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Koret Foundation Lawsuit Heats Up: New Website, Ads Call for Return to Founder’s Charitable Mission

Koret  Contributions to Hoover Institution, Polish Jewish Museum, Slammed by Koret Widow–Says Tad Taube, Anita Friedman of JCFS, Richard Green of Radovsky Green, Others, Use Charitable Funds for Own Pet Projects

President of Koret Foundation

Tad Taube, Ex-President of Koret Foundation

Partner of the San Francisco law firm Greene, Radovsky, Maloney, Share & Hennigh

Richard L. Green, Partner at law firm Greene, Radovsky, Maloney, Share & Hennigh

Jewish  Family and Children's Services

Jewish Family and Children’s Services, Anita Friedman

San Francisco—A new website seeks the support of Bay Area organizations and individuals to join the fight to reclaim the Koret Foundation and restore it to the Jewish, humanitarian, and community-oriented mission intended its founder, Joseph Koret. The website started this week and is at

Mrs. Susan Koret, Joseph Koret’s widow, filed a lawsuit in October 2014 against the Koret Foundation’s current Board of Directors for ignoring the wishes of her late husband to help the poor and disadvantaged in the Bay Area and supporting Jewish causes in the Bay Area and Israel. The suit alleges, among other things, that the Foundation’s directors have diverted millions in Foundation dollars to grantees outside of the Bay Area and Israel and other grantees directly associated with their own personal interests – including causes in former President Tad Taube’s native country of Poland.

Mrs. Koret is seeking to restore a more egalitarian foundation structure, whereby organizations in the San Francisco Bay Area and Israel can seek funding consistent with her husband’s intent.

Many organizations stand to gain from this reform and the new website,, encourages those interested in joining this effort to sign up in support.

“Mrs. Koret claims in her lawsuit that the current directors are shortchanging the people of the Bay Area and Israel who most need the help that her husband intended his legacy to provide, and that community support will be positive for a restored mission,” said Rob Bunzel, an attorney for Mrs. Koret.

Mrs. Koret’s lawsuit demands the removal of board members Tad Taube and his longtime legal counsel Richard L. Greene of Greene Radovsky Maloney Share & Hennigh LLP; co-president Anita Friedman, director of Jewish Family and Children’s Services; co-president Michael J. Boskin, Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution; board member Richard Atkinson, former president of the University of California; and board member Abraham D. Sofaer, Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution. The suit calls for their replacement with the appointment of an independent board with a majority of Jewish directors.

The suit claims the Koret board is using foundation funds to promote programs closely affiliated with individual board members and is purposely confusing the public by putting signage that prominently features Taube’s name alongside the Koret Foundation name on buildings and grants for which the Koret Foundation is the principal funder.

The lawsuit also claims that, at Taube’s direction, the Koret Foundation has donated approximately $9 million to the Museum of the History of Polish Jews in Warsaw, a pet project of Taube, who was born in Poland.  “While the Polish Museum commemorates significant Jewish history, the diversion of Koret funds to Poland is not in keeping with my husband’s charitable mission…and in effect drains funds that could benefit the needy in communities in the Bay Area and Israel,” the lawsuit states.

“Alleviating suffering and misfortune were my husband’s top priorities,” said Mrs. Koret when the lawsuit was filed. “Joe and Stephanie’s money shouldn’t be used for Tad Taube’s pet projects in Poland or to help conservative economic and policy think tanks–not when so many in the Bay Area go to bed hungry every night and Jewish causes need support.”

Mrs. Koret noted her husband was a native of Odessa, Russia, who immigrated to America, struggled growing up poor in the U.S., and then struck it rich later in life in clothing and real estate. He was deeply committed to humanitarian causes such as alleviating hunger,  and would “be deeply angered and offended by Tad Taube and the board’s strong support of conservative  causes and grants that divert money needed for the local community and Jewish causes.”

The lawsuit asks the court to prevent the spending down of the Foundation’s assets by Taube and the board members with whom he has surrounded himself and allow the appointment of a new, independent board to carry out its mission and save the Foundation.

Mrs. Koret was named a lifetime director and chairwoman of the Foundation prior to her husband’s death in 1982. She was entrusted by her late husband to carry out the family legacy of caring for the poor and supporting Jewish and community causes through the Koret Foundation, according to the lawsuit.

Mrs. Koret said she has been marginalized as Taube, a Silicon Valley real estate investor, and his hand-picked supporters on the board steer donations toward causes in which they have affiliations.

Mrs. Koret said she filed the suit as a last resort after her efforts to diversify the board, get independent legal advice, confirm the perpetual nature of the Foundation and redirect funds back to her late husband’s mission were rebuffed.  She fears the Koret Foundation is facing destruction of its mission and eventual collapse unless changes are made.

The lawsuit alleges that Taube is a shameless self-promoter who has personally selected board members to rubber stamp his decisions in exchange for support of their own pet projects. Additionally, the suit says Taube established his own foundation, called Taube Philanthropies, but uses money and staff from the Koret Foundation to pay for and enhance joint projects of Taube Philanthropies and the Koret Foundation. A review of the Koret Foundation’s public filings shows reported annual salaries and compensation of officers exceeded $1.9 million in 2011, while Taube Philanthropies showed no such expenses for the same period, according to the lawsuit.

Mrs. Koret’s lawsuit charges that out of the $79 million gifted by the Koret Foundation between 2010 and 2013, nearly 60 percent was spent on causes outside the stated mission of her husband, the late Joseph Koret.

Learn more about the lawsuit and recent developments by visiting

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Warriors Plans for S.F. Arena Slammed by UCSF National Academy of Sciences Leaders


 Mission Bay Proposal is “Disaster” for Life Sciences, UCSF

Leaders Call on S.F. Mayor Ed Lee to Abandon Proposed Arena and Protect Biotech/Life Sciences in S.F. from “Critical Harm”

Joe Lacob and Peter GuberJoe Lacob and Peter Guber Asked to Abandon Mission Bay Warriors Plans to Protect Live-Saving Research, Science

San Francisco – A coalition of world-renowned scientists from the University of California at San Francisco and the U.S. National Academy of Sciences today said the proposed Golden State Warriors’ Arena in Mission Bay would be a “disaster” for the City’s growing biotech and life science hub and called for San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee to abandon the proposed plans.

The UCSF scientists joined the California Nurses Association and the Mission Bay Alliance, a coalition of UCSF employees, stakeholders and neighbors who oppose the 18,500-seat arena and entertainment center, in their decisive opposition of the proposed project, saying it would threaten “the entire future of UCSF as the center of a world-class academic/biotech/medical complex.”

“Our major fear is that the Mission Bay site will lose its appeal – not only for the new biomedical enterprises that the city would like to attract here, but also for most of its current occupants,” according to the letter, which was delivered to Mayor Lee and signed by more than 20 of UCSF’s leading scientists and researchers.

“The result could critically harm not only UCSF, but also the enormously promising, larger set of biomedical enterprises that currently promises to make San Francisco the envy of the world,” the letter said.

The letter sites traffic gridlock as a leading concern for both residents accessing UCSF’s emergency services and for the hospital workers and scientist and researchers who have turned Mission Bay into one of the most “prominent academic-industry biotechnology/medical complexes in the world.”

“It is unavoidable that terrible, and possibly even life-threatening, traffic congestion will be associated with the planned complex, given that it is intended to be the site of some 220 events per year, held both in the evening and during the day,” wrote the scientists. “Many of us have experienced the hours-long gridlock that paralyzes all Mission Bay streets before and after San Francisco Giants home games. The absolute paralysis that it creates is already a non-trivial problem, which the planned stadium promises to both greatly expand and intensify.”

The UCSF faculty who signed the letter are among the most prestigious and acclaimed scientists in the world and include Bruce Alberts, UCSF Chancellor’s Leadership Chair for Biochemistry and Biophysics for Science and Education, who is the former president of the National Academy of Sciences, a membership organization of the world’s leading scientists and Noble Prize winners.  Other signatories include:

  • Elizabeth Blackburn, Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics, and Nobel laureate
  • James Cleaver, Professor of Dermatology and Pharmaceutical Chemistry
  • John A. Clements, Professor of Pediatrics and Julius H. Comroe Professor of Pulmonary Biology, Emeritus
  • Robert Fletterick, Professor of Biochemistry, Pharmaceutical Chemistry, and Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology
  • Carol Gross, Professor of Microbiology
  • Christine Guthrie, Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics
  • Lily Jan, Professor of Physiology, Biochemistry and Biophysics
  • Yuh-Nung Jan, Professor of Physiology
  • Alexander Johnson, Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, and Biochemistry and Biophysics
  • Cynthia Kenyon, Emeritus Professor, UCSF, and Vice President, Aging Research, Calico Life Sciences
  • Gail Martin, Professor Emerita, Department of Anatomy
  • Frank McCormick, Professor Emeritus, UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer CenterDavid A. Wood Distinguished Professorship of Tumor Biology and Cancer Research
  • Ira Mellman, Professor (Adjunct) of Biochemistry and Biophysics
  • William J. Rutter, Chairman Emeritus, Department of Biochemistry, and Chairman, Synergenics LLC
  • John Sedat, Professor Emeritus, Department of Biochemistry & Biophysics
  • Michael Stryker, William Francis Ganong Professor of Physiology
  • Peter Walter, Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics
  • Arthur Weiss, Professor of Medicine, and of Microbiology and Immunology
  • Zena Werb, Professor of Anatomy

The scientists said special traffic routes proposed to protect UCSF employees would not work.

“Those of us at Mission Bay have experienced the unruly behavior of frustrated drivers stuck for long times in traffic jams,” they wrote. “In fact, there is no believable transportation solution for two very large complexes placed in such close proximity at Mission Bay.”

Bruce Spaulding of the Mission Bay Alliance said he commended the courage of UCSF’s preeminent scientists and researchers for taking a stand and protecting the growth of Mission Bay’s biotech and life science community.

“These concerns are consistent with those shared by Mission Bay Alliance and the healthcare employees, neighbors and others who recognize what a disaster this project would be on the thousands of people and budding industries in this growing community,” Spaulding said. “This is a significant community and a quality of life issue in San Francisco.  We hope the Mayor recognizes the danger to public health and life sciences of this ill-conceived project.”

Anchored by UCSF’s new, $1.6 billion hospital and research campus, Mission Bay has given rise to San Francisco’s flourishing life science and biotech industry, generating nearly $4 billion in economic activity, $1.4 billion in income and 21,000 jobs.

The City’s Mission Bay project – the largest ongoing biomedical construction project in the world – can be credited for the City’s biotech success and would be jeopardized by the proposed stadium.

“We face increasing competition from other rapidly growing complexes of this type, both in the US and abroad,” the scientists wrote. “It will be critical to keep moving aggressively forward, if we are to continue to attract the very best talent – both academic and private sector – to SanFrancisco….We are seriously concerned that this future is threatened by the plan to construct a very large sports, entertainment, and event arena in our midst.”

