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FIrst Openly Gay Bishop Rt. Rev. Otis Charles of San Francisco Dies April 24, 1926 – December 26, 2013

The Rt. Rev. Otis Charles, born April 24, 1926 in Norristown, Pennsylvania, died peacefully on December 26, 2013 at San Francisco’s Coming Home Hospice following a brief illness.  Charles was with family at his bedside at the time of his death.

Charles was the eighth bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Utah. Soon after his retirement in 1993 he came out as an openly gay man, making him the first openly gay bishop of any Christian denomination in history. Soon after he and his wife divorced. He relocated to San Francisco, where he helped to found Oasis California, the LGBT Ministry of the Episcopal Diocese of California. which seeks to open dialogue between LGBT communities and the congregations in which they worship.

Originally from New Jersey, he served first as a priest in Washington, Connecticut. From 1968 until 1982 he was a member of the Standing Liturgical Commission of the Episcopal Church, which developed the 1979 edition of the Book of Common Prayer. In 1971, he was elected Bishop of Utah. He was active in the peace movement, and opposed Nevada and Utah being launching sites for the MX missile. In the >House of Bishops, Charles was chair of the Prayer Book Committee and a member of the Bishops’ Committee on Racism. Charles became Dean of the Episcopal Divinity School in 1985. Charles also has significant academic achievements, including a Doctorate of Divinity, and a Doctorate of Sacred Theology.

Following his coming out, Charles retained his voting seat in the 300-plus member House of Bishops. Before and following his announcement, he was an active and forceful advocate on behalf of LGBT communities. In 1979, Charles was one of 17 dissenting bishops when the Episcopal Church’s General Convention stated that practicing homosexual clergy were prohibited from ordination  – a decision that continues to generate controversy to this day.  In 1999, Charles was arrested and led away in handcuffs for his civil disobedience at the Church’s General Convention in Denver, Colorado during a protest against what demonstrators described as the Church’s long history of oppression against lesbian and gay peoples.

Charles married Dr. Felipe Sanchez-Paris on September 29, 2008. Sanchez-Paris died on July 31 of this year.  The two appear in the documentary film Love Free or Die, testifying about a resolution directing the Episcopal Church to create a provisional rite for the blessing of same-gender relationships at its General Convention in Anaheim, California, in 2009.

Charles is survived by his first spouse, five children, 10 grandchildren, four great-grandchildren, four children of Sanchez-Paris and his San Francisco family.

A memorial service and celebration of the life of Otis Charles will be held at on Saturday, January 11, 2pm at San Francisco’s St. Gregory of Nyssa Episcopal Church (500 De Haro Street).

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San Francisco Christmas Eve Day Toy Drive for Children at Handlery Hotel by Firefighters is a Success

 

San Francisco Firefighters Union Local 798 held a successful toy drive to make sure no child went without a toy in San Francisco this Christmas, thanks to Jon Handlery and his family’s landmark San Francisco hotel.

 

Dressed as Santa Claus, San Francisco Firefighter Bob Cuff and costumed characters accompanied by off-duty firefighters were in front of the Handlery Union Square Hotel, 351 Geary (between Powell and Mason), San Francisco from 9 a.m. to midnight on Christmas Eve day.

 

Beloved hotel owner Jon Handlery and Handlery hotel staff served as “Santa’s Helpers” and assisted with the collection of thousands of toys for needy San Francisco kids.

 

The Handlery Hotel has raised $3,500 and donated two barrels of toys to the drive this year to ensure no kid were without a Holiday present.

 

Firefighters Union Local 798 asked people to bring unwrapped toys which were collected in front of the Handlery Hotel. Everyone who brought a toy got free pictures with Santa and many children brought their lists of Christmas wishes to Santa in person.

 

An additional toy drive was held just next door to the hotel at Lefty O’Doul’s bar and pub, a property which is also owned by the Handlery family.

 

SF Firefighters Local 798 Toy Program

 

The Local 798 San Francisco Firefighters Toy Program is celebrating its 64th year of providing toys to San Francisco children in need during the holidays.  The San Francisco Firefighter’s Toy Program is San Francisco’s largest and the nation’s oldest program of its kind.  Since 1949 it has evolved from a few firefighters repairing broken toys and bikes for 15 families to, in 2012, 300 firefighters and friends volunteering their time to distribute over 200,000 toys to more than 40,000 disadvantaged children.

 

Besides helping individual families in need, the Toy Program serves many community organizations, including shelters for abused women and children, inner-city schools, children’s cancer wards, and pediatric AIDS units.

 

The Toy Program is made possible through public donations and the efforts and contributions of Local 798 members.

 

Firefighters Union Local 798 wishes to thank Jon Handlery & the staff of the Handlery Union Square hotel for welcoming the Toy Program at their property.

 

 

The Handlery Union Square Hotel

 

Located at Union Square, the Handlery Union Square Hotel offers the perfect San Francisco lodging for vacationers and business travelers.  As a fourth generation family-owned hotel, the Handlery has created great experiences for guests by offering personal service, beautifully appointed rooms, and a warm atmosphere.  Ideally located right next to the world famous Powell Street cable car line, the Handlery Union Square Hotel is a beloved San Francisco institution.

 

 

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Canvasback Missions Takes a Major Step in the Fight Against Diabetes in the Marshall Islands

By Alexander Hirata

Canvasback Missions has spent years working to reverse the diabetes epidemic in the Marshall Islands. They’ve brought specialty medical care to the islands for over 30 years, and have run the Diabetes Wellness Center on Majuro since 2006. Now, Canvasback is working to reverse the epidemic of diabetes in the Marshall Islands by preventing the onset of the disease before it begins.

 

Made possible by a generous grant from the World Diabetes Foundation, Canvasback is working with Antonia Demas, Ph.D., and Marshall Islands health officials to bring health education into the classroom. Dr. Demas has visited the Marshall Islands twice so far, traveling last with Canvasback co-founder Jacque Spence and employee Jaylene Chung to implement trials of the new food education curriculum in the public schools on Majuro and Ebeye in October. The team trained instructors how to teach from the curriculum, which involves special hands-on activities to engage children and make food education fun.

 

Dr. Antonia Demas studied education, nutrition, and anthropology at Cornell University. She has developed food-based curricula for schools for over 40 years, successfully implementing her “Food is Elementary” program in over 3,000 schools. Demas is also the founder and president of the New York-based Food Studies Institute, a not-for-profit created to improve children’s health through food education.

 

One of Demas’ key beliefs is that the food we eat directly affects our health. Processed foods have replaced natural ones, and chemical preservatives are now a regular part of our diets. Demas believes that children are the ideal group to teach food literacy to: they don’t have established diets that are difficult to change; they are open to new ideas, especially if taught using sensory (taste, touch, and visual) methods; and healthy habits now would prevent illnesses later.

 

Canvasback is proud to work with Demas, because both know that food education is essential to reverse diabetes in the Marshall Islands. It is cost-efficient, slipping into the existing educational system, yet its effects will last for a lifetime. And once established, local schools and teachers will be in full control of the program. The most difficult part of the program won’t be getting kids interested in healthy eating–it will be waiting years to see how well it pays off.

 

To learn more about the work of Canvasback Missions, contact them at: 940 Adams St., Suite R, Benicia, Calif. 94510. Phone: 800-793-7245 or email them at info@canvasback.org

 

 

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California PUC to Consider Historic Fine Against PG&E and Orrick Herrington Law Firm Attorney in Faulty Gas Line Case

Joseph M. Malkin

PG&E and its Orrick Herrington Attorney are Facing Historic Fines and Legal Sanctions for Misleading the California Public Utilities Commission

The California Public Utilities Commission will vote on historic sanctions and a fine of up to $17 million against the Pacific Gas & Electric Corp. Thursday, Dec. 19 for failing to disclose faulty pipeline records in San Carlos to both the CPUC, the public and the City of San Carlos for nearly a year, creating a possibly dangerous public safety issue that one of its own engineers likened to possibly “another San Bruno situation” in an internal email to PG&E executives.

PG&E and its attorney Joseph M. Malkin of Orrick Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP law firm are facing a fine of up to $17 million for violating CPUC rules and discreetly filing an “errata” – the legal term for a minor correction – on the status of two pipelines, located in San Carlos and Millbrae, nearly a year after a gas leak unexpectedly revealed faulty records for those pipelines.

Pipelines listed as “seamless,” as in the case of the line that ruptured in San Bruno, were in fact a 1929 vintage welded and reconditioned gas pipe with a strength test less than records showed. The legal correction was made quietly on the afternoon of July 3, 2013, a day before the CPUC took off for the July Fourth holiday, disclosing the fact that PG&E had relied on faulty records to determine the specifications for those pipelines to handle gas at high pressure.

The Commission will make this decision three weeks after PG&E CEO and Chairman Tony Earley made a special presentation before the CPUC in an attempt to convince commissioners and the public of the company’s renewed commitment to safety. Earley was met with a skeptical commission, which challenged PG&E’s credibility in the face of mounting recordkeeping errors and threats to public safety. “We find ourselves here today with a public that doesn’t believe you and in many respects doesn’t believe us,” Commissioner Mike Florio said to Earley at the hearing.

City of San Bruno officials have agreed with the proposed fine against PG&E and are calling on the CPUC to uphold proposed sanctions against PG&E for deliberately covering up the facts after it used faulty records to determine that two Bay Area pipelines could safely operate – a decision demonstrating the continued problem with PG&E record keeping practices. Bad record keeping was one of the causes of the 2010 PG&E disaster in San Bruno and continues to threaten public safety.

Calling the July 3 PG&E filing a “brazen and calculated act of damage control,” San Bruno attorneys say PG&E’s legal maneuver illustrates PG&E’s ongoing attempts to cover its tracks as it continues to use natural gas pipelines at inappropriate operating pressures, without accurate records and with the same flawed materials that caused a tragic explosion and fire in San Bruno that killed eight, destroyed 38 homes and damaged scores more.

City officials were shocked to discover that, after gross negligence and bad recordkeeping by PG&E resulted in the fatal tragedy in San Bruno, PG&E paid its legal team to perpetuate their deception at the risk of public safety. They are now calling on the CPUC to issue sanctions and send the strong message that such behavior will not be tolerated. Officials question how many communities must endure tragedy before PG&E and our state utility regulators wake up and put safety first.

