mph.

Tuesday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 69.

Tuesday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 56.

Wednesday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, partly cloudy, with a high near 67.

Wednesday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 57.

Thursday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a high near 68.

Thursday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 57.

Friday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a high near 68.

Friday Night: Patchy fog after 11pm. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low around 56.

Saturday: Patchy fog before 11am. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a high near 69.

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