 About the Mission Bay Alliance

 The Mission Bay Alliance is a coalition of UCSF stakeholders, donors, faculty, physicians and the working men and women of San Francisco who are concerned about the impact of the proposed Golden State Warriors’ stadium on the future of the vibrant community and medical campus at Mission Bay. The Alliance fully supports the Warriors’ team and congratulates its tremendous championship win. However, the Alliance believes the proposed arena and entertainment center is ill-conceived for this site. For more information about the Mission Bay Alliance, visit

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True Leaders at the Presidio Trust: Nancy Bechtle, William Hambrecht, Charlene Harvey: Editorial

1 presidio trust

San Francisco should be justly proud of the independent and visionary leadership of outgoing Presidio Trust President Nancy Hellman Bechtle and board members William Hambrecht and Charlene Harvey.   Their hard work, independence and dedication to serving the public deserves praise from every San Franciscan and California resident.

During their tenure, and because of their leadership–along with the guiding hand of recently retired Presidio Trust Executive Director Craig Middleton–the Presidio is financially self-sufficient and a thriving example of public-private partnerships that exemplify the very best in public parks, recreation and conservation in the World today.

In the face of overwhelming political pressure, these individuals and other Trust board members Paula Robinson Collins and Alex Mehran created new opportunities for San Franciscans, Californians and visitors to access one of the great treasures of American parks—The Presidio. Our Presidio.

And, just recently, the leadership of these individuals was demonstrated for everyone to see: they unanimously stood up to megalomaniac billionaire Star Wars director George Lucas, whose proposed vanity museum would have been a disgrace to San Francisco and the Presidio Trust.  Through open hearings, transparency and fairness their process concluded that not only should Lucas’s horrific design be rejected, but that two other competing proposal should turned down as well.

They took this action against the political and social pressure of Mayor Ed Lee, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, and Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi.  That, in itself, is no small feat. They also stood strong against venture capitalist Ron Conway, who became a one man sycophant for Lucas and his museum.  Even now, in defeat, Ron Conway continues to embarrass himself by claiming a conspiracy against George Lucas.

We believe and hope that new members Lynne Benioff, Nicola Miner, Janet Reilly, and John Keker will continue to keep the independent leadership exhibited by Bechtle, Hambrecht and Harvey alive.  The legacy left by Bechtle, Hambrecht and Harvey is an important milestone in San Francisco and Presidio history.  And, it is something that would have made Congressman Philip Burton, who championed the Presidio’s preservation, very proud.


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Paul Hobbs Winery, Sonoma County Beat Back Attack On Vineyard Protection Law

Paul Hobbs Winery Joins Sonoma County in Victory Over Activist Lawsuit to Repeal Landmark Sonoma County Vineyard Development Rules

Paul Hobbs Helps Sonoma County Win Victory
Sonoma, Calif.,–A lawsuit threatening long-standing Sonoma County environmental regulations was dismissed today in a ruling by the Sonoma County Superior Court.

The ruling upholds Sonoma County’s 15-year-old Vineyard Erosion and Soil Control Ordinance (VESCO), thereby preserving the county’s clearly defined standards for protecting soil, water and air during vineyard development.

This represents a significant victory for Sonoma County and responsible farming advocates, including Paul Hobbs, who was named in the suit. A small activist group targeted Hobbs’s 39-acre Watertrough Road property as the test case in their campaign to subordinate County vineyard regulations to the oft-abused statewide regulations of the California Environmental Quality Act, more commonly known as CEQA.

“We are relieved and thankful that this attack on VESCO was thrown out,” said Hobbs spokesman Christopher O’Gorman. “The results of this suit could have been devastating both for farmers and the environment. Now we can continue to grow and thrive, responsibly.”

The suit, brought by a small parent group called the Watertrough Children’s Alliance, hinged on whether VESCO should be considered a “ministerial” or “discretionary” ordinance. Today’s ruling underscored the prevailing view that VESCO is a ministerial ordinance, meaning that CEQA does not come into play during vineyard development.

This comes as a relief to local winemakers, as the environmental review process triggered by CEQA is notorious in California for being abused by activists to delay and add significant cost to projects large and small.

“The impact of CEQA review would be very negative for Sonoma County agriculture, as has been noted by the Sonoma County Winegrape Commission and many others” said O’Gorman. “This ruling protects Sonoma farmers, Sonoma’s environment, and Sonoma’s economy.”

With this court’s final word on this legal question, Hobbs is happy to return his full attention to farming and winemaking.

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S.F. Archbishop Cordileone Priest Joseph Illo was Focus of Abuse Lawsuit: Star of Sea School Parents Demand Removal


Ft. Joseph Illo: Emotional Abuse Lawsuit Comes to Light

Ft. Joseph Illo: Emotional Abuse Lawsuit Comes to Light–Star of Sea Parents Demand Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone Remove Priest

Canonical and court documents have come to light from 2003 and 2005 that cast a negative light on the ministry of Priest Joseph Illo during his time in the Stockton, Calif., diocese — including a court ruling that he inflicted “intentional emotional distress” on an 11-year-old girl — have further enraged parents at San Francisco’s Star of the Sea School who have sought the priest’s removal as Star of Sea Parish administrator, according to news stories on KGO Radio and in the National Catholic Reporter and the San Francisco Examiner.

“We do not want Father Illo around children or in our community,” said Christy Brooks, a Star of the Sea parent.  “The details of this past lawsuit are deplorable. There is no one, who after reading this lawsuit, would want to have their children near Father Illo.  Archbishop Cordileone should remove him immediately from our school and parish. The safety and well-being of our children must be paramount.”

“We believe Archbishop Cordileone was aware of this verdict against Ft. Illo for intentional infliction of emotional distress on a child and still knowingly placed him in our community with foresight and knowledge of his history.  That is shocking and unforgivable,” Brooks added.  She and a group of parents from Star of the Sea have written and phoned the Archbishop demanding Illo’s removal.

The facts of the 2005 lawsuit against the priest, Father Illo, which required him to pay $14,000 for therapy for the young girl he traumatized, are as follows:

An 11-year-old girl came to Father Joseph Illo in confidence to report an incident of sexual abuse by one of the priests in Illo’s parish in Modesto.

Upon listening to the child’s report of abuse, Father Illo responded by yelling at the child, calling her a liar and calling the character of the child’s mother into question.

Father Illo then invited the offending priest into his office, where the two of them further confronted the child.

It was only after Father Illo invited his secretary in the room and she found the child in a hysterical state that she was removed and the mother was called.

Father Illo has a sworn duty to immediately report all allegations of abuse to the police.

As part of the case, church documents detailing an internal canonical investigation were subpoenaed. This report raises questions about Father Illo’s leadership and referring to his personality as being “dictatorial, manipulative and insensitive.” Another report for the court in Modesto said Father Illo had “a Jekyll and Hyde” personality. The canonical report recommended counseling for Father Illo.

Controversy has dogged Father Joseph Illo since he was appointed by San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone to Star of the Sea Parish and School in late 2014.  After taking charge of the San Francisco parish he banned altar girls, saying only boys can be altar servers. The move sparked criticism along with his statements to parents that he planned on replacing the school’s teachers with nuns from Dominican Sisters of Mary, Mother of the Eucharist order, the same nuns that walked out on students at Marin Catholic High School last week to protest an event to prevent bullying of LGBT youth.

The Star of the Sea parents have contacted Archbishop Cordileone and his staff by mail and phone and have “respectfully demanded that Father Illo be immediately and completely removed from his involvement at Star of the Sea,” according to the Star of the Sea parents group.

Just earlier this month, Bishop Robert Finn, head of the Kansas City-St. Joseph, Mo., diocese resigned after a canonical review of Finn to determine if he violated church law by failing to report suspected child sexual abuse in connection to former priest in that diocese.  Many parents are wondering if the same fate will befall Archbishop Cordileone since he placed Father Illo at Star of the Sea school with the knowledge that Father Illo had a history of emotional abuse of children.

Prominent Catholic leaders have written Pope Francis and took out a full page advertisement in the San Francisco Chronicle requesting the Pontiff remove Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone for “fostering “an atmosphere of division and intolerance.”





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April 24 – May 3 throughout San Francisco, East Bay, North Bay and South Bay

Bay Area Dance Week (BADW) invites the public to explore the vibrant world of the Bay Area dance community through more than 400 free events for the dance lover, casual dancer and those curious to learn. From dance studio to proscenium stage, city park to street corner, dance is everywhere during this fun-filled 10-day festival.

Completely free of charge, hundreds of dance organizations, companies, schools and artists open up their doors welcoming the public to attend an event during Bay Area Dance Week. Presented during and as part of the nationwide festival National Dance Week, the Bay Area’s edition has grown to be the nation’s largest celebration. BADW draws more than 20,000 attendees each year to events in San Francisco, the East Bay, North Bay and South Bay.

This year’s festival runs April 24-May 3, 2015, kicking off with the now traditional One Dance led by the Rhythm & Motion Dance Workout Program at Union Square on Friday, April 24 at 12noon. Anyone can participate in One Dance, learning a short dance sequence featuring iconic dances to pop songs from the 1970s to today. The public can go online to preview the steps at, attend a live rehearsal, or just show up at Union Square and wing it.

The Union Square opening event will also honor the recipients of the 2015 Dancers Choice Award and the Della Davidson Prize.

The 8th annual Dancers Choice Award goes to the Oakland-based bellydance duo Etang Inyang and Tammy Johnson, of Raks Africa. Specializing in Egyptian style bellydance, the duo have performed together for over a decade, produced award-winning work, and collectively have over 35 years of experience working with youth and communities of color.  Dancers’ Group awards the Dancers Choice Award to individuals and organizations that are finding effective and creative models that impact dance.  The community recommends recipients through an open call for nominations each year – past award winners include Danica Sena (2014), Sarah Crowell (2013), Della Davidson & Ernesto Sopprani (2012), Antoine Hunter (2011), AXIS Dance Company (2010), Alleluia Panis (2009) and Jessica Robinson Love (2008).

The Della Davidson Prize honors the life and work of Bay Area dance luminary Della Davidson, who passed away in 2012. An annual prize of $1,220 (in honor of Della’s birthday 12/20) is awarded to a choreographer/dance-maker producing work in the spirit of Ms. Davidson. This year’s recipient is Deborah Slater. A Bay Area native, Slater’s body of work lies in the intersection of performance, cultural studies and social change. Slater is the founder/Artistic Director of Deborah Slater Dance Theater, a company dedicated to the production of evening-length works exploring timely social issues. Past Della Davidson Prize award winners include Debby Kajiyama (2014), Randee Paufve and Monique Jenkinson (2013).