Faulty recordkeeping was found to be a major contributor to the explosion and fire in San Bruno after federal and state investigators found that PG&E had maintained bad or nonexistent pipeline safety records for much of its 1,000+ miles of urban natural gas transmission lines. As a result, state regulators required PG&E to lower pressure on its other Peninsula gas pipelines until safety records could be verified.

In 2011, PG&E declared that the pipeline construction records were accurate for both Line 101, which runs from Milpitas to San Francisco, and Line 147, which runs in the San Carlos area. Based on PG&E’s representations, the CPUC allowed PG&E to increase the pressure back to pre-explosion levels.

In reality, PG&E’s pipelines were not rated to operate at higher pressure, as revealed after an October 2012 corrosion-related leak in San Carlos revealed seams in the pipeline previously not thought to exist. Yet, it took nine months for the company to admit – by way of the subtle “errata” filing — that the records it had relied on to make that determination were faulty.

At previous CPUC hearings, regulators pressed PG&E over the “profoundly troubling” oversight, which occurred despite “the expenditure of hundreds of millions of dollars for record review and validation.” PG&E now faces fines of up to $17 million, on top of a possible $2.25 billion penalty and fine stemming from the fatal 2010 explosion and fire in San Bruno.

San Bruno officials say this is just the latest example of PG&E expending millions on top attorneys – more than $120 million by PG&E’s own admission – to subvert the truth and put profits over people.

 

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Congresswoman Uses Steak, Vodka, And Caviar To Hammer Republicans On Food Stamp Cuts

Democratic Rep. Jackie Speier decided to make an unconventional pitch on the House of Representatives floor Thursday to defend food stamps. Speier used a cooked steak, a bottle of vodka, and a can of caviar to point out members of Congress who had large numbers of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients in their districts but opposed the program. The congresswoman pointed out many of the same members of Congress took trips around the world with large stipends for food and lodging.

“In my district, California 14, we have about 4,000 families who are on food stamps, but some of my colleagues have thousands and thousands more,” Rep. Speier said. “Yet, they somehow feel like crusaders, like heroes when they vote to cut food stamps. Some of these same members travel to foreign countries under the guise of official business. They dine at lavish restaurants, eating steak, vodka and even caviar. They receive money to do this. That’s right, they don’t pay out of pocket for these meals.”

Speier went on, using particular examples of members of Congress who went on sponsored trips and spent large amounts of money on food and lodging.

“Let me give you a few examples: One member was given $127.41 a day for food on his trip to Argentina. He probably had a fair amount of steak,” she said.

“Another member was given $3,588 for food and lodging during a six-day trip to Russia. He probably drank a fair amount of vodka and probably even had some caviar. That particular member has 21,000 food stamp recipients in his district. One of those people who is on food stamps could live a year on what this congressman spent on food and lodging for six days,” she added.

“Another 20 members made a trip to Dublin, Ireland. They got $166 a day for food. These members didn’t pay a dime. They received almost $200 for a single meal only for themselves. Yet, for them the idea of helping fellow Americans spend less than $5 a day makes their skin crawl. The families of veterans, of farmers, of the disabled, of the working poor are not visible to them, not even when they are their own constituents.”

In a previous article, BuzzFeed pointed out many of the Republican members of Congress leading the charge to limit the food stamp program represented large numbers of food stamp recipients.

A quick BuzzFeed search found that the member of Congress who took the trip to Argentina who spent $127 was Rep. Frank Lucas of Oklahoma and the trip wassponsored by the Franklin Center for Global Policy Exchange. The member of Congress who took the trip to Russia was Rep. Steve King of Iowa. The 20 members of Congress who went to Dublin can be found here. The trip, sponsored by the Franklin Center for Global Policy Exchange, had an estimated budget of $450,000 to $750,000 according to Roll Call.

From Buzzfeed

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APP TO HELP RESIDENTS KEEP FOOD ON TABLE

Developed by Code of America Fellow, Promptly is Nation’s First Human Services Text Message App

Mayor Edwin M. Lee today launched Promptly, the first application in the country created to send text message notifications for human services clients. Developed by a Code for America Fellow at City Hall this year, Promptly provides clear and concise text messages delivered directly to San Francisco Human Services Agency (HSA) clients that allows them to quickly take action to preserve their benefits.

“Our City strives for strong, healthy communities that can participate in a prosperous economy, and Promptly helps us achieve this by enabling beneficiaries of programs like CalFresh to keep food on the table for their families,” said Mayor Lee. “I am impressed with the partnership with Code for America that uses innovation to help some of our most vulnerable residents.”

The application was built by Code for America Fellows in collaboration with the San Francisco Human Services Agency (HSA) and the Mayor’s Office. Promptly is first rolling out with CalFresh clients and then will continue on to other programs. When benefits for a client change or need to be renewed, they are currently mailed a notice of this change. However, these paper notices may be missed for a number of reasons – meaning a client’s benefits could expire without their knowledge until an inopportune time, like when checking out at the grocery store. Once this happens, reinstating benefits after a lapse can be frustrating and time consuming for the client. Text messages, delivered in addition to the mailed notices, reduce the likelihood of these lapses.
“The Human Services Agency mission is to promote well-being and self-sufficiency among individuals, families and communities in San Francisco,” said HSA Executive Director Trent Rhorer. “We must constantly improve ways for our residents to access our benefits and remain enrolled to receive the services they need. Promptly is a huge step forward towards doing just that.”

So far, 700 users have already signed up to receive text messages. In early piloting of the program, HSA has texted around 100 clients with a 50 percent response rate—a far greater response rate than traditional mailers or email. With more than 90 percent of the U.S. population having access to short message system (SMS) or text message capabilities on their cell phones, Promptly stands to make a big impact as more individuals enroll. Text messages from Promptly are translated into six languages.

“We are excited to let HSA clients know about Promptly. Both HSA and our team believe that text messaging is a quick and easy way to reach people who are in danger of not receiving necessary benefits. If clients receive a text message that enables them to stay on benefits – that’s food that a client has for the next six months,” said Andy Hull, a Code for America Fellow. “This project was a true collaboration between Code for America and the City of San Francisco, and we’re looking forward to expanding Promptly to every HSA client in San Francisco.”
Code for America

Founded in 2009, Code for America (CfA) is a nonprofit collaborating with local governments to foster and facilitate innovation. CfA is known for its fellowship program, which embeds tech and design professionals in local governments explore new approaches to resolving local challenges. Through the Accelerator, Brigade, and Peer Network programs, CfA is connecting cities with startups and volunteers, as well as each other. For more information, go to: www.codeforamerica.org.

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Scavenged Materials Used to Construct First “Recycled Holiday Tree” as Hillsdale Shopping Center Kicks-Off Holiday Season with “Zero Waste” Tree

Recycled plastic, plywood and bed slats scavenged and reused by Recology to make recycled tree

Hillsdale Shopping Center is bringing sustainable holiday cheer to patrons by installing its very first recycled tree, designed by Recology San Mateo County (RSMC), located in the South End of the Center near Forever 21.

“The holidays are a time for sharing and we thought the concept of sharing recycled materials was a fun way to share the idea of reuse with our community,” said Christine Kupczak of Hillsdale Shopping Center.

The tree was designed by the employee-owners of Recology San Mateo County and built from scavenged materials found in Recology’s Disposal and Recycling Centers in San Francisco and San Bruno. The tree stands roughly eight feet tall and was built from an Ikea bed frame, recycled plastic bottles, and plywood.

“We believe this tree serves as a beautiful reminder to all of us to be more conscientious about our environment this holiday season,” Kupczak said.

Recology V.P and General Manager Mario Puccinelli said that even the toy wagon and tricycle around the tree were rescued from the disposal area. “With just a little elbow grease and a coat of fresh paint they are ready to be enjoyed again and will be donated to the Redwood City/San Mateo County Toy Drive” said Puccinelli.

The tree will be installed at 9 a.m., Monday, Nov. 25 and will be on display through the end of December

For more information about how you can make your holiday just a little greener this season, check out Recology’s Holiday Tips page at www.recologysanmateocounty.com/holiday_tips.php

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MAYOR ANNOUNCES NEW NONPROFIT VENTURE TO PROVIDE PERMANENT HOMES FOR ARTS ORGANIZATIONS IN CENTRAL MARKET & THE TENDERLOIN

Community Arts Stabilization Trust (CAST) Keeps Arts Organizations Thriving in Central Market & Tenderloin Neighborhoods

Mayor Edwin M. Lee and District Six Supervisor Jane Kim joined newly formed nonprofit Community Arts Stabilization Trust (CAST) to announce the purchase of two arts building in the Central Market and the Tenderloin.

The CAST purchase will allow the Luggage Store Gallery owners to maintain occupancy of their building and ultimately to assume full ownership, which was at risk of sale due to private investors, and will enable the Luggage Store Gallery’s subtenant Hospitality House Community Art Program to sign a long term lease. CAST also announced the purchase of the underutilized former adult theater at 80 Turk Street in the Tenderloin, one block off Market, and CounterPULSE, a cornerstone of the Bay Area performing arts scene now located South of Market in a building it rents, will begin fundraising to assume ownership of the 80 Turk Street building and move its multi-use performing arts facility in early 2015.

“A major transformation is underway on Central Market, and arts are central to that revitalization,” said Mayor Lee. “Long-time neighborhood institutions like CounterPULSE and The Luggage Store not only anchor the growing arts district but maintain the fabric of creative nonprofit organizations that characterize Central Market.  Creative endeavors like CAST propel the City’s efforts to enhance the role of arts organizations in the neighborhood while ensuring the longevity of these important institutions.”

“I appreciate the importance of permanent physical centers to provide stable spaces for generating creativity and audiences for the arts,” said Supervisor Kim. “Recognizing the challenges for the arts during the last boom cycle, CAST took action and developed a program to permanently acquire buildings in the Tenderloin and Central Market to support these organizations. This is one solution the City can continue to support and expand in order to preserve what builds community and neighborhoods.

CAST was recently formed by the Kenneth Rainin Foundation and the Northern California Community Loan Fund (NCCLF) to support the City’s efforts to expand and provide long-term stability to arts groups in Central Market and the Tenderloin as part of the Central Market Economic Strategy. The Kenneth Rainin Foundation committed $5 million over five years as seed funding to pilot their program for stabilizing space for community arts organizations in the Central Market area. The pilot program includes the acquisition of two arts facilities sites in Central Market and the Tenderloin.