With over 400 events to choose from, there is something for everyone at BADW.  The public can pick up a free event guide or visit to explore free events including dance classes, open rehearsals, performances and more. A few festival highlights include:

• A Brazilian Carnaval – dance to live percussion exploring the rhythms of Samba, Afro-Brazilian and more; Friday, April 24 at the Mission Cultural Center for Latino Arts in San Francisco
• A high energy teen hip hop class where beginners can learn pop-locking, breaking and freestyling, presented by ODC School & Rhythm and Motion; Friday, April 24 in San Francisco
• An introduction to International Folk Dance led by the Santa Rosa International Folk Dancers – no partner necessary; Thursday, April 30 in Santa Rosa
• An all-ages Freestyle Community Dance celebrating free expression and a spirit of generosity presented by Soul Sanctuary Dance; Sunday, May 3 in Berkeley

• The Blossom Festival, featuring fun, participatory folk dances from around the world, hosted by the Folk Federation of CA; Sunday, April 26 in San Francisco
• A performance by Kathy Mata Ballet featuring live accompaniment and multiple dance styles including musical theater, traditional Chinese dance, lyrical fusion, and more; Sunday, April 26 in San Francisco
• A dance along class for children ages 3-7 at Ballet San Jose followed by an inside look at an open rehearsal of Ballet San Jose’s Cinderella; Tuesday, April 28, Wednesday, April 29 and Thursday, May 1 in San Jose
• An all-ages class covering basic capoeira moves and traditional Portuguese music led by ABADÁ-Capoeira; Thursday, April 30 in San Francisco

• An Afro-Columbian dance class with Adriana Sanchez of Colombian Soul, featuring traditional dances from the Pacific Coast of Colombia; Saturday, April 25 in San Francisco
• A West African Funk dance class led by Dimensions Dance Theater; Wednesday, April 29 in Oakland
• A workshop of International Folk dance by the Stanford International Dancers, featuring a dance party and live music; Friday, May 1 in Palo Alto
• A one-hour class focusing on traditional Nordic Folk Dances followed by a dance party with live music, hosted by the Nordic Footnotes; Saturday, May 2 in Menlo Park

• A Modern Essentials Dance Workout – learn the fundamentals of contemporary dance, breaking down a few favorite routines at ODC School & Rhythm and Motion; Friday, May 1 in San Francisco
• A series of classes at the Breema Center geared towards basic sensing, focusing and consciously experiencing the meaning of personal breath movement; Saturday, April 25, Monday, April 29, Friday, May 1 and Saturday, May 2 in Oakland
• Lessons in Biodanza®, a practice aimed to reconnect to your inner joy and awaken your desire to be fully alive; Saturday, April 25, Monday, April 27, Tuesday, April 28 and Thursday, April 30 in Berkeley, Oakland and San Rafael
• Dance on the Brain – a conversation presented by ODC with dance artists and medical professionals exploring the amazing physiological and psychological benefits of dance; Sunday, May 3 in San Francisco


• sjDANCEco Festival- a showcase of the wealth and diversity of South Bay dance artists. Over 60 groups from all across the Bay Area will gather for a day-long outdoor performance; Sun, Apr 26 in San Jose

• Rotunda Dance Series – A prelude performance to 95 RITUALS, to premiere in July by inkBoat and guests, dedicated to Anna Halprin for her 95th birthday; Fri, May 1 at City Hall in San Francisco

• SF Ballet Company Class –  A behind the scenes look at San Francisco Ballet, the oldest professional ballet company in America. Sat, May 2 in San Francisco
• Dance & Interactive Technology Playground – A playground for dancers, visual designers, film makers, computer geeks and all people with curious minds interested in exploring connections between art and interactive technology hosted by Kinetech Arts Open Lab; Tue, Apr 28 in San Francisco

• Move to the Now – Hosted by Amy Seiwert’s Imagery and Post:Ballet this intimate evening of exhilarating dance, music and art explores performance in the non-traditional setting of 111 Minna; Fri, Apr 24 in San Francisco
• Free to Fly – Aerial company BANDALOOP takes a wide range of contemporary dance styles into the air with rock climbing technology and rigging; Sun, Apr 26 in Oakland
• Awaken Your Inner Carnaval Showgirl – Awakening movements with Showgirl Shaman & Carnaval Queen Kellita. Wed, Apr 29 in San Francisco

Full details, including exact times and locations are available online at


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North American Same-Sex Ballroom Competition in Oakland

April Follies returns to Just Dance Ballroom on April 25 to host the 2015 North American Same-Sex Dancesport Championships.  Now in its 13th year, the annual competition and show is the largest and longest running Same-Sex Dance competition in North America.

“We have a fast-growing community of same-sex dancers in the Bay Area,” according to Barbara Zoloth, April Follies Board Member.  “Many of our couples go on to international same-sex competitions like the Gay Games and the Out Games.”

All levels will compete during the day beginning at 10:00 am.  Dance Styles include International Standard and International Latin, American Smooth and American Rhythm.  This year, due to high demand, there will be expanded competition for Argentine Tango and Country Western dances.

An onsite community dinner will follow the daytime events.  The day-long competition culminates with a dance lesson for attendees and new dancers, followed by the A-level finals and dance performances by the top-rated couples in the evening.

The evening A-Level Finals are part of an extravaganza and show that includes performances by several of the country’s top same-sex couples and performance teams representing studios from all over North America.

Following the show and final competition, there will be an open social dance for all.

Tickets are $15 (daytime events only), $25 (evening event only), or $35 for the entire day.   A community dinner is also available for purchase.  Reduced pricing is available if purchased early. For further information, please visit, follow us on Twitter @April_Follies, or friend us on Facebook [].


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San Francisco Archbishop Cordileone “Morality Clause” Respectfully Criticized in National Catholic Publication by S.F. City Attorney

San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera Respectfully Criticizes Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone

San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera Respectfully Criticizes Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone


San Francisco’ top legal officer today published an opinion piece in the National Catholic Reporter newspaper that was respectful to San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone, but also challenged his stand on loyalty oaths and morality clauses for Catholic teachers, calling the Archbishop’s  move “high-handed and wrong.”

San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera wrote “To me, San Francisco’s recent controversy threw into stark relief the challenges that make Pope Francis’ leadership so vitally important at this moment in our church’s history. Progress is desperately needed to renew our church’s mission to serve the world rather than scold it and to emphasize teaching that young Catholic consciences will recognize as legitimately Christlike.”

“So when church ideologues express disdain for contemporary society (as Cordileone often does) or bring disproportionate emphasis to the catechism’s most discriminatory and divisive elements (as Cordileone did last month), it risks losing a generation of Catholics quite unlike anything has before,” Herrera wrote.

Herrera’s respectful, but bold statement sent an arrow through the heart of the Archbishop’s stated arguments about why the loyalty oath for teachers is necessary in his opinion.

The Archbishop is fast becoming a pariah in San Francisco. He has grown distant from the parishioners, Catholic grade school and high schools, as well as San Francisco’s top Catholic families, all of whom have banded together to protest his loyalty oath.

There is a discreet, but fast growing grassroots movement against the Archbishop and it is hard to imagine how quickly he has lost both power and prestige in the Bay Area.  He is badly damaged as a leader and seems to be sinking in his own morass.  Now, with one of the top Catholic elected leaders in Northern California weighing in against him, he has no chance of success.

On top of the Archbishop’s rebuke by Herrera, the Teacher’s Union representing high school teachers said it will not accept his language as part of any of its collective bargaining agreements.  And, to add insult to injury, grade school parents at the historic Star of the Sea school are revolting against the Archbishop’s handpicked parish priest, Ft. Joseph Illo.

Illo started an international controversy by banning Altar Girls at Star of the Sea, removing Filipino women who had served for generations on the church altar, refusing to give blessing to non-Catholics and passing out an inappropriate sex pamphlet to second through sixth graders.

Lastly, City Attorney Herrera may have gotten the best line off in this entire debate: the San Francisco Chronicle reporter Kevin Fagan reported “Asked if he (Herrera) felt heinous as a man who has officially and unofficially promoted ideals so contrary to Cordileone’s moral code, Herrera paused for a moment while he carefully picked his words.

“Let’s just say I know I’m not gravely evil,” Herrera said.

The archdiocese had no comment on Herrera’s essay, the Chronicle reported.

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Erin Bregmanon’s The Lady Onstage, Readings March 9 & 10
Monday, March 9, 7:30pm at ROBLE HALL, STANFORD UNIVERSITY.
Tuesday, March 10, 7pm at TIDES THEATRE, SAN FRANCISCO,
533 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94102

Playwrights Foundation and the National Center for New Plays at Stanford present the Winter/Spring Rough Readings Series, the 10th annual monthly developmental showcase of brand new work in its early draft form. Bringing playwrights and theatergoers together in an intimate setting each month to showcase work that is still at a very early stage of development. Playwrights Foundation Artistic Director Amy Mueller remarks, “The Rough Readings Series has been an important springboard for so many powerful projects. Katori Hall’s The Mountaintop got one of its very early readings on the series, for example. It’s a place where the writers can work out something difficult, but crucially important.”

March features a reading of The Lady Onstage, by Erin Bregmanon:
Monday, March 9, 7:30pm at ROBLE HALL, STANFORD UNIVERSITY. &
Tuesday, March 10, 7pm at TIDES THEATRE, SAN FRANCISCO, 533 Sutter Street, San Francisco,

In The Lady Onstage playwright Erin Bregmanon takes us into the psyche Olga Knipper, leading actress of the Moscow Art Theater in Chekhov’s day, and gives us an inside perspective on the radical choices artists make in the name of Art and Love at the moment when theater changed forever.

Playwright Erin Bregman’s work has been produced by Just Theater, Playground, and Washington DC Source Festival. She has been a finalist for the Princess Grace award and the Global Age Project and was a nominee for the Pony Fellowship in 2009. Her work has been developed around the country, including the Bay Area Playwrights Festival and Playground. She is currently a company member of 2by4, PlayGround, and 6NewPlays, and the recipient of a grant from the SF Arts Commission for a musical collaboration with composer Alex Stein. She is an alumnae of Playwrights Foundation’s Resident Playwrights Initiative. Her play A Bid to Save the World was featured in the 2013 Rough Reading series and has gone on to be produced at the Washington DC Source Festival in 2014.

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S.F. Archbishop Cordileone Flip Flops on Catholic School Teacher “Morality Clause”

Parents, Teachers, Students, Alumni at Catholic Schools React to SF Archbishop’s Latest Statements:

“Nothing Has Changed”

Star of the Sea School Parents Mount Effort to Overturn Changes at Grade School

1 Arch best pix 

San Francisco—Concerned parents, students, teachers and alumni of Bay Area Catholic high schools today released the following statement regarding Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone’s proposed “morality clauses” for teachers and other staff:

“The San Francisco Chronicle today published an editorial stating that Archbishop Cordileone will no longer attempt to reclassify teachers and staff at four Catholic high schools as “ministers.” While it is true that he is no longer using that word, it is a mistake to believe that he has backed off his effort to reclassify teachers and other staff as ministers who would be exempt from anti-discrimination and other workplace protections. He has not. The Archbishop is still proposing that the teachers and other staff are ‘called to advance this religious mission’ and that their work is ‘ministry.’ This is not a meaningful change from the Archbishop’s previous proposal. The teachers want to be classified as teachers – and nothing else.

The Archbishop has also made no move to retract the language condemning members of our community by labeling their lives as ‘gravely evil.’ In fact, in a February 24, 2015 media advisory, his Archdiocesan spokesperson stated that ‘Nothing already planned to go in is being removed or retracted or withdrawn.’

The Archbishop is also now proposing to establish a committee of theology teachers ostensibly to help clarify the proposed handbook language. His formation of a handpicked committee gives the false impression of openness to dialogue, and gives him cover for speech that is very harmful to our children, faculty, staff and community.

We are concerned that Archbishop Cordileone was ‘surprised at the degree of consternation’ over his proposed changes to the collective-bargaining agreement and faculty handbook.  This clearly shows he is out of touch with his flock, with his teachers, with his parents, and with his alumni. We believe the solution is straightforward. We ask the Archbishop to cease in his attempt to reclassify the teachers as anything but teachers, and to use the current faculty handbook which has been in place and successfully utilized for years by Catholic high school administrators and staff.

We will remain steadfast in fighting for the elimination of handbook language which in any way would make our children, teachers or staff members feel unwelcome, unsupported or unsafe in our schools. We will insist that the employment rights of all teachers and staff be respected.”

Students will rally on Friday, March 6, from 5:30 – 6:30 at St. Mary’s Cathedral Plaza to celebrate the bedrock Catholic values of acceptance, love and justice. A forum to include parents, students and theologians is also planned for Monday, March 16 at the University of San Francisco. A number of parents and parishioners plan to boycott the Archbishop’s Annual Fundraising Appeal by either giving nothing or donating only a token $1 donation.

A full version of the Archbishop’s interview with the San Francisco Chronicle editorial board is available at

San Francisco parents at Star of the Sea School are also concerned over recent changes at the beloved neighborhood Catholic grade school where Archbishop Cordileone has installed one of his own, Father Joseph Illo.  Father Illo unilaterally ended a tradition of Altar Girls at the school and church and handed out pamphlets to second graders that “asked questions such as, “Did I perform impure acts by myself (masturbation) or with another (adultery, fornication and sodomy)?” and, “Did I practice artificial birth control or was I or my spouse prematurely sterilized (tubal ligation or vasectomy)?” as well as, “Have I had or advised anyone to have an abortion?” The Cordileone appointed  priest is also evicting homeless mothers and children from the Star of the Sea’s facilities that were the recipient of a grant from founder and his wife Marc and Lynne Benioff.  Parents at the school are mounting an effort to undo changes made by Father Illo and Archbishop Cordileone there.



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With a program of three acclaimed works new to Bay Area audiences, Joffrey Ballet returns to Berkeley’s Zellerbach Hall onSaturday, March 14 at 8:00 p.m. and Sunday, March 15 at 3:00 p.m. Two West Coast premieres include local luminary Val Caniparoli’s Incantations (2012), set to music by minimalist composer Alexandre Rabinovitch-Barakovsky and rising star choreographer Alexander Ekman’s multimedia work, Episode 31 (2011). The Bay Area premiere of Stanton Welch’s Son of Chamber Symphony (2012) is set to composer John Adams’s weighty score of the same name. Both Welch and Caniparoli’s dances were created specifically for Joffrey Ballet, and Ekman has adapted the video component of his production to showcase company dancers.

Joffrey Ballet members will participate in residency activities on campus and in the community, including a pre-performance talk on Saturday, March 14 at 7:00 p.m. in Zellerbach Hall; this talk is free to event ticketholders.

The arc of Val Caniparoli’s most recent work for the Joffrey, Incantations, is a long, meditative spiral, inspired by the slowly percolating minimalism of its musical score and Caniparoli’s interest in contemplation and prayer. Stanton Welch’s Son of Chamber Symphony meets John Adams’s rhythmically restless score with a mix of classicism, virtuosity and exuberant theatricality. Episode 31, by Swedish choreographer Alexander Ekman, first premiered in New York and is an imaginative work of dance-theater that channels urban dance into the context of contemporary ballet, beginning with frenetic energy before simmering into an intimate duet.

For more than half a century, Chicago’s Joffrey Ballet has been celebrated for its definitive and influential brand of American ballet, bringing impeccable technique and a youthful, daring spirit to contemporary works and restaged classics.  Founded by Robert Joffrey in 1956, and guided by choreographer Gerald Arpino from 1988 until 2007, Joffrey Ballet continues to thrive under its current Artistic Director Ashley Wheater. The company expresses its longstanding commitment to accessibility through a rigorous touring schedule, a robust education program including Joffrey Academy of Dance, and collaborations with myriad visual and performing arts organizations. Noted for its many “firsts,” Joffrey Ballet was the first American ballet company to appear on television, as well as the first and only dance company to appear on the cover of Timemagazine. The troupe was also the subject of Robert Altman’s 2003 film, The Company.


Tickets for Joffrey Ballet on Saturday, March 14 at 8:00 p.m. and Sunday, March 15 at 3:00 pm. in Zellerbach Hall range from $40.00 to $96.00 and are subject to change. Half-price tickets are available for UC Berkeley students. Tickets are available through the Ticket Office at Zellerbach Hall, at (510) 642-9988,, and at the door. For more information about discounts, go to


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SF Tribal and Textile Arts Show Opens Feb. 5


Excitement by collectors and fans of tribal, ethnographic and textile arts is building as two major tribal and textile arts shows are coming to San Francisco.

The annual San Francisco Tribal and Textile Arts Show at Fort Mason opens Feb. 4 and runs to Feb. 8.  The exhibition is the leading art fair devoted to the arts of tribal cultures in the U.S. and presents a comprehensive selection of international galleries representing the arts of Asian, Oceanic, African, Native American and Latin American indigenous peoples.

The 80 participating galleries will open from 6 to 9 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 5 for a sneak preview benefiting the DeYoung Museum Oceanic, African and Americas Department.  Opening night tickets cost $150.  This event features live music by Pacific Chamber Jazz, cuisine by McCalls Catering, and early access to the show.

The show opens to the public at 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday Feb. 6 and runs through Sunday, Feb.8.  Tickets are $15.

Some of the world’s leading galleries and dealers of tribal arts will be exhibiting at the show: Wayne Heathcote, Jack Sadovnic Indonesian Art , Michael Hamson Oceanic Art, Bruce Frank Primitive Art, Robert Brundage Himalayan Art, Cathryn Cootner, Marc Assayag African & Oceanic Art, Jim Willis Tribal Art, Thomas Murray Ethnographic Art, Mark A. Johnson Tribal Art, Steve Berger Art Textile, Mehmet Çetinkaya Gallery, Joel Cooner Gallery,  Patrick & Ondine Mestdagh,  Pascassio Manfredi Gallery, John Ruddy, James Stephenson,  Ernie Wolfe Gallery, Jewels, Robert Morris Fine Art, Jacaranda Tribal, Farrow Fine Art Gallery, Miranda Crimp, Gary Spratt, Taylor Dale Tribal Art, Gebhart Blazek, Peter Boyd, Chris Boylan Oceanic Art, Galen Lowe Art & Antiques,  Anavian Gallery, Galerie Arabesque,  Bryan Reeves, and others.   


A special tour of the show by Cathryn Cootner, emerita curator of textiles at the DeYoung, and a respected collector, author, lecturer, and tribal art dealer, is back by popular demand, as a tour guide leading “The Delight of Looking Closer.”  Cootner’s tours will be at 9 a.m. on both Friday Feb. 6 and Feb. 7 and cost $40 per person.

For more information or tickets, call 310.305.4543 or visit:

The second event that is generating excitement in the tribal world is the opening of the DeYoung Museum’s exhibition of Masterworks of African Figurative Sculpture from the collection of Richard H. Scheller. The exhibition runs Jan. 31 to July 5.

A number of the works from the extraordinary collection assembled over the past 30 years by Scheller, a biochemist and executive at Genentech, are being gifted to the Museums in 2013 and 2014, and the Museums will receive additional gifts from the collection in the future.  These will enhance one of the world’s most important collections of Oceanic Art, the John and Marcia Friede collection, which is already exhibited at the DeYoung. This new addition of African art, combined with the Friede Oceanic collection, makes San Francisco one of the world’s premier museums of tribal art and keeps it at the forefront of presenting art that showcases the diversity of the world.


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Leslie Hatamiya To be Appointed First Executive Director of San Bruno Community Foundation

The Board of Directors of the San Bruno Community Foundation will consider final action to appoint Leslie Hatamiya as the Foundation’s first Executive Director effective Feb. 1. Ms. Hatamiya, a San Bruno resident, led the California Bar Foundation as its Executive Director from 2004 to 2012.

“The San Bruno Community Foundation presents a unique opportunity to benefit San Bruno’s dynamic, diverse, and resilient community over the long term,” said Ms. Hatamiya. “I would be honored to help build the Foundation into a valuable community resource that supports all of San Bruno.”

A graduate of Stanford University and Stanford Law School, Ms. Hatamiya has more than two decades of experience in building organizations and programs. Over seven years, Ms. Hatamiya transformed the California Bar Foundation into a vibrant center of philanthropy for California’s legal community.  She rebuilt the Board of Directors, developed a growing fundraising program, launched a highly successful scholarship program to increase diversity in the legal profession, sharpened its grant-making strategy, spearheaded a remake of its brand and public image, and strengthened its relationship with the State Bar of California. While at the California Bar Foundation, Ms. Hatamiya earned recognition as one of the “Best Lawyers Under 40” from the National Asian Pacific American Bar Association.

Prior to joining the California Bar Foundation, Ms. Hatamiya served as chief of staff and director of corporate communications and special projects at wireless broadband startup SOMA Networks; ran the Coro Fellows Program in Public Affairs in San Francisco; and helped build former U.S. Senator Bill Bradley’s 2000 presidential campaign as a deputy campaign manager. Recently, she staffed the John Paul Stevens Fellowship Foundation and launched the “Vote with Your Mission” campaign for the California Association of Nonprofits. She has also held positions at Stanford University, Yale University, with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, and in Senator Bradley’s Capitol Hill office.

Ms. Hatamiya has been a longtime Stanford University volunteer, including service on the University’s Board of Trustees, the Alumni Association’s Board of Directors, and the National Advisory Board of the Haas Center for Public Service, which she chaired. She is also the author of Righting a Wrong: Japanese Americans and the Passage of the Civil Liberties Act of 1988, a publication of Stanford University Press.

Since moving to San Bruno in 2003, Ms. Hatamiya has been an active member of the community as a PTA leader, a volunteer for San Bruno Pee Wee Baseball, and a past AYSO soccer coach. Her ties to San Bruno reach back to World War II, when her mother and grandparents were among the Japanese Americans interned at the assembly center on the site of what are now the Shops at Tanforan.

“Ms. Hatamiya has wide-ranging experience in the public, nonprofit, political, and private sectors,” commented Nancy Kraus, Board President. “She has the perfect combination of experience, energy, vision, and sense of the community to lead the Foundation forward in its important work.”

The San Bruno Community Foundation was established by the San Bruno City Council to administer, for the long-term benefit of the San Bruno community, $70 million the City received in restitution from PG&E after the 2010 gas pipeline explosion in the City.

The Board-appointed Search Committee to fill the Executive Director position included Directors Dr. Regina Stanback-Stroud, Frank Hedley, and Board President Nancy Kraus. The recruitment process spanned several months led by the nationally recognized firm, The 360 Group.