The City’s Grants for the Arts, the Arts Commission, and Office of Economic and Workforce Development (OEWD) are currently providing over $150,000 capacity-building funding for the Luggage Store Gallery and $180,000 to CounterPULSE for capacity-building and predevelopment for the Turk Street theater space. CAST will work closely with tenant organizations as they raise the remaining funds for building renovations. CAST is seeking capital to undertake more acquisitions to serve as permanent affordable art space in the neighborhood.

“CAST will enable these nonprofit arts organizations to build their capacity and contribute to the neighborhood’s vibrancy without the threat of displacement,” said CAST Board Chair said Eric Rodenbeck. “This is particularly important in the Tenderloin and Central Market where skyrocketing property values threaten the stability of community arts organizations.”

“In taking these vital first steps, CAST, with relatively limited means, is making the effort to achieve an equitable transformation of our Mid-Market neighborhood, securing affordable housing for not for profit arts organizations and the artists they serve,” said The Luggage Store Co-Founder and Director Darryl Smith

“I believe the arts can play a powerful role during this time of rapid change in our City,” said CounterPULSE Executive and Artistic Director Jessica Robinson Love. “CounterPULSE is a hub where long-time low-income residents are as valued as the tech workers new to the neighborhood, and where these communities can come into dialogue through shared cultural experiences. Participating in CAST offers us a unique opportunity to secure our future, and we will be looking to the community for the additional support we need to renovate and purchase our new building.”

Mayor Lee and Supervisor Kim also announced the availability of real estate and financing technical assistance services to nonprofit arts organizations and small businesses on Central Market, Sixth Street and the Tenderloin through City funding for NCCLF and Urban Solutions. The Central Market/Tenderloin Technical Assistance Program, along with CAST, were developed as part of the implementation of the Central Market Economic Strategy, whose objectives included the cultivation of an arts district in the area and a vibrant cluster of retail storefronts. The program is coordinated through OEWD and can assist existing nonprofit and small businesses in the neighborhood as well as act as a resource for those wishing to locate in the area. A primary goal of the program is to secure long-term leases for these businesses and organizations.

About Community Arts Stabilization Trust (CAST)

CAST purchases and leases space for the exclusive use of nonprofit arts organizations while also providing these groups with technical assistance to develop and expand their capacity to fundraise, manage their facilities effectively, and potentially own their building. CAST seeks additional support from foundations, individuals and investors for its capacity building efforts and expansion beyond its pilot projects. For more information, go to: www.cast-sf.org.

About Kenneth Rainin Foundation

The mission of the Kenneth Rainin Foundation is to enhance quality of life by championing and sustaining the arts, promoting early childhood literacy, and supporting research to cure chronic disease. The Foundation believes that people trying to affect change need an early champion for their ideas. Like its founder, the Foundation listens to and invests in innovative and collaborative projects that can achieve real breakthroughs and make life better for us all. For more information, go to: www.krfoundation.org.

About Northern California Community Loan Fund (NCCLF)

NCCLF is a nonprofit Community Development Financial Institution that provides financial resources and real estate consulting and financial training to nonprofits that serve low-income communities throughout the 46 Northern California counties in its service area. NCCLF’s  mission is to alleviate poverty and provide economic justice to low-income, low-wealth and disadvantaged communities. NCCLF is one of the lead advisors for the Mayor’s Central Market Economic Strategy on revitalizing the Central Market area and also provides financial training and real estate consulting to nonprofits and project management services for CAST.  For more information, go to: www.ncclf.org.

About CounterPULSE

CounterPULSE is building a movement of risk-taking art that shatters assumptions and builds community.  The organization serves as an incubator for the creation of socially relevant, community-based art and culture by offering  a high-quality season of contemporary dance, theater and performance, providing subsidized studio space and support services to independent artists and cultural innovators, and partnering with social service organizations to offer unique arts experiences to youth, seniors, and neighborhood residents. For more information, go to: www.counterpulse.org.

About The Luggage Store Gallery

The Luggage Store Gallery (as known as 509 Cultural Center) is an artist-run nonprofit multidisciplinary arts organization founded in 1987 by a group of Tenderloin artists  and residents to build community by organizing arts programming accessible to and reflect of the Bay Area’s residents.  Their innovative programs are designed to broaden social and aesthetic networks, to encourage the flow of images and ideas between the diverse cultural communities that cross paths in the exceptionally dynamic downtown San Francisco neighborhood.  They operate three distinct venues: the Luggage Store Gallery, the Luggage Store Annex at 509 Ellis, and the Tenderloin National Forest at 511 Ellis Street.

About Hospitality House Community Art Program

Hospitality House is a community center for San Francisco’s Tenderloin, Mid-Market, and Sixth Street Corridor neighborhoods. Their Community Arts Program is the City’s only free-of-charge fine arts studio and gallery, offering more than 250 community artists the materials and space to create, exhibit, and sell their artwork.

 

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CAL PERFORMANCES PRESENTS ITS SECOND ANNUAL ARTS LEARNING CONFERENCE “REACHING FOR THE STARS” ON WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 13, FROM 11:00 A.M. TO 7:00 P.M. AT ZELLERBACH HALL

This year’s focus is Turning STEM to STEAM—

Enlivening Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics through Arts Integration

 Cal Performances’ second annual arts learning conference invites educators, scientists, artists, and policymakers to sustained dialogue about Turning STEM to STEAM—Enlivening Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics through Arts Integration. Conference goers will explore the commonalities between scientific and artistic thinking and delve into arts-based approaches to academic subjects on Wednesday, November 13 from 11:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. at Zellerbach Hall. “This ongoing series of conferences speak to the values that sit at the heart of Cal Performances: the importance of the arts in every child’s education,” said Matías Tarnopolsky, Artistic and Executive Director of Cal Performances. “During this event we will explore the essential nature of arts education and how it transforms classrooms and the lives of students.”

Conference presenters include Jason Neulander, the creator and director of The Intergalactic Nemesis: Book One: Target Earth; keynote speaker Kenneth Goldberg, Distinguished  Professor of New Media and Professor of Industrial Engineering and Operations Research at UC Berkeley; Milton Chen, Senior Fellow and Executive Director Emeritus at The George Lucas Educational Foundation; Sabrina Klein, a theater artist, educator, and researcher; Violet Juno, a performer and teaching artist; and Rica Anderson, a Cal Performances’ teaching artist.

Because of its unique position in the arts world and its affiliation with the finest public university in the nation, Cal Performances is inspired to create this annual platform for in depth conversations about arts education. “Reaching for the Stars” is presented by Cal Performances in association with the Alameda County Arts Commission and Creative Impact, a Bay Area alliance of arts educators dedicated to strengthening, enriching, and improving the social fabric of our community through arts education. The first “Reaching for the Stars” conference was held in November 2012 and was planned in conjunction with the residency of the Simon Bolivar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela with conductor Gustavo Dudamel; it centered on music education using the model of Venezuela’s famed El Sistema.

“Reaching for the Stars” begins at Zellerbach Hall at 11:00 a.m. with participants attending a one hour Schooltime performance of the science fiction live-action, graphic novel Intergalactic Nemesis: Book One: Target Earth, alongside an auditorium filled with Bay Area students. Following the performance, a brown bag lunch and discussion themed “Curiosity, Passion and Discipline: How artistic practice enlivens STEM,” will be facilitated by Sabrina Klein and Rica Anderson. Teachers, artists, and arts administrators will bring their experience to the table to explore the implications of STEAM in the classroom; the ways in which art and science are inherently linked; and how an arts-based approach to learning can benefit every student.

Afternoon sessions begin at 1:45 p.m. and include a hands-on approach to moving curriculum from STEM to STEAM through the insights of artists, scientists, and teachers. Topics covered include how the disciplinary practices of artists and scientists are congruent; the role of experimentation in learning, including an interactive Foley Sound demonstration with Jason Neulander using artistic elements from Intergalactic Nemesis; a look into the intertwined nature of art and science by Kenneth Goldberg—an equally accomplished engineer, artist, entrepreneur and thinker; an exploration of the roles of imagination, exploration and experimentation in creating art. The partnership of Campbell Union School District with the Montalvo Art Center will be examined for its effective integration of STEAM curriculum into the public schools. Milton Chen, author of Education Nation: Six Leading Edges of Innovation in Our Schools, will have the final word followed by a wine and cheese reception at 7:00 p.m.

Registration and further information is available on Cal Performances’ website (HOT LINK) http://calperformances.org/learn/discover-engage/calendar.php.

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Hillsdale Shopping Center and San Mateo Fire Department Team Up for 34th Annual Toys for Tots Drive

Hillsdale Shopping Center and the San Mateo Fire Department are teaming up to give back this holiday season. Together, the team is bringing the 34th Annual Toys for Tots Drive to Hillsdale.  Toy donations, both new and used, will be accepted Monday, December 2 through December 22 at the San Mateo Firefighter’s Booth near the LEGO store.

“It is always a joy to team up with the San Mateo Fire Department during the holiday season to continue to bring Toys for Tots to Hillsdale,” said Hillsdale Shopping Center Marketing Director Christine Kupczak. “We are so pleased to be a part of this generous community that continues to give back year after year, helping to make the holiday season brighter for the children in our community,” she said.

DATE:                        December 2-December 22

LOCATON:              Hillsdale Shopping Center, next to LEGO Store

Hillsdale Shopping Center is a leading San Mateo shopping destination that offers more than 120 specialty stores and restaurants. Tenants include anchors Nordstrom, Macy’s, Forever 21 and Sears as well as specialty shops like H&M, UNIQLO, The Apple Store White House | Black Market, Banana Republic, Coach, Trader Joe’s, Michael Kors, Crazy 8, Pandora, The Apple Store, DSW Shoes, LEGO®,  Williams-Sonoma, Guitar Center, Cost Plus World Market and more. Additionally, the shopping center offers several restaurants including The Cheesecake Factory, California Pizza Kitchen, The Counter Custom Built Burgers, and Andersen Bakery. Hillsdale Shopping Center is located at off Hwy 101 at Hillsdale Blvd and El Camino Real in San Mateo. For more information visit www.hillsdale.com or call 650.345.8222.

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San Bruno Demands Accurate PG&E Pipeline Records and Active CPUC Oversight

 San Bruno City leaders today called on the Pacific Gas & Electric Company and the California Public Utilities Commission to provide accurate pipeline safety records, enhanced emergency response protocols and vigilant State oversight following revelations of persistent safety threats to PG&E’s pipeline 147 in San Carlos, just 14 miles south of the deadly 2010 PG&E pipeline explosion in San Bruno.