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Michael Tilson Thomas (MTT) leads the San Francisco Symphony (SFS) in the West Coast premiere of Cynthia Lee Wong’s Carnival Fever—a co-commission that is part of the SF Symphony’s New Voices project with the New World Symphony and Boosey & Hawkes—January 21-23 in Davies Symphony Hall. The program also features pianist Yefim Bronfman in Brahms’s Piano Concerto No. 2 in B-flat major, as well as Berg’s Three Pieces for Orchestra.
New Voices is a creative partnership between MTT, the San Francisco Symphony, the New World Symphony, and music publisher Boosey & Hawkes that annually commissions works from an emerging composer. Each New Voices composer writes one chamber work and one orchestral work that are further developed and premiered with MTT and the New World Symphony, followed by the West Coast premieres performed by the San Francisco Symphony. Publisher Boosey & Hawkes also provides New Voices composers with professional development and guidance that are essential to a young composer’s career. Cynthia Lee Wong is the second New Voices composer, following Zosha di Castri as the inaugural recipient in May 2012. In April 2014, Ted Hearne was announced as the third New Voices composer.
Cynthia Lee Wong’s orchestral work Carnival Fever received its world premiere with Michael Tilson Thomas and the New World Symphony in April 2014. Later this season, her chamber work Snapshots—which premiered with NWS players in November 2013—will receive its West Coast premiere on March 6 and 7 at SoundBox, the SF Symphony’s new late-night, experimental music series.
Cynthia Lee Wong says that Carnival Fever was influenced by “’The Carnival at Rome’ from Alexander Dumas’s The Count of Monte Cristo. Young Albert (the unknowing target of Monte Cristo’s machinations) and his friend Franz experience a carnival, which commences only moments after a grisly public execution in the same piazza. Although the Count, who had invited the young men to witness the scene, responds to the execution by “burst[ing] into a laugh,” he remains unmoved throughout the festivities. In contrast, Albert and Franz are “seiz[ed]” by the “general vertigo” and are “like men who, to drive away a violent sorrow, have recourse to wine, and who, as they drink and become intoxicated, feel a thick veil drawn between the past and the present.’”
Born in New York, Cynthia Lee Wong has attracted international acclaim for her “impressive energy and drive” (The Boston Globe), “extravagant variety of sound” (Süddeutsche Zeitung), and “unsettling…dark, eerie…highly individual sound universe” (The San Diego Union-Tribune). Her creative output encompasses a range of genres, including works for orchestra, chamber ensemble, dance, voice, narrator, musical theatre, and piano improvisation. Past commissions include Memoriam (2011) for Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, Three Portraits (2005) and On Baldness and Other Songs (2007) for the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, Piano Quartet (2010) for the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival and La Jolla Music Society, and String Quartet No. 1 (2009) for Tanglewood Music Center. She has also worked with the Tokyo String Quartet, the Orchestra del Teatro Olimpico in Vicenza, Italy, New Juilliard Ensemble, the Juilliard Orchestra, and the Cincinnati College-Conservatory Orchestra.
Wong is a graduate of the accelerated 5-year Bachelor-Master program at the Juilliard School. She studied composition with Samuel Adler, Milton Babbitt, David Del Tredici, David Olan, and Larry Thomas Bell, as well as piano with Tatyana Dudochkin, Frank Levy, and Martin Canin. From 2006-2008, she taught music theory and composition at the New England Conservatory Preparatory School. She has been a faculty member at CUNY’s Baruch College since 2008. In 2012, she participated in the BMI musical theatre workshop, and in 2013, Wong joined the board of the League of Composers, the nation’s oldest organization dedicated toward new music. Wong is a Ph.D. Enhanced Chancellor’s Fellow at the Graduate Center at the City University of New York.
Pianist Yefim Bronfman has been a regular guest artist at the San Francisco Symphony since his debut in 1981. He last performed with the SFS in September 2013 in Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto No. 1, with Michael Tilson Thomas conducting. Bronfman began the 2014-15 season with appearances at summer festivals including Aspen Tanglewood, Vail, and La Jolla and a residency at the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival. Other appearances this season include performances with the symphonies of Chicago (with whom he also appears in Carnegie Hall), Saint Louis, Dallas, Seattle, Atlanta, and Pittsburgh, the New World Symphony, Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, and the Berlin, New York, and Los Angeles Philharmonics. He performs Magnus Lindberg’s Piano Concerto No. 2 with the Gothenburg Symphony and the London Philharmonic. With the Cleveland Orchestra and Franz Welser-Möst, he will play and record both Brahms Piano Concertos; he also performs Brahms at La Scala with Valery Gergiev. Bronfman was nominated for a Grammy award in 2014 for his recording of Lindberg’s Piano Concerto No. 2 with the New York Philharmonic on the Da Capo label. His 2009 Deutsche Grammophon recording of Esa-Pekka Salonen’s Piano Concerto with Salonen conducting was also nominated for a Grammy. His other recordings include DVDs with the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra and the Berlin Philharmonic, and CDs of Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto No. 1 with the Bavarian Radio Symphony, the recital disc Perspectives, and recordings of Beethoven’s Piano Concertos and the Triple Concerto with Gil Shaham, Truls Mørk, and the Zurich Tonhalle Orchestra for the Arte Nova/BMG label.

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The San Francisco Symphony (SFS) and an all-star lineup of guest artists celebrate Music Director Michael Tilson Thomas’s (MTT) 70th birthday with a special concert on January 15, 2015. The festive program honors MTT’s distinguished career as a conductor, pianist, and composer. The evening’s concert is centered around Liszt’s Hexameron for Six Pianos and Orchestra, featuring MTT in a once-in-a-lifetime collaboration with five of today’s foremost pianists: Yuja Wang, Jean-Yves Thibaudet, Emanuel Ax, Jeremy Denk, and Marc-André Hamelin. While MTT joins the performance as the sixth pianist, conductor Teddy Abrams—a former member of the SF Symphony Youth Orchestra, former Conducting Fellow and Assistant Conductor at the New World Symphony, and current conductor of the Louisville Orchestra—leads the SFS and soloists in this work. Dinner and after-party packages are also available for this special event. Proceeds from the celebration benefit the SF Symphony’s diverse community and education programs, initiatives that have been a hallmark of MTT’s tenure as Music Director.

On the occasion of his 70th birthday and amidst the celebration of his 20th season as Music Director of the SFS, MTT said, “I still feel like very much the same person. My outlook on life, my idealism, wanting to work with people in a way that is collaborative—I think those are very much the same. The music, and the opportunity to work with great orchestras and musicians day in and day out gives me the most energy and joy.”

In addition to Hexameron, each of the five guest pianists take solo turns with the orchestra during the performance: Jean-Yves Thibaudet performs Gershwin’s Sweet and Low Down with SFS Principal Bass Scott Pingel and Principal Percussion Jacob Nissly; Thibaudet also joins Jeremy Denk in Schubert’s Marche caractéristique; Marc-André Hamelin performs the third movement of Shostakovich’s Piano Concerto No. 2; Emanuel Ax plays the Andante of Mozart’s Piano Concerto No. 21; and Yuja Wang joins the Orchestra in Litolff’s Scherzo from Concerto symphonique No. 4, a work she also performs on the SF Symphony’s Masterpieces in Miniature recording, recently released on the Symphony’s own SFS Media label. The program also includes works by Bizet, Tchaikovsky, Rossini and Bernstein, and the audience will be treated to special appearances by Beach Blanket Babylon and other surprise guests.

Guests looking for an elevated experience may purchase “MTT Birthday Dinner” packages that include premium concert seating, a pre-concert cocktail reception and dinner in the Wattis Room and SoundBox—the SF Symphony’s new experimental concert venue in Zellerbach A Rehearsal Hall—and an exclusive after-party with birthday treats, also in SoundBox. Proceeds from the Birthday Dinner support the SF Symphony’s community and education programs, which annually serve over 75,000 Bay Area children. Also central to the MTT birthday celebration is a special campaign to support the acquisition of fine stringed instruments for use by members of the Orchestra.  Long a priority for MTT and the SFS, a number of generous donors, patrons, and friends are supporting the instrument acquisition through the newly created Michael Tilson Thomas 70th Birthday Fund.

The MTT Birthday Dinner is chaired by William Fisher, Marcia Goldman, and Nellie Levchin, and is sponsored by Franklin Templeton Investments and Wells Fargo. The Birthday Dinner menu is created by Alice Waters and prepared by McCall’s Catering. Décor at the Birthday Dinner is provided by Blueprint Studios.



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December 15 & 16, 2014
2781 24th Street, San Francisco

Playwrights Foundation (PF) and the New York-based company The One-Minute Play Festival are thrilled to announce the final casting for the 5th Annual SF One-Minute Play Festival (#1MPF), December 15th and 16th, 2014 – an evening of 86 brand- new one-minute plays by a highly vaunted group of 50 Bay Area playwrights, all written within the past month specially for the event.

Headlining the festival are popular, local artists such as Marilet Martinez, Tina D’Elia, Andre Abrahamians, Anne Hallinan, Ariel Leasure,Scott Ragle, Monica Ho, Aejay Mitchell, as well as featured playwright Ignacio Zulueta – double-dipping as an actor. They are paired with talented Bay Area directors to perform 86 different 60-second works by such Bay Area luminaries as Peter Nachtrieb, Chris Chen, and Aaron Loeb, with distinguished emerging artists including Erin Bregman, Megan Cohen, Nathan Yungerberg, and Elizabeth Spreen. To celebrate its 5th anniversary, the festival is being upgraded to the beautiful Brava Theater Center, 2781 24th Street, San Francisco, in the heart of the Mission District. This venue, dedicated to the spirited Bay Area cultural scene with an emphasis on diverse voiced, is located along the city’s most vibrant arts and cultural corridor and provides the perfect ambiance for the celebratory nature of the #1MPF.
The SF #1MPF is a partnership with the New York-based company The One-Minute Play Festival, which now is a national movement. Through this annual event, each community where the festival takes place celebrates the singular voices of local playwrights who have their fingers firmly planted on the pulse of the region’s cultural zeitgeist.
Mr. D’Andrea, founder of the #1MPF, attests to the strength of the Bay Area’s theater community: “Having had the opportunity to work with the Bay Area artistic community over the past six years, I’ve observed a strong and present sense of community and a dedication to the craft and practice of theatre-making that’s truly unique and wonderful.” PF’s artistic director Amy Mueller reflects that, “These 50+ playwrights represent a new and undeniable force of creativity that is changing the landscape of our community life, and taps the rich diversity of voices and history that exists in our city.”

Now in its fifth consecutive year in San Francisco, the #1MPF brings the Bay Area ‘s new play community together to create a whirlwind of theater, a celebratory and inspirational evening during the holidays for the community to stamp the season with the Bay Area’s unique cultural thumbprint. With over 100 local artists participating, audiences will get a full meal of delicious little bites.