At a hearing hosted by Sen. Jerry Hill and a California Senate subcommittee on Gas and Electric Infrastructure Safety on Monday, leaders from the cities of San Bruno and San Carlos said they were deeply troubled to discover that PG&E had once again used faulty records to falsely determine the San Carlos pipeline safe. Even worse, that it took 11 months for PG&E to alert San Carlos officials of possible threats to the defective pipe. Federal and state investigators identified faulty recordkeeping as the leading cause of the Sept. 9, 2010 pipeline explosion in San Bruno that killed 8, destroyed 38 homes and damaged scores more.

Of equal concern was the lack of oversight provided by the CPUC, the regulatory agency that is supposed to act as a watchdog for public safety, which also failed to notify city leaders, city staff, and the public of the potential for “sitting on another San Bruno situation,” according to PG&E’s own engineer.

“We call on PG&E and the CPUC to remedy these persistent threats to the safety of our communities,” said San Bruno Mayor Jim Ruane. “We ask that PG&E and the CPUC communicate with local governments in a manner that is honest, timely and transparent so that city and county leaders are not left in the dark after a threat is discovered beneath our communities and our citizens.”

City leaders asked for the help of Sen. Hill and state leaders by establishing an Office of Local Government Liaison, which would coordinate emergency response plans with a community’s first responders and force utilities like PG&E to operate with transparency and integrity with regard to their facilities.

Ruane said state intervention was necessary to end the faulty recordkeeping by PG&E and the lack of transparency by PG&E and the CPUC, which continues to put the lives of all 740,000 county residents at risk.

“Each of the 20 cities in San Mateo and their citizens deserve to know about threats to their safety from PG&E and the CPUC,” Ruane said. “This is not just a matter of common sense but mandatory of a company that enjoys a legal monopoly and of the regulatory agency, the CPUC, whose very job is to protect the public, its interest and its safety.”

San Bruno is asking the following going-forward commitments from PG&E and the CPUC:

  • That PG&E notify cities, counties and the CPUC within 24 hours should it detect any immediate threats to public safety or any discrepancies in its records.
  • That PG&E staff a dedicated, 24/7, employee to its Dispatch and Control Room, trained to communicate with emergency responders and city officials in the event of an emergency.
  • That PG&E provide better public awareness and outreach programs to local governments so that emergency responders are aware of important pipeline information and know what to do in an emergency.
  • That PG&E work with local cities to establish a regular, productive and open 2 way communication to address important safety issues in each community.

San Bruno is seeking an Independent Monitor to ensure that PG&E follows its own safety plan in the face of possible lax enforcement by politically appointed CPUC Commissioners with close ties to utilities.  San Bruno also reminded the committee that the City is seeking maximum penalties and fines from the CPUC against PG&E for its gross negligence in the San Bruno Explosion and Fire – a decision that is expected to be made within coming months.

“San Bruno will continue to hold PG&E accountable for its past actions and to advocate for changes and active oversight by the CPUC,” Ruane said. “We are committed to ensuring that legacy of our City becomes an opportunity to prevent another deadly explosion from happening again, in San Carlos or in any community in our state.”

 

 

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Man acquitted of sex with BART seat

If you miss BART during the strike, this might make you miss it a bit less: A man accused of trying to make love to a train seat was acquitted of felony indecent exposure and released from San Francisco jail Monday.

Leslie Bailey, 28, was arrested May 8 shortly after a BART train operator saw him on on his knees in the nearly empty first car, thrusting his pelvis against a seat next to the cab.

Bailey, who boarded the Dublin-Pleasanton train at the 16th Street Station, exited at Civic Center but returned to his paramour just before the doors closed, according to the San Francisco public defender’s office. The operator testified that she then saw him gyrating on his stomach, his feet in the aisle, before he flipped over and began masturbating and smoking crack cocaine.

Bailey never acknowledged the operator while in the throes of passion, but noticed her once he exited at the Powell Street Station, the public defender’s office said. The operator testified that while Bailey apologized to her for smoking, his genitals were peeking out from beneath his shirt. BART police arrested him in the station and confiscated his crack cocaine pipe.

This isn’t the first time this sort of thing has happened on BART. In July, the amorous actions of a pair of passengers, posted online, aroused an official investigation.

Deputy Public Defender Emily Dahm, Bailey’s attorney, said the problem in this case was that her client had not been taking his anti-psychotic medication regularly. Plus, he was binging on crack cocaine.

She argued during the weeklong trial that Bailey, who is homeless, had been trying to have a private moment and not to attract public attention. To convict someone of felony indecent exposure, prosecutors must prove that the defendant was seeking attention.

According to court records, Bailey was convicted of felony indecent exposure in 2007 in San Francisco.

This time, the jury acquitted Bailey of one count of indecent exposure, deadlocked on a second count and convicted him of misdemeanor lewd acts. Prosecutors dismissed the remaining felony charge Monday.

Bailey was sentenced to time served and released. Public Defender Jeff Adachi said Bailey is now free to seek the mental health treatment he needs.

The district attorney’s office declined to comment.

It is unknown if the BART seat in question in this case was a newer, easier-to-clean model or an older cloth version.
sfgate

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On Scene with Bill Wilson


As the government shutdown enters the second week, I attended three events last weekend that emphatically reminded me about the greatness of the human spirit that seems so not in evidence on the national political scene. The three events might at first seem unrelated – a 75th birthday party, a worship service honoring marriage equality and President and Mrs. Carter joining hundreds of Habitat for Humanity volunteers in Oakland, California to build hones for people who need them. However they were united by common use of the words like love, humanity, dignity and rights.

 

 Joy Bianchi celebrates her 75th birthday at the Fairmont

 

Joy Bianchi is an incredible woman who has spent 60 of her 75 years helping people with developmental handicaps. She founded Helpers of the Mentally Retarded, (a name which will soon be changed to just plain “Helpers”) a group devoted to helping provide for people with handicaps with safe places to be. From 1966 until 2003 they ran group homes. Their fundraising efforts included a boutique store in Ghirardelli Square and a Haute Couture Boutique on Fulton Street. Her birthday dinner was held at the Fairmont and preceded by a reception in the penthouse. She spoke very movingly of what it is that a person with developmental handicaps needs. I would do a disservice to Joy’s eloquence to try to paraphrase or summarize her words, but as I listened I was struck that the needs were universal – a place of safety, stability and interaction with people.

Both President Carter and Joy Bianchi understand the basic need for housing. Providing a safe place for people to live should be a basic human right that needs to be recognized by our society. Our society also needs to recognize the right of any individual the right to marry the person they love. That was the point of the annual Witness Our Welcome service held Sunday October 6 at the Walnut Creek United Methodist Church were John Lewis and Stuart Gaffney, marriage equality advocates,  were honored with the Spirit Award.

 

 John Lewis and Stuart Gaffney at Walnut Creek United Methodist Church

 

After partying Saturday night, worshipping Sunday afternoon, Monday morning dawned bright and early as I made my way across the new Bay Bridge to Oakland to the Brookfield Village neighborhood in Oakland. The Carters were already at work when I arrived at 8:30am and I was able to get some photos of the Carters working on putting in window frames on the first floor of a two story home on Brookfield Court. For me both the Carters and Joy Bianchi exemplify the kind of people who live their faith through example rather than words and whose actions have made the world a better place for all.

 

President Carter measuring for a window sill.

 

There was a personal highlight of the day for me. One of the volunteers on the project was a nephew of Mrs. Carter. He bought his family over to where the President and Mrs. Carter were working to say hello. President and Mrs. Carter came outside to talk with them. After several minutes President Carter went back inside to go back to work but Mrs. Carter stayed a little longer to talk with them. The saw for cutting various pieces of wood were located in what will become the front yard. So when President Carter came back outside with a piece of wood that needed to be cut, he looked around to see where Mrs. Carter was. Seeing that she was still talking with her relative he turned to the group of media and said, “Can I get some help holding this?” Since I was the nearest person I ended up holding the wood while he made the cut.     

 

 President Carter gets an assist from Mrs. Carter as he cuts wood for a window frame.


If someone were to ask me what makes America great I would cite these three examples of people volunteering to make the world a better place for everyone.  

 

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This Is Why People Who Live In San Francisco Are So Happy And Healthy

The Huffington Post  

san francisco
Rudyard Kipling once said that the only drawback to San Francisco is how hard it is to leave.

Many San Franciscans would agree with Kipling: Bay Area natives and transplants alike tend to be fiercely loyal to their city, and most SFers would tell you that they could never imagine living anywhere else. With sweeping vistas on every hill, beautiful beaches, year-round free concerts and cultural activities — not to mention some of the best food, music and art in the country — it’s easy to see why so many have been lured by the siren song of the San Francisco Bay.

Besides being one of the most visually stunning seven-by-seven square miles on earth, San Francisco has also topped rankings of the happiesthealthiest and fittest cities in America, and Bloomberg Businessweek called San Francisco the best city in America in 2012.

Here are 12 reasons that San Francisco is one of the happiest and healthiest places in the U.S. — and lessons that it can teach the rest of America about living well.

It’s veggie-friendly.

vegan stew recipes

Considered one of the most “veg-friendly” cities in the US by PETA, San Francisco is not only an oasis of vegetarian and vegan restaurants, according to VegSF, but also has myriad vegetarian and vegan-friendly menus, even at restaurants with meat dishes. You can even eat the fruit that grows on the trees in certain public parks in San Francisco. And with the vegan paradise that is Berkeley right across the bay, herbivores will never run out of dining options.

It has a vibrant spiritual life.

buddha lessons

Meditation, yoga and Eastern philosophy are a part of the city’s DNA, thanks to a long history of Eastern religious studies at its cultural centers. The Buddhist philosopher and writer Alan Watts, a transplant to San Francisco from England, introduced thousands to Eastern philosophy in the late 1950s and early 1960s (his TV series “Eastern Wisdom and Modern Life” aired in San Francisco and helped spread Zen ideology in the U.S.). But no matter your faith, an emphasis on spiritual belief systems has been found to reduce stress levels and increase well-being, making it a likely contributor to its San Franciscans’ good health.

San Francisco is also home to the oldest Buddhist temple in the U.S., and it’s the birthplace of Burning Man, an event that attracts many seeking spiritual release. Centers like Mount Madonna, Green Gulch Zen Center, Spirit Rock and the Esalen Institute also offer workshops and retreats within a short drive of the city.