The 5th Annual San Francisco One-Minute Play Festival will take place for two performances only, on Monday, December 15th & Tuesday, December 16th at 8pm at
Brava Theater Center, 2781- 24th Street in San Francisco. Parking available in a paid lot on 24th Street/Potrero, behind the SF General Hospital, and metered on the street.
General Admission is $18 online, or in advance at the Brava Theater Box Office, 12p- 6p M-F; and $25 at the Door. VIP Tickets for $36 include reserved, best seats and drinks of your choice. Tickets are currently on sale at For more information please visit
About Playwrights Foundation
Founded in 1976 by Robert Woodruff, the Playwrights Foundation is now recognized as one of the top new play developmental centers in the country and the only one of its size and scope on the West Coast. Playwrights Foundation supports and champions contemporary playwrights in the creation of new works to sustain theater as a vital, dynamic art form. PF actively fosters the creative process of playmaking and the dissemination of new works to national theater producers, while sustaining a commitment to the playwright, whom we regard as the creative wellspring of the theater. Since its inception in 1976, PF has served more than 475 writers at all levels of their careers, providing indispensable resources and support for the development of their work, and connecting them to theaters interested in producing new plays. Our program alumni, first discovered early in their careers, include some of the most prominent names in contemporary theater, including include Sam Shepard, Anna Deavere Smith, Paul Vogel, David Henry Hwang, and others.
Our mandate is to offer a full range of programs that provide multiple points of entry for a diverse range of playwrights—at a low cost or free of charge—so they can readily access our services, take advantage of our expertise, recourses, and connections across the nation, while learning from their artistic peers.
About The One–Minute Play Festival (#1MPF)
#1MPF is America’s largest and longest continually running theatre festival, founded by Producing Artistic Director, Dominic D’Andrea. #1MPF is barometer project, which investigates the zeitgeist of different communities through dialogue and consensus building sessions and a performance of many moments. #1MPF works in partnership with theatres sharing playwright or community-specific missions across the country, creating locally sourced playwright-focused community events, with the goal of promoting the spirit of radical inclusion by representing local cultures of playwrights of different age, gender, race, cultures, and points of career. The work attempts to reflect the theatrical landscape of local artistic communities by creating a dialogue between the collective conscious and the individual voice.
In each city, #1MPF works with partnering organizations to identify programs or initiatives in each community to support with the proceeds from the work. The goal is to find ways give directly back to the artists in each community. Supported programs have ranged from educational programming, youth poetry projects, teaching artists working in prisons, playwright residencies and memberships, and community arts workshops.
Annual partnerships have been created with theaters in over 20 cities including: New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago, Trenton, Atlanta, Philadelphia, Washington, DC, Baltimore, Boston, Miami, Minneapolis, New York, Seattle, Dallas, Austin, Indianapolis, Cincinnati, Anchorage, and more, with partnering institutions like Primary Stages, Victory Gardens Theatre, Cornerstone Theatre Company, The Playwrights Foundation, Boston Playwrights Theatre, Actor’s Express, InterAct Theatre, Mixed Blood, Passage Theatre, Phoenix Theatre, Kitchen Dog, Salvage Vanguard, ScriptWorks, ACT Seattle, Perseverance Theatre, and others.

To learn more about the SF One-Minute Play Festival and the Playwrights Foundation, visit the Playwrights Foundation website

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New Century Chamber Orchestra pair with San Francisco Girls Chorus

New Century and San Francisco Girls Chorus make debut at Green Music Center

at Sonoma State University December 12 

Music Director Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg and the New Century Chamber Orchestra welcome the holiday season with a program of beloved classical favorites and traditional Christmas carols December 12 and December 18-21, featuring Salerno-Sonnenberg as soloist in Vivaldi’s Winter from The Four Seasons and the ensemble’s first collaboration with the San Francisco Girls Chorus. December 12 marks New Century’s debut at Weill Hall in Green Music Center at Sonoma State University.

The December concert program, which New Century will also perform in San Francisco, Berkeley, Palo Alto, and San Rafael, features the orchestra with the San Francisco Girls Chorus in Mozart’s Engel Gottes Künden, John Rutter’s Nativity Carol, Handel’s Hallelujah and For unto us a child is born from Messiah, and a medley of Christmas carols, arranged by former Featured Composer Clarice Assad. The chorus, under the artistic direction of Lisa Bielawa, will perform Vaughan Williams’ “Winter” from Folksongs of the Four Seasons and Cesar Antonovich Cui’s Radiant Stars. The program will also feature the orchestra in Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No. 3, Handel’s Arrival of the Queen of Sheba from Solomon, and Corelli’s Concerto Grosso in G minor, Christmas Concerto.

Concerts take place Friday, December 12 at 7:30 pm at Weill Hall at Green Music Center in Rohnert Park; Thursday, December 18 at 8 pm at First Congregational Church in Berkeley; Friday, December 19 at 8 pm at First United Methodist Church in Palo Alto; Saturday, December 20 at 8 pm at Nourse Auditorium in San Francisco, and Sunday, December 21 at 5 pm at the Osher Marin Jewish Community Center in San Rafael.

New Century’s collaboration with San Francisco Girls Chorus is the latest in its expanding circle of diverse and distinguished musical guests. This season, Featured Composer Derek Bermel performed four concerts with the orchestra in September and is writing a newly commissioned work to be performed in May 2015. Former longtime New York Philharmonic Concertmaster Glenn Dicterow leads the orchestra in four concerts in March 2015. During the 2013-14 season, the orchestra performed two highly-successful first time collaborations: Atlantic Crossing with Chanticleer, and Donizetti’s one-act opera Rita with San Francisco Opera Adler Fellows Efrain Solis, Maria Valdes, and Thomas Glenn.

Tickets for the December 18-21 concerts are $29 to $61 and can be purchased on the New Century website at, through City Box Office at, or by calling (415) 392-4400. Discounted $15 single tickets are available for patrons under 35. Open Rehearsal tickets are $8 general admission and can be purchased through City Box Office.

Tickets for the December 12 Green Music Center concert are $35 to $85 and are available at



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Crowded Fire Theater 2014 Matchbox Readings Series Features New Plays by Geetha Reddy, Andrew Saito, MJ Kaufman, and Eugenie Chan

December 1-9
Thick House Theater
1695 18th Street, SF
Crowded Fire Theater  (CFT) announces the four featured playwrights and plays for the 2014 Matchbox Readings Series, public staged readings of plays in development. New plays by playwrights Geetha Reddy,  Andrew Saito, MJ Kaufman, and Eugenie Chan in readings from December 1-9,  2014 at the Thick House Theater.Crowded Fire champions playwrights whose work offers a vital contribution to the American theater landscape with a commitment to diversifying the canon of contemporary plays. “We believe art is always political,” says Crowded Fire Artistic Director Marissa Wolf, “and that in order to move toward a more just society, theaters must offer a wider range of aesthetics and voices on our stages.”  The Matchbox: Commissioning and Developing New Plays grew out of CFT’s need to bolster playwrights’ revision processes in order to strengthen the scripts before rehearsals for the professional productions began.
The plays featured in CFT’s 2014 Matchbox Readings Series are: (TBD) by Geetha Reddy (Dec. 1, 7pm); La Lechera by Andrew Saito (Dec. 2, 7pm); Murmur Rock by MJ Kaufman (Dec. 8, 7pm) and 19 Wentworth Alley by Eugenie Chan (Dec. 9, 7pm).
Award-winning playwright Christopher Chen, whose upcoming The Late Wedding and 2012 hit The Hundred Flowers Project were both commissioned and developed through The Matchbox remarks, ”By giving a still-emerging playwright a pathway to a full production, Crowded Fire facilitated a major turning point in my career. They steadfastly believed in my project and me as a writer through the entire process, making sure I had all the resources necessary to bring the play into fruition. To my mind, The Matchbox Commission’s emphasis on specifically working towards a full production clearly sets it apart from similar, less ambitious programs in comparably-sized theater companies.” The Hundred Flowers Project  was a co-commission with Playwrights Foundation as is A Wonderverse  by Geetha Reddy which will kick off this year’s Matchbox Reading Series. A Wonderverse is slated for the Crowded Fire mainstage in 2015.

New Plays by Geetha Reddy,  Andrew Saito, MJ Kaufman, and Eugenie Chan

Reading Dates: December 1-9  A Wonderverse by Geetha Reddy (Dec. 1, 7pm); La Lechera by Andrew Saito (Dec. 2, 7pm); Murmur Rock by MJ Kaufman (Dec. 8, 7pm) and 19 Wentworth Alley by Eugenie Chan (Dec. 9, 7pm).
At: Thick House, 1695 18th St., SF  (between Carolina St.& Arkansas St. in Potrero Hill )
Readings: 7 PM
Tickets: Free to the public RSVP at
Box Office by phone (415) 746-9238   Photos:

“We strive for a balance of styles, stories, and voices in our Matchbox series, this year the pieces are thrillingly original.They are quite different from one another, even down to the process/circumstances of their creation and their current stages of development. It’s a wild batch…”  Laura Bruckener, CFT’s Director of New Works.


December 1, 7pm
TBD  By Geetha Reddy
Working alone at night, a scientist makes an incredible discovery that challenges her beliefs and raises profound questions of right, ownership, responsibility, and power. A Wonderverse is a Crowded Fire Matchbox and Playwrights Foundation commissioned piece.
December 2, 7pm
La Lechera  By Andrew Saito
Directed by Marissa Wolf
This grotesque, aggressive satire by up-and-coming, stylistically daring writer Andrew Saito plunges us headlong into the horrifying greed, need, and exploitation that grease the crushing wheels of commerce.
December 8, 7pm
Murmur Rock  By MJ Kaufman
Directed by M. Graham Smith
A haunting play with the exposed bones of a dark fairy tale, Murmur Rock follows a Jewish American man and his mixed-race family traveling in Germany to find his father’s village. However, long-buried secrets, the shifting terrain of memory, and bargains unwittingly made lead them to places they never expected.
December 9, 7pm
19 Wentworth Alley  By Eugenie Chan
Directed by Marilee Talkington
Drawing on the true history of her grandfather, a leader in a Chinese crime syndicate in early 1900s San Francisco, Eugenie Chan layers original material with fragments of actual family documents to explore the world he knew – and made – one of lost hopes and grim choices.
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Charles Schwab Files Libel, Defamation Lawsuits against Beverly Hills Law Firm for Bogus Websites

Law Firm Steiner & Libo, Partner Leonard Steiner, Plaintiff Nicholas Behunin Sued by Charles Schwab Family For Libel

San Francisco-The Los Angeles law firm Steiner & Libo and one of its clients is being sued for defamation and libel for creating bogus websites as part of a plot to extract money from the family of respected investment advisor Charles R. Schwab, according to lawsuits filed today in Superior Court.

Legal complaints from Charles R. Schwab and his son Michael Schwab were filed against Steiner & Libo, partner Leonard Steiner, and plaintiff Nicholas Behunin of Los Angeles, Calif.

The lawsuits claims the law firm and its client knowingly made false claims on defamatory websites to purposely harm the reputation of the Schwab family in retaliation for not settling a lawsuit, which itself was an effort to shakedown the family.

The Charles R. Schwab lawsuit alleges the sites were “a tool for the extortion of Schwab” by creating the false impression that Mr. Schwab, his son, and family did business with a brutal dictator.

The defamatory sites state that Mr. Schwab sought to do business with the family of the late Indonesian dictator Suharto and his son Tommy Suharto, a convicted murderer. The sites advertise that Mr. Schwab can provide advice to investors on “how to profit from a brutal dictator” and methods to “launder money overseas.”

The Schwab lawsuits unequivocally state that neither Mr. Schwab nor his son Michael ever met President Suharto or Tommy Suharto or had any business dealings with them.

“The only reason to create these fraudulent websites was to besmirch the good name and reputation of Charles R. Schwab and his son Michael. Not one claim on the landing page of the site is true or correct and the guilty parties were aware of that prior to making the defamatory statements,” said attorney Robert R. Moore of the law firm of Allen Matkins, representing Charles R. Schwab.

The lawsuit claims “In sum, (Leonard) Steiner (Steiner & Libo and Nicholas Behunin) used the Websites as a tool for the extortion of Schwab.  The Website’s clear objective was, and is, to publicly embarrass and shame Schwab and then to leverage that public embarrassment into litigation advantage in Behunin’s lawsuit against Schwab.”

“The Defendants agreed to a scheme that included providing false and defamatory information to third parties who would post articles or blogs on the internet repeating the false and defamatory statements provided to them by Defendants…creating the impression that the false statements on the websites had been independently corroborated by the third-party posters,” according the lawsuit by Michael Schwab filed by his attorney David H. Schwartz.