It’s organic.

farmers market berries

The city by the bay was voted the number-one best city to live the organic foodie lifestyle by the online magazine Organic Authority. Farmer’s markets, community farms, organic restaurants and food co-ops (Rainbow Grocery in the Mission has been sharing organic food with the community since 1975) are easy to find.

An organic diet can help to reduce the synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, antibiotics and hormones that we consume from conventional food sources. And while the link between these compounds and human health isn’t definitive, most researchers agree that we don’t know what the long-term health consequences of eating these could be.

It’s home to some of the country’s best public parks.

golden gate park

San Francisco’s parks — ranging from Golden Gate Park to the Presidio to Dolores Park — were ranked the best in the country last year by nonprofit conservation group, The Trust for Public Land. Public art is also everywhere, including the famous Heartsdotted all over the city, commissioned in 2004 by the San Francisco General Hospital. Recently, Parkets – parking space-sized mini-parks that have copped up across town, offering greenery and seating to passersby — have become the latest addition to the SF park scene.

Maybe that’s why San Franciscans can seem so zen and so fit: Walking through green spaces, even in the middle of cities, can put the brain into a state of meditation,according to a recent UK study. And research has shown that public parks contribute to physical activity rates among city residents.

And speaking of fitness, outdoor activities are everywhere.

crissy field

Outdoor recreational activities and exercise options help make the San Francisco Bay Area the seventh-fittest metropolitan area in America. Between doing tai chi in Washington Square Park, surfing at Ocean Beach and practicing yoga in Golden Gate Park, there’s an outdoor activity for every fitness personality. The city’s beautiful public trails and temperate weather make it easy to fit in daily workouts without a gym membership. (Not to mention that San Franciscans also build quads of steel from walking up the city’s many steep hills.)

It has the “culture cure.”

outside lands lineup

Live music, art, theater and literary events are all over the Bay, all year round — and attending these cultural events could have some big health benefits. Studies have found that attending cultural events could lower blood pressure and also promote mental health by warding off anxiety and depression.

“When it comes to nourishing the soul, [San Francisco's] vibrant arts, entertainment, and recreational offerings set it apart,” wrote Sarah Mahoney and Susan Coenen as part of a Prevention study of the 25 healthiest, happiest cities in America. “While it may seem obvious that those options make people happier, they also make them healthier.”

It’s close to nature.

point reyes

The stress-relieving and happiness-boosting benefits of spending time in nature are well documented. Aside from the many green spaces and beaches within San Francisco proper, SFers can easily reconnect with nature by driving only a short distance from the city. Marin Headlands, Point Reyes National Seashore, Muir Woods and Mount Tamalpais State Park offer miles of hiking and biking trails in some of the most beautiful natural landscapes on the West Coast.

Yoga is everywhere — even in the airport.

airport yoga meditation

Yoga studios are nearly as ubiquitous in San Francisco as coffee shops. The city’s New Age roots gave rise to a number of yoga and meditation centers and many of them are still popular today. And that’s great for city residents, who can enjoy the practice’sstrength and flexibility training as well as it’s calming effect on stress. Now, it’s easy to find nearly any type of yoga in the city, including naked yoga in Noe ValleyTerminal Two of the San Francisco International Airport also has a yoga room for travelers looking for a little on-the-go zen.

It’s one of the best cities for biking.

bike san francisco

As residents of the eighth-best city for bikers by Bicycling Magazine, Bay Area drivers are used to sharing the road with bikers: Since 2010, San Francisco has installed 20 new miles of bike lanes, 25 bike-parking areas, and traffic signals giving riders the right-of-way. The new Bay Bridge even included the installation of a $500 million hanging bike lane, the first of its kind.

And the research shows that biking and bike commuting can have a huge impact on health. One Danish study found that bikers had a lower risk of death from any cause than their more sedentary counterparts. And in a separate Australian study, researchers found that people who replaced their car commute with biking lowered their risk of stroke and heart attack, improved their cholesterol and their aerobic fitness within one year, NPR reported.

Locals enjoy the health benefits of moderate wine consumption.

napa wine

Thanks to world class vineyards in nearby Napa and Sonoma, wine is a part of the Northern California culture. We’ve all heard that one glass of red wine a day can improve your health, and it’s true: Numerous studies have linked moderate wine consumption with a lower risk of becoming overweight or obese. Red wine also contain heart-healthy antioxidants and Resveratrol, which may reduce bad cholesterol, according to the Mayo Clinic.

It’s a dog-friendly city.

dog san francisco

It’s commonly said that there are more dogs than children in San Francisco, andaccording to the San Francisco Chronicle, it’s actually true. As of 2007, census data showed that the city’s dog population trumped that of children.

“Nobody beats San Francisco when it comes to doting on dogs,” the Chronicle wrote. “It’s a city with luxury dog hotels, rooftop dog cocktail parties, a pet cemetery and City Hall plans to turn dog droppings into alternative energy.”

And that isn’t just good news for pooches: Pet ownership has been linked to reduced levels of stress and relief from mild depression, and improved heart health

It’s a place that celebrates community.

san francisco baker beach

As HuffPost San Francisco Editorial Fellow Lydia O’Connor points out, the “event to be at” in San Francisco is frequently free, outdoors and well-attended. Free events ranging from concerts to yoga classes are easy to come by, as are group volunteering activities and community art projects like the 16th Avenue tiled steps in the Sunset.

These community events don’t just benefit the city as a whole, they can have an effect on individual residents. Strong social ties and community bonds have been linkedwith lower stress levels and increased well-being and longevity.

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Pablo Heras-Casado Leads The SF Symphony And Chorus, Leila Josefowicz, And Guest Vocal Soloists In Two-Week Festival Pairing Music By Thomas Adès And Mendelssohn October 3-13 At Davies Symphony Hall

Festival program is inspired by Shakespearean and literary themes, dance, and the Baroque

Spanish conductor Pablo Heras-Casado, whose compelling command of the repertoire ranges from early music through core classical works and new music, returns to the SF Symphony to lead the Orchestra and Chorus with violinist Leila Josefowicz and guest vocal soloists in a two-week Mendelssohn-Thomas Adès festival October 3-13 at Davies Symphony Hall. The festival’s musical focus explores and juxtaposes the works of the two composers in orchestral and chamber settings of music influenced by Shakespeare, dance, literature, and the artists’ mutual fascination with the Baroque. Thomas Adès performs two of his own works and music by Ravel at the piano and harpsichord in an October 3 chamber concert with SF Symphony musicians.

Week 1: October 3-6

The festival’s opening orchestral program, beginning October 3 at 2 pm, features the first SFS performances of Adès’ Three Studies from Couperin and Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 3, Scottish on a program with Stravinsky’s Violin Concerto, performed by Leila Josefowicz. Illuminating Mendelssohn and Adès’ shared enthusiasm for the Baroque, the program also includes the first SFS performances of Jean-Baptiste Lully’s Overture and Passacaille from Armide (1686).

Also on October 3, at 8 pm, Thomas Adès will perform two of his compositions, Piano Quintet, and Sonata da Caccia for Oboe, Horn, and Harpsichord, at the keyboard with members of the Orchestra in a chamber concert at Davies Symphony Hall. Debussy’s Sonata for Flute, Viola, and Harp and Ravel’s Chansons madécasses, with Adès on piano, round out the program.


Week 2: October 10-13

In a program inspired by William Shakespeare and Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Heras-Casado conducts the SF Symphony and Chorus with a cast of soloists including soprano Audrey Luna (Ariel), mezzo-soprano Charlotte Hellekant, mezzo-soprano Isabel Leonard, tenor Alek Shrader, and baritone Rod Gilfry in the Orchestra’s first performances of scenes from The Tempest, Adès’ acclaimed second opera (his first was Powder Her Face). Luna sang the role of Ariel at the Metropolitan Opera in 2012 under Adès’ direction. The program also includes Mendelssohn’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream and the first SFS performances of Die erste Walpurgisnacht.

Hellekant’s SFS debut and only previous performances were in 1992 under Conductor Laureate and then-Music Director Herbert Blomstedt, performing Mahler’s Symphony No. 2. Luna, Leonard, Shrader and Gilfry will all make their SFS debuts with these performances.


About Pablo Heras-Casado

 

Pablo Heras-Casado enjoys an unusually varied conducting career, encompassing the great symphonic and operatic repertoire, historically-informed performance, and cutting-edge contemporary scores. In 2011 he was appointed Principal Conductor of the Orchestra of St. Luke’s in New York, beginning a four-year term, including an annual concert season at Carnegie Hall. He made his first conducting appearances with the SF Symphony in 2010, conducting the music of Mendelssohn, Shostakovich, Liszt, and Kurtág. He returned in 2012 and 2013, with programs encompassing Stravinsky, Prokofiev, de Falla, Ravel, Liszt, Magnus Lindberg, and Luigi Dallapiccola.

In the 2013-14 season, Heras-Casado debuts with the New York Philharmonic, Philadelphia Orchestra, London Symphony Orchestra, Philharmonia Orchestra, and Gewandhaus Orchester Leipzig, as well as at the Metropolitan Opera, where he conducts Verdi’s Rigoletto. He returns to Carnegie Hall and the Caramoor Festival with the Orchestra of St. Luke’s, and conducts Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 at the New Year’s concerts of Staatskapelle Berlin. Other highlights, in addition to his performances with the San Francisco Symphony, include engagements with Münchner Philharmoniker, Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra and Ensemble Intercontemporain. He also tours with Freiburger Barockorchester and guest conducts a series of concert and opera performances at the Mariinsky Theatre.

This month, Harmonia Mundi releases Heras-Casado’s recording of Schubert’s Symphonies Nos. 3 & 4 with Freiburger Barockorchester. A second album, featuring Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks in Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 2, Lobgesang, follows in March 2014. Also this fall is the release of a disc on Sony featuring Plácido Domingo in baritone arias by Verdi with the Orquestra de la Comunitat Valenciana, conducted by Heras-Casado.

Recognized also for his work with contemporary music, Heras-Casado is a laureate of the 2007 Lucerne Festival conductors’ forum. In summer 2013, he returned for the third time to co-direct the festival’s Academy at the personal invitation of Pierre Boulez.

Heras-Casado is the holder of the Medalla de Honor of the Rodriguez Acosta Foundation, and in February 2012 was awarded with the Golden Medal of Merit by the Council of Granada, his hometown, of which he is also an Honorary Ambassador. His 2011 DVD recording of Kurt Weill’s Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny from Teatro Real received the Diapason d’Or.

About Thomas Adès


 

 

Renowned as both a composer and a performer, Adès works regularly with the world’s leading opera companies and festivals. He has conducted the Chamber Orchestra of Europe, the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra, London Symphony Orchestra, the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra, the BBC, Finnish and Danish Radio Symphony Orchestras, the London Sinfonietta, and many others. The SF Symphony co-commissioned and performed his work Polaris with original video from Tal Rosner during its 2011-12 Centennial season. The Orchestra and Leila Josefowicz performed Adès’ Violin Concerto (Concentric Paths) in 2009.

Last season, Adès made his Metropolitan Opera debut both as a conductor and as a composer, leading the Met premiere of his 2004 masterpiece, The Tempest, in a new production by Robert Lepage that was also seen internationally as part of “The Met Live in HD” cinemacast series. He also led the Boston Symphony in performances of his piano concerto In Seven Days and Prokofiev’s Piano Concerto No. 1 – both with Kirill Gerstein – as well as Sibelius’s Sixth Symphony and Luonnotar with soprano Dawn Upshaw. During the 2013/2014 season, Adès returns to the Boston Symphony to conduct a program of Mendelssohn, Ives, Franck, and his own Polaris.

Adès’ first opera, Powder Her Face, has been performed all around the world, was televised by Channel Four, and is available on a DVD and an EMI CD. Most of the composer’s music has been recorded by EMI, with whom Adès has a contract as composer, pianist and conductor. Recently released to outstanding reviews, The Tempest is also available on an EMI CD. The disc was awarded the prestigious Diapason d’Or de l’année and Adès won the 2010 Classical Brit Award for Composer of the Year.

Adès’ most recent works include In Seven Days, a collaboration with video artist Tal Rosner, commissioned by the Los Angeles Philharmonic and London’s Southbank Centre, and Lieux Retrouvés, a work for cello and piano written for Steven Isserlis and commissioned by Aldeburgh Festival and Wigmore Hall. Adès’ music has attracted numerous awards and prizes, including the prestigious Grawemeyer Award (in 2000, for Asyla), of which he is the youngest ever recipient.

About Leila Josefowicz

An outstanding advocate and champion of contemporary music for the violin, Leila Josefowicz is a frequent collaborator of several leading composers, and works with orchestras and conductors at the highest level around the world. She has also been awarded a prestigious MacArthur Fellowship, joining prominent scientists, writers and musicians who have made unique contributions to contemporary life.

Violin concertos have been written especially for Leila Josefowicz by Colin Matthews, Steven Mackey and Esa-Pekka Salonen, while John Adams and Luca Francesconi have recently been commissioned to write new pieces for her. The latter will be given its world premiere by Josefowicz in February 2014 with Susanna Mälkki and the Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra. The Salonen concerto was first performed by Josefowicz with the Los Angeles Philharmonic conducted by the composer, before subsequent performances throughout Europe and North America. She also gave the premiere of Matthews’ Concerto with the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra before performing the piece with the Orchestre national de Lyon and the BBC Symphony and Finnish Radio Symphony orchestras.

During the 2013-14, season Leila Josefowicz performs John Adams’ Violin Concerto with the Sydney Symphony and Melbourne Symphony Orchestra, conducted by the composer. Elsewhere, she appears with the BBC Symphony, Finnish Radio Symphony and Toronto Symphony orchestras, the Orchestra della Scala, and the Orchestra Sinfonica Nazionale della Rai. In addition to her San Francisco Symphony performances, Josefowicz also has engagements this season with the Chicago Symphony and Baltimore Symphony orchestras, the Los Angeles Philharmonic, and National Symphony Orchestra. Josefowicz also appears in recital at London’s Milton Court Concert Hall and Handelsbeurs Concertzaal in Belgium.

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CPUC Should Fine PG&E, Orrick Law Firm Millions for Gas Pipeline Safety Cover-Up Says City of San Bruno

CPUC Should Sanction and Fine PG&E and its law firm Orrick Herrington & Sutcliffe and Attorney Joseph M. Malkin in Public Gas Line Safety Cover-up

San Francisco, Calif. – City of San Bruno officials this week called on the California Public Utilities Commission to sanction Pacific Gas & Electric’s legal team for deliberately covering up for PG&E after it used faulty records to determine that two Bay Area pipelines could safely operate – a decision demonstrating the continued problem with PG&E record keeping practices. Bad record keeping was one of the causes of the 2010 PG&E disaster in San Bruno and continues to threaten public safety.

In a filing late Sept. 26 with the CPUC in response to an order to “Show Cause Why It Should Not Be Sanctioned,” San Bruno asked that PG&E’s legal team, including top attorney Joseph M. Malkin of Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe, be sanctioned for discreetly filing an “errata” – the legal term for a minor correction – on the status of two pipelines, located in San Carlos and Millbrae, nine months after a gas leaked revealed those pipelines. The legal correction was made quietly on the afternoon of on July 3, 2013, a day before the CPUC took off for the July Fourth holiday, as a strategy to hide the fact that PG&E had relied on faulty records to determine the specifications for those pipelines to handle gas at high pressure.

Calling the July 3 filing by Malkin a “brazen and calculated act of damage control,” San Bruno attorneys say PG&E’s latest legal maneuver illustrates PG&E’s ongoing attempts to cover its tracks as it continues to use natural gas pipelines at inappropriate operating pressures, without accurate records and with the same flawed materials that caused a tragic explosion and fire in San Bruno that killed eight, destroyed 38 homes and damaged scores more.

“Gross negligence and bad recordkeeping by PG&E resulted in a fatal tragedy in our community, and now we’re discovering that PG&E is paying its legal team to perpetuate their deception at the risk of public safety,” said San Bruno Mayor Jim Ruane. “PG&E and its lawyers continue to play Russian roulette with people’s lives, and we are calling on the CPUC to issue sanctions and send the strong message that this behavior will not be tolerated. How many communities must endure tragedy before PG&E and our state utility regulators wake up and put safety first?”

Faulty recordkeeping was found to be a major contributor to the explosion and fire in San Bruno after federal and state investigators found that PG&E had maintained bad or nonexistent pipeline safety records for much of its 1,000+ miles of urban natural gas transmission lines. As a result, state regulators required PG&E to lower pressure on its other Peninsula gas pipelines until safety records could be verified.

In 2011, PG&E declared that the pipeline construction records were accurate for both Line 101, which runs from Milpitas to San Francisco, and Line 147, which runs in the San Carlos area. Based on PG&E’s representations, the CPUC allowed PG&E to increase the pressure back to pre-explosion levels.

In reality, PG&E’s pipelines were not rated to operate at higher pressure, as revealed after an October 2012 corrosion-related leak in San Carlos revealed seams in the pipeline previously not thought to exist. Yet, it took nine months for company attorneys to admit – by way of the subtle errata filing — that the records it had relied on to make that determination were faulty.

At a Sept. 6 hearing at the CPUC, state regulators pressed PG&E attorney Joseph Malkin over the “profoundly troubling” oversight, which occurred despite “the expenditure of hundreds of millions of dollars for record review and validation.” PG&E now faces fines of up to $250,000 for its mistake, on top of a possible $2.25 billion penalty and fine stemming from the fatal 2010 explosion and fire in San Bruno.

San Bruno officials say this is just the latest example of PG&E expending millions on top attorneys – more than $120 million by PG&E’s own admission – to subvert the truth and put profits over people.

At the Sept. 6 hearing, the PG&E legal team was selectively unresponsive to questions posed by the CPUC’s administrative law judges, invoking “attorney-client privilege,” which allowed them to dodge tough questions. Attorneys for San Bruno are asking that the CPUC conclude that PG&E waived its attorney-client privilege.

“Enough is enough. San Bruno will not sit by and watch PG&E willingly take advantage of public trust any longer,” Ruane said. “Three years after tragedy struck our community, we will continue to serve as a vigilant watch dog for public safety so that what happened in our community never happens again anywhere.”

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On Scene with Bill Wilson: Leather Week

 

The start of the 22nd Annual LeatherWalk

 

A spirited kick-off to Leather week in San Francisco – that week before Folsom Street Fair -  has been the LeatherWalk which starts at the Harvey Milk Plaza at Castro and 17thStreet and ends at the Eagle on 12th and Harrison with stops at several bars along the way.  Appropriately occurring on Sunday, the 22nd of September, this year’s LeatherWalk was the 22nd annual walk. The event raises funds for the Aids Emergency Fund and the Breast Cancer Emergency Fund.

 

 

Executive Director of Folsom Street Events, Demetri Moshoyannis

 

TUESDAY September  24 – Roxie Theatre (3117 – 16th Street) at 7 pm.

Celebrate the 30th Anniversary of Folsom Street Fair with a special Leather Week edition of Frameline Encore at this commemoration of San Francisco’s iconic kinky street festival! Join us for a sneak preview of the documentary FOLSOM FOREVER, plus a discussion with filmmakers and kinksters about Folsom Street Fair, its history, and its meaning to the leather community. Panelists: Mike Skiff, filmmaker, FOLSOM FOREVER, Race Bannon, Paul Lester, Gayle Rubin and Rachele Sullivan

This is a free event!

Please email RSVP@frameline.org or RSVP on Facebook to let us know you’ll be attending.

 Thursday September 26, 2013 The Armory at 1800 Mission 6 pm Admission $125.00

The Board of Directors of AIDS Emergency Fund has announced its choices for honorees at its 2013 annual event, “LEATHER and FEATHERS: AEF turns 31” to be held at the Armory on Thursday Sept. 26 at 6 pm. Hosted by Donna Sachet and Sister Roma with a special performance by Brian Kent  tickets include a VIP tour of the Kink.com Armory. Representing a cross-section of donors, volunteers and activists, the list continues a tradition dating back to 1987 of highlighting community heroes in the fight against AIDS. This year’s honorees are: 

• Empress Marlena (Garry McLain,) who has been active in the community for nearly 40 years, first as Empress of Modesto in 1976 and then as the 25th Empress of San Francisco. Retired owner of Marlena’s bar, she has raised hundreds of thousands of dollars for HIV/AIDS and LGBT causes over the decades. 

• Troy Brunet, outgoing president of the Castro Lions, proud member of Mama’s family and tireless fundraiser for AEF and other causes. Disabled by HIV/AIDS and along-time client of AEF, Troy make’s it his life’s calling to speak about his life on disability and to provide a face and voice for the marginalized in our community 

• Cynthia Hester, who recently stepped down after nine years of board service to AEF and BCEF – six as President. Prior to Board service, Cynthia had nearly a decade of operations experience captaining volunteer teams for the AIDS Ride and Avon Breast Cancer Walks. 