Schwartz pointed to a false and defamatory story by blogger Bruce Fein entitled “Does This Schwab Charity Satisfy the IRS Perfume Test?<>” which is based on the libelous and defamatory statements from the bogus websites.

The Schwab’s attorneys said the bogus websites were posted after they refused to pay $25 million to Nicholas Behunin, who, through his attorney Leonard Steiner, threatened to sue unless the payment was made.   When no payment was made, Behunin sued the Schwabs on May 28, 2014, to recover his purported ownership interest in a real estate development venture with Michael Schwab. (The case is Sealutions LLC et al. case number BC546925, in the Superior Court of the State of California for the County of Los Angeles).

“The only purpose and intent of this scheme was to force a settlement through the implicit threat that Defendants would continue to disseminate such false and defamatory statements to the public unless and until Plaintiff and/or his father agreed to a settlement of the pending action,” according to the suit by Michael Schwab.

The Schwab legal filings claim that they initially contacted attorney Steiner in early October to inquire if he or his client was responsible for the websites. Steiner told them he had no knowledge of the sites, according the lawsuits.  The websites were registered anonymously. After further investigation, the Schwab’s attorneys found the sites were registered to Levick Strategic Communications public relations.  Later, after notifying attorney Steiner again, he still denied knowledge of them. After that contact with Steiner, the Schwab lawsuit says, the website was changed to include the name of Steiner & Libo law firm. In the past few days, the firm removed its name and now the site lists its owner as: N. Behunin.

Charles R. SchwabCharles R. Schwab

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Just Theater Presents the World Premiere IN FROM THE COLD

JUST THEATER (JT) presents the World Premiere of In From The Cold by Jonathan Spector, opening with a press night on Monday, November 3 (Previews Nov 1 & 2) running through November 23 in the Live Oak Theatre, 1301 Shattuck Ave (at Berryman) in North Berkeley, in which a Cold War spy’s past maybe isn’t past after all, the secret meaning of 80s movies is revealed, and its Ladies Night at Chilis. In From The Cold is a funny and provocative new play about what is means when you used to mean a lot, and now you don’t mean much anymore.

Following up on it’s hit production of A Maze, Just Theater brings this hilarious, troubling new work inspired by the little known true story of the Cold-War’s biggest spy. In From The Cold exposes the personal consequences of political actions and asks deep questions about the trade-offs we make in the name of our ideals. In From The Cold gives life to the actions of a former spy, playing out when a prodigal son returns home to take up residence in the basement with both funny and tragic results.

”A few years ago I discovered that one of the biggest spies from the Cold War had lived in hiding across the street from my suburban high school, and that I’d actually met him a few times. I’m always interested in people who are caught up in moments of great historical change, and in the incongruity of the large social forces and mundane everyday life – like the fact that this guy who may have prevented WWIII still had to worry about moving his car on Tuesdays for street sweeping.” remarks playwright and Just Theater Co-Artistic Director Jonathan Spector. In From The Cold is directed by Christine Young, featuring Seton Brown*, Julian Lopez-Morillas*, Harold Pierce, Sarah Moser*, David Sinaiko (*Actors Equity).

In From The Cold was a winner of Aurora Theater’s Global Age Prize, featured in Playwrights Foundation’s ROUGH reading series, and a finalist for the O’Neill Playwrights Conference. It was commissioned and developed in Just Theater’s New Play Lab.

Live Oak Theatre, Live Oak Park, 1301 Shattuck Ave,  (at Berryman) North Berkeley, CA 94709

Nov 1 – 23 (Previews Nov 1 & 2)

Performances: Thurs 7 pm Fri- Sat 8 pm Sunday 5 pm.

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Koret Foundation Criticized for Sexism in Lawsuit Against Susan Koret

Koret Foundation Should Apologize for Statements Against Immigrant and Domestic Workers

Partner of the San Francisco law firm Greene, Radovsky, Maloney, Share & Hennigh

Partner of the San Francisco law firm Greene, Radovsky, Maloney, Share & Hennigh


Anita Friedman, JFCS

Anita Friedman, JFCS


San Francisco—A diverse group of immigrant, domestic worker, labor and Jewish advocates demanded the Koret Foundation apologize for and withdraw negative comments directed against Susan Koret, the widow of Koret Foundation founder Joseph Koret, who sued for the Foundation for misdirecting and misusing monies from her husband’s fortune that were meant for the poor.

“The comments by the Koret Foundation and its spokesperson denigrate not only Ms. Koret, but they demean people of color, women, and those workers who tirelessly give their lives to improving the lives of others,” said Alysabeth Alexander.

At issue was a statement by official Koret Foundation spokesman Nathan Ballard who told the media, in response to Ms. Koret’s lawsuit, that “Susan was a housekeeper to Joe Koret and his first wife, Stephanie, and was only married to him for a brief period.” Mr. Ballard is also the spokesman for the Golden State Warriors NBA basketball team.

The group said Ballard’s “denigration of Susan Koret’s background as a housekeeper in an attempt to discredit her is both sexist and classist and should have no place in the public discourse in San Francisco. His statement and language is purposely designed to demean and denigrate women, immigrants, and domestic workers and is unacceptable under any circumstance.”

The group also wrote the Foundation in its letter, saying “While we cannot speak to Ms. Koret’s service on your Board of Directors, we can say that some of the Koret Foundation’s contributions to conservative, right-wing causes that were highlighted in recent news articles are anathema to those of us who work every day to lift up low-wage workers, immigrants, women, and communities of color.”

The letter was sent to the entire Koret Foundation board, including real estate investor Tad Taube; Richard L. Greene of Greene Radovsky Maloney Share & Hennigh; Anita Friedman, the executive director of director of Jewish Family and Children’s Services in San Francisco; Richard Atkinson, former president of the University of California; Michael J. Boskin, Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution; and Abraham D. Sofaer, Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution.

The Koret Board is expected to attend  the opening next week in Warsaw, Poland, of the Museum of the History of Polish Jews. There may be protests in Warsaw against the Koret Foundation because of  the alleged misdirection of Koret funds to the museum by Taube and the Koret Board and their alleged discrimination against Mrs. Koret.

The full text of the letter is below:


Open Letter to the Koret Foundation Board of Directors

October 17, 2014

It is with great concern we write to you regarding comments made by your spokesperson, Nathan Ballard, in the San Francisco Chronicle on October 8th about Susan Koret.

“Susan was a housekeeper to Joe Koret and his first wife, Stephanie, and was only married to him for a brief period. Susan is an incompetent director who lacks even a basic understanding of the foundation and its operations.”

Mr. Ballard’s denigration of Susan Koret’s background as a housekeeper in an attempt to discredit her is both sexist and classist and should have no place in the public discourse in San Francisco. His statement and language is purposely designed to demean and denigrate women, immigrants, and domestic workers and is unacceptable under any circumstance.

From reports, we understand that Susan Koret is an immigrant from Korea who began her career as a housekeeper. While we can’t speak to her personal experience or to the legal dispute at the Koret Foundation, we know that the contributions of millions of immigrant women–a great many of whom are domestic workers–should never be slighted.

Domestic workers care for our children, our parents, our elderly, and our communities. Many of us in San Francisco have fought to get the importance of domestic work recognized, so that the workers can enjoy many of the same right that the rest of us take for granted. With a significant legislative victory this year in Sacramento, now is not the time to go backwards.

We know that millions of immigrant women work tirelessly to improve the lives of their families and communities. This experience provides a critical perspective that is often-times missing when important decisions are made.

While we cannot speak to Ms. Koret’s service on your Board of Directors, we can say that some of the Koret Foundation’s contributions to conservative, right-wing causes that were highlighted in recent news articles are anathema to those of us who work every day to lift up low-wage workers, immigrants, women, and communities of color.

We demand that the Board of Directors and Nathan Ballard immediately apologize for and withdraw the negative comments directed against Ms. Koret that demean all people of color, women, and those workers who tirelessly give their lives to improving the lives of others.


National Domestic Worker Alliance

Alysabeth Alexander, Vice-President of Politics, SEIU Local 1021*

Juanita Flores, Co-Director, Mujeres Unidas y Activas

Katie Joaquin, Campaign Director, CA Domestic Workers Coalition

Hene Kelly, Jewish Labor Committee*

Andrea Lee, Co-Director, Mujeres Unidas y Activas

Shaw San Liu, Tenant and Workers Organizing Center, Chinese Progressive Association*

Kay Vasilyeva, Former Board Member, SF Women’s Political Committee*

*organization listed for identification purposes only — does not imply organizational endorsement

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Z Space presents two plays by renowned scientist and playwright Carl Djerassi

Ego, October 15 – November 9, 2014

Insufficiency, October 16 – November 7, 2014

Z Space is proud to present two plays by renowned chemist and playwright Carl Djerassi, October 15 – November 9, 2014 at Z Below. Dr. Djerassi is best known for the development of the birth control pill but in recent years he has turned to fiction and the theatre, with a series of novels and ten other plays, which have since been translated into 20 languages. His plays at Z Below coincide with his 90th birthday year and the publication of his latest autobiography, In Retrospect: From the Pill to the Pen.

Ego runs October 15 – November 7 and is directed by British director and producer Andy Jordan. Ego tells the story of a writer obsessed with his reputation to the point of faking his own death in order to find out what people really think of him. Featuring a psychiatrist sworn to silence, and a wife who’s on the trail of her husband’s alleged death, comedy and outrage converge in classic form. Bob Ernst, Lisa Anne Morrison and Jackson Davis star in this production.

Insufficiency, also directed by Jordan runs October 16 – November 7 and tells the story of a polish chemist named Jerzy Krzyz with an unusual specialty: Bubbleology. As a new arrival at a university’s chemistry department, he is determined to secure a senior post and is willing to do almost anything to get it, including producing some experimental and very lethal champagne, which he is only too willing to share with those standing in the way of his career ambitions. Insufficiency features actors Patrick Edwards, Rachel Harker, Lizzie Calogero, Dennis McIntyre and Timothy Redmond.

Dr. Djerassi, who celebrates his 90th birthday this year, is scheduled to attend all performances between October 17 and 25.


About Carl Djerassi

Carl Djerassi, emeritus professor of chemistry at Stanford University, is one of two American chemists to have been awarded both the National Medal of Science (for the first synthesis of a steroid oral contraceptive–”the Pill”) and the National Medal of Technology. A member of the US National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Royal Society (London) as well as the Leopoldina and many other foreign academies, Djerassi has received 34 honorary doctorates together with numerous other honors, such as the first Wolf Prize in Chemistry, the first Award for the Industrial Application of Science from the National Academy of Sciences, the Erasmus Medal of the Academia Europeae, the Perkin Medal of the Society for Chemical Industry, the American Chemical Society’s highest award, the Priestley Medal, the Austrian Cross of Honor for Science and Art,  the Great Merit Cross of Germany, and in 2011 the Edinburgh Medal. An Austrian postage stamp with his image was issued in 2005.