• Neil Figurelli, who has led AEF’s Christmas Eve Dinner committee for 25 years, and has recently completely nine years of Board service to AEF. Among his many accomplishments, Neil created This Old Bag, BCEF’s largest annual fundraising event

And as always for the past 30 years – ENJOY FOLSOM!

 

Harnessing fun at Folsom

 

 

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Chevron: “Game Over” in Ecuador Fraud Case with New Legal Ruling

An international arbitration tribunal yesterday issued a Partial Award in favor of Chevron (CVX) and its subsidiary, Texaco Petroleum Company (TexPet). The Tribunal found that the Settlement and Release Agreements that the government of Ecuador entered into with TexPet released TexPet and its affiliates of any liability for all public interest or collective environmental claims. The Lago Agrio plaintiffs’ lawyers have repeatedly admitted, and the relief in the Lago Agrio judgment makes clear, that their claims are exclusively collective and not individual. The arbitration stems from the government of Ecuador’s interference in the ongoing environmental lawsuit against the company and its courts’ failure to administer justice in a trial that has been marred by multiple instances of fraud.

“The game is up. This award by an eminent international tribunal confirms that the fraudulent claims against Chevron should not have been brought in the first place. It is now beyond question that efforts by American plaintiffs lawyers and the government of Ecuador to enforce this fraudulent judgment violate Ecuadorian, U.S., and international law,” said Hewitt Pate, Chevron vice president and general counsel. “Continuing to support this fraud only increases the government of Ecuador’s growing liability to Chevron and we urge Ecuador to reconsider its position and pursue a more responsible course.”

Convened under the authority of the U.S.-Ecuador Bilateral Investment Treaty and administered by the Permanent Court of Arbitration at The Hague, the Tribunal found that the Settlement and Release Agreements that the Government of Ecuador entered into with TexPet in 1995 and 1998 released TexPet and its affiliates of any liability for all public interest or collective environmental claims. In its decision, the Tribunal found that: 1) Chevron and TexPet are “Releasees” under the 1995 Settlement Agreement and the 1998 Final Release; 2) Chevron can invoke and enforce its contractual rights as a Releasee; and 3) the Government settled all public interest or collective environmental claims, including collective claims asserted by third parties.

This Award comes after the Tribunal’s February 2013 finding that Ecuador is in breach of its obligation to “take all measures necessary to suspend or cause to be suspended the enforcement” of the Lago Agrio judgment—an obligation that the Tribunal had imposed on Ecuador in 2011, andreinforced and expanded in 2012, but which Ecuador has continuously ignored. In prior rulings, the Tribunal put the Republic of Ecuador on notice that if Chevron’s arbitration ultimately prevails, “any loss arising from the enforcement of (the judgment) may be losses for which the (Republic) would be responsible to (Chevron) under international law.”

The next arbitration hearing regarding the collusion between the Ecuadorian courts and the Lago Agrio plaintiffs and their lawyers is scheduled for January 2014.

Chevron filed the international arbitration claim against the government of Ecuador on September 23, 2009, claiming violations of Ecuador’s obligations under the United States-Ecuador Bilateral Investment Treaty, investment agreements, and international law. Chevron’s subsidiary, TexPet, participated until 1992 as a minority member of a consortium that explored for and produced oil under contracts with Ecuador and Ecuador’s government-owned oil company, Petroecuador. Through the arbitration, Chevron seeks to hold Ecuador accountable for the denial of justice that occurred through the Lago Agrio court’s actions during the litigation and the issuance of the fraudulent $19 billion judgment.

Chevron Corporation is one of the world’s leading integrated energy companies, with subsidiaries that conduct business worldwide. The company is involved in virtually every facet of the energy industry. Chevron Corporation’s subsidiaries explore for, produce and transport crude oil and natural gas; refine, market and distribute transportation fuels and lubricants; manufacture and sell petrochemical products; generate power and produces geothermal energy; provide energy efficiency solutions; and develop the energy resources of the future, including biofuels. Chevron Corporation is based in San Ramon, California. More information about Chevron is available atwww.chevron.com.

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HBO Filming in Castro-Upper Market This Week

MUMC Members who were at our September 5 Members Meeting heard about plans for filming a new HBO cable series (working title “Looking”) in several parts of San Francisco, including The Castro this fall.  Filming begins in our area this week:

Tuesday, September 17 from 8:00am thru 3:00pm, inside Eros at 2051 Market.  Equipment trucks may arrive as early as 10:00pm on Monday 9/16.  To accommodate the project, “No Parking” will be posted on Market and 14th Streets between Church and Dolores, and the intersection of 14th and Church Streets.  Equipment trailers also will be parked on Hermann between Buchanan and Webster Streets.

Wednesday, September 18, from 11:00am thru 10:00pm inside The Cafe at 2369 Market.  “No Parking” will be posted for spaces in front of and adjacent to The Cafe, on the south side of Market between Castro and Noe Streets.  See also overlapping activity in the 400 Block of Castro Street, below.

Wednesday, September 18, from 12 noon thru 9:00pm (filming 5:00pm to 9:00pm) in the 400 block of Castro between Market-18th Streets) around Cafe Mystique (464 Castro). See also overlapping activity, above and below.

Wednesday, September 18, from 12:00 noon thru 9:00pm in certain areas on Noe Street between 14th-Market Streets and Duboce Avenue, to park equipment trucks and as an operations base for the day.  See also overlapping activity in the 2300 block of Market Street and 400 block of Castro, above.

We understand that the Producers have distributed information flyers about this work to residents and business in the affected areas.  All work is coordinated and permitted with the San Francisco Film Commission (415/554-6241) and S.F.  Police Department (415/553-7942).  If you have questions about the work, contact the Production Company’s Asst. Locations Manager, Heather McLean at 650/704-7624 or the Company’s Locations Office at 415/241-9031.

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On Scene with Bill Wilson: Cayuga Playground Opening

Eric Powell’s Cayuga Portal opening to the Cayuga Playground.

 

To walk through the recently reopened Cayuga Playground and view the sculptures by Demetrio (Demie)  Braceros is to experience art at its most powerful and accessible. In my life I have experienced that “ah” moment of reacting to art that takes the breath away several times. The one most memorable was my first view of Michelangelo’s DAVID. I literally had to stop and catch by breath as I turned and saw the larger than life sculpture before my eyes. That Michelangelo was able to take a block of marble and create such a moving piece left me in awe.

 

 

Natural wood and fallen logs become works of art at the hand of Demetrio Braceros.

  

I felt some of that same awe while walking around the Cayuga Playground looking at the sculptures by Demie. Some are very visible and others you miss if you don’t look close enough. They emerge from fallen logs or stand tall and proud on their pedestals. Yes, I dare to compare Michelangelo and Demie, because I believe it is the same vision. What some may see as a rock or a log, the artist sees a vision and brings that vision to life. I believe that both artists have succeeded because their work moved me.

 

Demie sits in his sculpted seat.

 

After having spent about 30 minutes just walking around and seeing the sculpture I realized that the opening ceremony was scheduled to begin in about ten minutes so I needed to head back toward the clubhouse. As I started down the walk who should I run into but the artist himself, Demetrio Braceros. So I followed him as he went around to look at his sculptures and to greet friends.  His joy was contagious and it was clear that he did his work with love.  

 

 

Demie and his self portrait as a Giant player.

 

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On Scene with Bill Wilson — Fond Farewell to Jose Sarria

A lifetime of memories on display at the viewing of Jose Sarria

It didn’t come so much as a shock, when one is ninety years old death isn’t an unexpected visitor. It just seemed a disappointment that what I knew was going to happen at some time was now a reality – Jose Julio Sarria would no longer take his annual trip to Colma to visit the grave of Emperor Norton as the Widow Norton. He would take just one more trip to be laid to rest in front of the grave of Emperor Norton beneath the tombstone marked with his name, Jose Sarria. There was now a final date to be added to the tombstone that for the past seven years had only a date of birth.

 

 

Empress Marlena

 It was a journey marked with dignity, pomp and circumstance starting with a viewing at the Halsted N. Gray-Carew & English Funeral Home on Sutter Street Thursday afternoon and evening. The open casket was draped with a rainbow flag on which a black sash imprinted with Empress Jose formed a base for one of his crowns.  The American flag stood to the left behind the coffin, the California flag to the right and two huge beautiful colorful large bouquets flanked the coffin. The banner on the left bouquet read “To our beloved Jose Emperors of San Francisco” the one on the right read, “To Our Beloved Jose Empresses of San Francisco.”

 

 Empress Galilea and the pallbearers before the procession into Grace Cathedral.

Royalty from Courts across the nation made their way to the funeral home. The reception room was filled with memorabilia, photos, gowns, crowns and paintings. It all stimulated conversations and memories as is the custom when a family gathers to say farewell to their patriarch or matriarch. Make no mistake we might not have shared common ancestors but Jose had a large family designated by love. They loved him as a father figure, a grandfather, a mentor, and some even as a fellow performer.

The funeral was scheduled to begin at Grace Cathedral at 11 am but people had already begun to gather at 9:30. As I was walking toward the California Street side entrance a woman came up to me and asked, “What is the event?” I must admit that I was tempted to say, “You think people dressed in drag is an event? – this is just San Francisco!” However I replied, “It is the funeral of Jose Sarria the founder of the Imperial Court System.” 

 

 Right Reverend Marc Andrus blessing the casket of Jose Sarria

 

It was certainly an event. The variety of crowns and gowns is probably unprecedented in the annuals of funerals at Grace Cathedral. The spectacular cathedral is a place where emotions and thoughts can soar. It was a perfectly fitting place for the final send off of Jose. The procession of clergy that preceded the casket included retired Episcopal Bishop Otis Charles and the service was presided over by Right Reverend Marc Handley Andrus. The living Emperors and Empresses of San Francisco followed the casket as it proceeded up the center aisle of the Cathedral.

 

State Senator Mark Leno was one of the speakers.

The speakers each admirably keep to the script of poignant memories sprinkled with a laugh or two. Certainly Jose’s life had provided enough material to make it possible. State Senator Mark Leno echoed the thought I had the night before as I realized that all the victories we have been celebrating this year – the SCOTUS ruling on Prop 8 and DOMA. In fact none of the victories we have had that have moved the GLBT movement forward would have been possible without that first person having the courage to stand up and say, “I’m gay and I’m okay. If you have a problem with that it’s your problem not mine.” Jose had that kind of courage He was the first openly gay man to run for public office – anywhere.   

           

 Motorcade to Woodlawn Cemetery in Colma

 “Going home, going home, I’m just going home.” The haunting strains of the 3rd movement of Dvorak’s New World Symphony echoed through the Cathedral as the procession returned down the center aisle. The casket, which was draped with an American flag, was again placed into the hearse.  A full police escort led a procession of sixteen cars and six buses to the Woodlawn Cemetery in Colma.

 

 Workers making the final adjustments.

 The brief ceremonies at Colma presided over by Jose Cisneros and Donna Sachet included a presentation of the American flag to Empress Galilea, a blessing by Reverends Beckman, Fox and Lewis of the San Francisco Night Ministry and a performance by the San Francisco Lesbian Gay Freedom Band. For people who had made the Trek to Colma while Jose was still alive, Robert Sunshine at the keyboard was a familiar sight. Donna Sachet sang the new verses written by Gail Wilson to the theme from “The Addams Family” appropriately named “The Norton Family”   

 

The final spot.

 

 

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Drakes Bay Oyster Company Remains Open and Will Petition for Rehearing by Ninth Circuit’s Full Eleven Judge Panel

The historic oyster farm and last oyster cannery in California announced today that it plans to file a petition requesting that their case be reheard in front of a full eleven-judge panel of the Ninth Circuit. Drakes Bay Oyster Company has assured its supporters that this is not the end for them and has pledged to continue the fight to remain open.

The farm announced that, within 45 days, it will file a petition for an En Banc rehearing.  In the meantime, the farm remains open for business.

The small, family-owned farm, which has been in a heated legal battle with federal regulators for its survival, is adamant that the majority opinion got it wrong. “After reading the Court’s decision — and especially the dissent from Judge Watford — we are more convinced than ever that we will prevail based on the merits of our case” said Kevin Lunny, owner of Drakes Bay.

While the Ninth Circuit’s three-judge panel ruled 2 to 1 yesterday against the oyster farm, the company believes the dissenting opinion of Judge Paul J. Watford was absolutely correct.  In that dissenting opinion, the Judge admonished the majority’s decision, asserting that it consisted of “hand waving,” containing “nothing of any substance” and that “Drakes Bay is likely to prevail on the merits” (see pg. 47 from the Ninth Circuit decision).

In his dissent, Judge Watford also agreed with the oyster farm that, in enacting the 1976 Point Reyes Wilderness Act, “all indications are that Congress viewed the oyster farm as a beneficial, pre-existing use whose continuation was fully compatible with wilderness status” (see pg. 44 of the decision).  Only recently, he observed, did the Interior Department “bizarrely” change position and insist that the law required the oyster farm to leave in 2012 (see page 43 of the decision).

Drakes Bay remains optimistic that the farm will be successful in the next stages of its legal battle. “With the support of thousands of environmentalists, community members and elected leaders around the nation, we will continue to fight for what’s right and remain committed to succeeding in our fight to remain open and serve our community,” Lunny said. “Although we strongly disagree with the panel’s decision, we remain steadfast in our opinion that we can prevail based on the merits of our case,” Lunny said.

About Drakes Bay Oyster Company

Oyster farming in Drakes Estero, located in Point Reyes, Marin County, has been part of the region’s history for nearly 100 years. The Lunnys, a fourth-generation ranching family, purchased Drakes Bay in 2004 to revive a historical part of the local community and ensure the continued environmental health of Drakes Estero.  Drakes Bay currently employs nearly 30 community members, and farms sustainably in Drakes Estero, producing approximately one-third of all oysters in California. The Lunny family works hard to participate in keeping the agricultural economic system in West Marin alive. Drakes Bay actively participates in the creation of a more sustainable food model that restores, conserves, and maintains the productivity of the local landscapes and the health of its inhabitants. For more information, please visit www.drakesbayoyster.com.

 

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Drakes Bay Oyster Co: Judge Slams Majority Opinion, Calls it a “Hand Waving” decision

INVERNESS, CALIF. — Owners of the Drakes Bay Oyster Company today said they strongly disagree with the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeal’s decision to eject the historic oyster farm, and that attorneys for Drakes Bay are now reviewing all options before announcing the farm’s plans moving forward.

The Ninth Circuit’s three-judge panel ruled 2 to 1 today against the oyster operation, with Justice Paul J. Watford writing a dissenting opinion in support of the oyster farm. In the dissent, Watford wrote that Drakes Bay should have prevailed on its claim that Secretary Salazar’s decision was, “arbitrary, capricious or otherwise not in accordance with law.” Watford also stated that the majority opinion consisted of “hand waving” containing “nothing of any substance”, and that the injunction should have been granted (see pg. 47 from the Ninth Circuit decision).

The well-loved oyster farm asked the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals to prohibit the Federal Government from ejecting Drakes Bay from its property, destroying its business and taking away the jobs of its 30 employees before the case was even fully litigated.

“As community farmers and environmentalists, we continue to hold firmly in our belief that we have taken the appropriate measures to protect and preserve the waters of Drakes Estero and the wildlife that calls the National Seashore home,” said Kevin Lunny, owner of Drakes Bay.

For years, Drakes Bay has been fighting against false science and unsupported accusations from the Interior Department and the National Park Service in their attempts to close down the farm.  In a decision made last November, then-Interior Secretary Ken Salazar refused to issue a permit to allow Drakes Bay to continue farming upon the expiration of its 40-year-lease. The lease allowed the farm to operate on public land within the Point Reyes National Seashore, which was created decades after the oyster farm’s inception.

Drakes Bay asserts that the Ninth Circuit panel failed to consider several critical issues in their decision. Drakes Bay alleges that Salazar illegally determined that the Estero’s “potential wilderness” designation prevailed over Congress’ more recent direction, which authorized the renewal of the farm’s permit due to the fact that Salazar’s decision relied heavily on scientific misconduct and false science.

“The Ninth Circuit’s decision to deny this injunction is a step backwards not only for Drakes Bay, but also for Marin County, proponents of sustainable agriculture and farmers around the country. Our attorneys are now reviewing all of our options before we announce our plans moving forward.” Lunny said.

About Drakes Bay Oyster Company

Oyster farming in Drakes Estero, located in Point Reyes, Marin County, has been part of the region’s history for nearly 100 years. The Lunnys, a fourth-generation ranching family, purchased Drakes Bay in 2004 to revive a historical part of the local community and ensure the continued environmental health of Drakes Estero.  Drakes Bay currently employs nearly 30 community members, and farms sustainably in Drakes Estero, producing approximately one-third of all oysters in California. The Lunny family works hard to participate in keeping the agricultural economic system in West Marin alive. Drakes Bay actively participates in the creation of a more sustainable food model that restores, conserves, and maintains the productivity of the local landscapes and the health of its inhabitants. For more information, please visit www.drakesbayoyster.com.

 

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America’s Cup Race Jury Decision Makes Oracle Team USA Underdog in Most Contested America’s Cup in History

 

Oracle Team USA Now Is The Underdog in Most Heated America's Cup in History

 

An international jury has levied the harshest penalties in the 162-year history of the America’s Cup, docking defending champion Oracle Team USA two points in the finals against Emirates Team Zealand and expelling a key sailor.

The penalties announced against the syndicate Tuesday are for illegally modifying prototype boats in warmup regattas last year and earlier this year.

Oracle Team USA must win 11 races to retain the silver trophy. Team New Zealand must still win nine races in the series, which starts Saturday on San Francisco Bay.

Dirk de Ridder, who trims the wing sail, is barred from sailing in the regatta, and two shore crew members also have been expelled. Grinder Matt Mitchell has been barred from the first four races.

Oracle Team USA also was fined $250,000.

“The rules infractions involved only a few of our 130 team members, and were done without the knowledge of either our team’s management or the skippers who were driving the boats,” said team CEO Russell Coutts in a statement. “While we disagree with the unprecedented penalties imposed by the Jury, we have no choice but to make the necessary changes to personnel on our race boat and do our best to use the next four days for the new team to practice and get ready for the start of the 34th America’s Cup.”

The scenario creates the most hotly contested America’s Cup race in the storied history of the sport, clearly placing the Oracle Team USA as the underdog in the series against Emirates Team Zealand.  Despite the stupidity of Team USA members for participating in the boat weighting affair, the hard lesson learned has created a more than healthy rivalry with the Kiwi team.

The Kiwi team and the New Zealand media may have overplayed their hand and protested too much, creating an animosity with the American team.  American’s fight best when they are down, and they are assuredly down now, having lost three members of their team and two match points.

The New Zealander team has been together for four years and now the Oracle Team USA has only been selected and together for four days.  That’s quite a contrast, and, combined with the jury’s penalties, puts them in a fight, win or die position.  And, it also adds excitement and a new angle to what has been, up until now, a rather lackluster sporting event in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Hand it to Larry Ellison. Even when his team screws up, they make the best and most exciting things out of it.

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America’s Cup: Is Emirates New Zealand Team Celebrating America’s Cup Jury Decision Too Soon?

America’s Cup: Jury Rigged?

The level of glee by the Emirates New Zealand  team and news media over foibles of Oracle Team USA has taken such a decidedly nasty turn that members of the International Jury have delayed their decision over what penalties, if any, should be given to defending America’s Cup champion team in the “weighting scandal.”

Clearly, Oracle Team USA made a serious mistake. Who in Hell puts weights on a ship to make it go faster? And, who in Hell does it in “pre-season” matches when it doesn’t matter in scoring America’s Cup races?

It was a stupid move by someone/s on Team USA, but it shouldn’t impact the most sought after silver trophy in the World, The America’s Cup.

But the New Zealand team, and the media down-under, have gone “John Bull Mad” over the alleged scandal and created such an ugly scene they have brought disrepute on themselves as much as Team USA. It’s embarrassing to read the ‘homer” news copy from the Kiwis.

The N.Z. media’s fawning stories about the “cheating scandal” and how it has harmed the sport are hogwash.  The America’s Cup is always controversial and the Kiwi’s namby-pamby media patter has made the entire sport look amateurish, low-class and soft.

The jury should make its decision and it should be fair and square–something that has not been so far with leaks from the Jury and other questionable allegations making their way into the media.

The Jury’s pending decision should not be delayed any longer and the decision must be commensurate with the alleged wrong doing: if no harm and no impact was had on the America’s Cup race itself, why should any of the sailors or Team USA be penalized? Really?

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