For the past quarter century, he has turned to fiction writing, mostly in the genre of “science-in-fiction,” whereby he illustrates, in the guise of realistic fiction, the human side of scientists and the personal conflicts faced by scientists in their quest for scientific knowledge, personal recognition, and financial rewards. In addition to a poetry collection (A Diary of Pique), a short story collection (“How I beat Coca-Cola and other Tales of One-upmanship”),  5 novels (“Cantor’s Dilemma;” “The Bourbaki Gambit;” “Marx, deceased;” “Menachem’s Seed;” and “NO”),  autobiography (“The Pill, Pygmy Chimps, and Degas’ Horse”  and in 2014 “In Retrospect: From the Pill to the Pen”) and memoir (“This Man’s Pill”), he has written 11 plays which have cumulatively been translated into 21 languages. His prose docudrama, “FOUR JEWS ON PARNASSUS-a Conversation” (dealing with Benjamin, Adorno, Scholem, and Schönberg), published in 2008 was followed in 2011 by the play, FOREPLAY, dealing with Hannah Arendt, Walter Benjamin, and Theodor and Gretel Adorno.

He is the founder of the Djerassi Resident Artists Program near Woodside, California, which provides residencies and studio space for artists in the visual arts, literature, choreography and performing arts, and music. Over 2300 artists have passed through that program since its inception in 1982.

Djerassi lives in San Francisco, Vienna, and London.


Tickets: $20-35, or by calling 866.811.4111

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Koret Foundation Sued by Widow Who Claims Board Members Uses Charity as “Personal Piggy Bank”

Jewish  Family and Children's Services

Anita Friedman Jewish Family and Children’s Services

President of Koret Foundation

Tad Taube, President of Koret Foundation

Partner of the San Francisco law firm Greene, Radovsky, Maloney, Share & Hennigh

Richard L. Greene, Partner of the San Francisco law firm Greene, Radovsky, Maloney, Share & Hennigh

Board Member and Silicon Valley Real Estate Investor Tad Taube, San Francisco Attorney Richard L. Greene, JFCS Director Anita Friedman, Other Board Members Shun the Poor, Bay Area, Jewish Causes—in Favor of Spending Foundation Resources on Conservative and Pet Projects at Half-Billion Dollar Charity


San Francisco—The Jewish community from San Francisco to Poland was rocked this week when the widow of Koret Foundation founder Joseph Koret filed a lawsuit against the Koret Foundation and its Board of Directors for conflicts of interest and self-dealing.  The lawsuit says the Koret Board is illegally funding pet projects that include right-wing conservative causes in the United States to wrongly spending $10 million to the Museum of the History of Polish Jews.

The lawsuit said the wrongdoing is being orchestrated by Koret Foundation President Tad Taube, a native of Poland and well-known right wing conservative Republican.  The suit also lays blame on Taube’s personal attorney and Board member Richard L. Greene of Greene Radovsky Maloney Share & Hennigh LLP and Anita Friedman, the executive director of director of Jewish Family and Children’s Services in San Francisco as well as board member Richard Atkinson, former president of the University of California; board member Michael J. Boskin, Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution; and board member Abraham D. Sofaer, Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution.

The suit filed October 7, 2014 in San Francisco Superior Court by Mrs. Koret alleges that under Taube’s direction the board has ignored the priorities established by her late husband to help the poor and assist Jewish causes in the Bay Area and Israel.

Instead, her suit claims, the Koret board is using foundation funds to promote programs closely affiliated with individual board members and is purposely confusing the public by putting signage that prominently features Taube’s name alongside the Koret Foundation name on buildings and grants for which the Koret Foundation is the principal funder.

“Defendants’ duty of loyalty to the Foundation has been corrupted by these directors’ close affiliations with many of the Foundation’s recent grants, resulting in tens of millions of dollars distributed due to self-interest,” according to the lawsuit.

The suit demands the removal of the Koret board members and calls for their replacement with the appointment of an independent board with a majority of Jewish directors.

“Taube says publicly that giving to the poor is “a bottomless pit.” Instead he has led the Koret Foundation by focusing its giving to organizations identified with him, creating a corporate culture of directors who rubber stamp his decisions as long as their favored organizations are also supported.  “In elevating their own and affiliated interests while ostensibly making decisions for the Koret Foundation, defendants are breaching duties of loyalty that require them to serve faithfully the interests of the Koret Foundation” the lawsuit claims.

“Alleviating suffering and misfortune were my husband’s top priorities,” said Mrs. Koret. “Joe and Stephanie’s money shouldn’t be used for Tad Taube’s pet projects in Poland or to help conservative economic and policy think tanks–not when so many in the Bay Area go to bed hungry every night and Jewish causes need support.”

Supporting her lawsuit is Joe and Stephanie Koret’s closest surviving family member, nephew Merv Brown of Walnut Creek, who worked with the Korets for decades.  He said about the suit:

“With all respect to Mr. Taube, if he wants to spend money on Poland, he should use his own money–not my uncle’s and my aunt’s–to assist his homeland. I am proud to stand with Susan Koret to support and endorse the directions and wishes of my family that their fortune be spent as Uncle Joe wished: to help the poor and Jews in Israel and the Bay Area.”

The San Jose Mercury News reported that: “Mrs. Koret is doing a favor for the entire Bay Area community with her lawsuit,” said longtime friend Julie Goodman. “She has a lot of courage. No one else has had the guts to take on Mr. Taube, who has used his power, plus his and the Koret Foundation’s money, to bully a lot of people and organizations into subservience.”

Mrs. Koret’s lawsuit alleges that others, including “philanthropic civic leaders and former and current staff members will support Mrs. Koret in her efforts to restore the Koret Foundation’s purpose and dignity free of the control of Mr. Taube.”

The lawsuit claims that, at Taube’s direction, the Koret Foundation has donated approximately $9 million to the Museum of the History of Polish Jews in Warsaw, a pet project of Taube, who was born in Poland.  “

While the Polish Museum commemorates significant Jewish history, the diversion of Koret funds to Poland is not in keeping with my husband’s charitable mission…and in effect drains funds that could benefit the needy in communities in the Bay Area and Israel,” the lawsuit states.

Sam Singer of Singer Associates, Inc., who is acting as a spokesman for Mrs. Koret in the lawsuit, said the lawsuit will attempt to claw back the $9 million in money from Taube that was given to the Museum of the History of Polish Jews and return it to the Koret Foundation. The Museum of the History of Polish Jews is scheduled to open Oct. 28 in Warsaw. The Museum is reported facing financial difficulties, according to Polish media reports.

Mrs. Koret noted her husband was a native of Odessa, Russia, who immigrated to America, struggled growing up poor in the U.S., and then struck it rich later in life in clothing and real estate. He was deeply committed to humanitarian causes such as alleviating hunger,  and would “be deeply angered and offended by Tad Taube and the board’s strong support of conservative  causes and grants that divert money needed for the local community and Jewish causes.”

The lawsuit asks the court to prevent the spending down of the Foundation’s assets by Taube and the board members with whom he has surrounded himself and allow the appointment of a new, independent board to carry out its mission and save the Foundation.

Mrs. Koret was named a lifetime director and chairwoman of the Foundation prior to her husband’s death in 1982. She was entrusted by her late husband to carry out the family legacy of caring for the poor and supporting Jewish and community causes through the Koret Foundation, according to the lawsuit.

The lawsuit also recites that the board has rejected a series of Asian and African-American candidates for board membership, including their rejection last month of former Mayor Willie Brown as president of the Foundation.

Mrs. Koret said she has been marginalized as Taube, a Silicon Valley real estate investor, and his hand-picked supporters on the board steer donations toward causes in which they have affiliations.

Mrs. Koret said she filed the suit as a last resort after her efforts to diversify the board, get independent legal advice, confirm the perpetual nature of the Foundation and redirect funds back to her late husband’s mission were rebuffed.  She fears the Koret Foundation is facing destruction of its mission and eventual collapse unless changes are made.

She said in the last 12 months, Taube has undertaken three major real estate transactions:  the sale of the Foundation’s largest real estate asset; marketing of another Foundation property; and refinancing a significant loan on a third Foundation property. The collective value of the real estate involved in these transactions is several hundred million dollars, according to the lawsuit.

“Over Mrs. Koret’s objections, defendants approved engaging a broker associated with defendant Taube’s real estate businesses to sell, market and refinance the Foundation’s properties and split its commission with Taube Investments, without disclosing the percentage commission split.  This conduct violates state and federal law and is breach of fiduciary duty,” the lawsuit states.

The Foundation’s general counsel and Taube attorney Richard L. Greene, over Mrs. Koret’s objection, failed to advise that an independent appraisal or broker was needed to market the Foundation property and refinance the loan, even though the same broker associated with Taube’s businesses was engaged for both these real estate transactions, according to the suit.

“Greene’s conduct … may expose the Foundation to claims of self-dealing, is contrary to California professional rules for attorneys in avoiding conflicts of interest, and causes economic injury to the Foundation,” the lawsuit states.

The lawsuit alleges that Taube is a shameless self-promoter who has personally selected board members to rubber stamp his decisions in exchange for support of their own pet projects. Additionally, the suit says Taube established his own foundation, called Taube Philanthropies, but uses money and staff from the Koret Foundation to pay for and enhance joint projects of Taube Philanthropies and the Koret Foundation.   A review of the Koret Foundation’s public filings shows reported annual salaries and compensation of officers exceeded $1.9 million in 2011, while Taube Philanthropies showed no such expenses for the same period, according to the lawsuit.

Mrs. Koret’s lawsuit charges that out of the $64 million gifted by the Koret Foundation between 2010 and 2012, nearly 60 percent was spent on causes outside the stated mission of her husband, the late Joseph Koret.

The lawsuit claims conflicts of interest, self-dealing, and breaches of duty abound on the board:

  • The Koret Foundation’s Executive Director Jeffrey Farber provides no independent management, reaps a large salary and perks at the Foundation, has little involvement in grant-making and does only what Taube asks him to do.  Farber is also a member of the Taube Philanthropies board, creating a serious conflict of loyalty and duty.   His wife works for Koret Board member Anita Friedman at Jewish Family and Children’s Services, yet another conflict.

Koret Board Member Anita Friedman, director of Jewish Family and Children’s Services, JFCS, sits on the Taube Philanthropies board as a director. Friedman makes up to $380,000 per year as executive director of JFCS, which is a major recipient of Koret funds. During September’s Koret Foundation meeting, she oversaw and participated in a vote granting $1.2 million to the Shalom Hartman Institute, where she also sits on the board.

While JFCS and Shalom Hartman are worthwhile causes, Friedman has failed to recuse herself in any discussions of massive grants to entities where she is on the board or employed. Friedman sees no conflict in directing millions in additional funds to entities where she has other interests and has no inclination to resign her JFCS position. Friedman has voted against every initiative by Mrs. Koret over the past two years seeking to bring independence, balance and transparency to the Koret board.

  • Michael J. Boskin is a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, which has received millions from the Koret Foundation over the years. Earlier this month, the board approved another $280,000 grant to the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research where Boskin is also a Senior Fellow and former director. Since 1992, Koret has approved grants totaling $4.5 million to support SIEPR, and millions to Hoover through Stanford.


  • Abraham Sofaer is another interlocking director on the board of Taube Philanthropies, and is also a Senior Fellow Emeritus at the Hoover Institution, based at Stanford University.  From 2010-2012, the Koret Foundation’s funding to Hoover and Stanford of nearly $4 million was about equal to its total support of all social welfare causes in the Bay Area combined.


In the lawsuit, Taube, a member of the Board of Overseers and the Executive Committee of the Hoover Institution, is alleged to have misused Foundation money to pay consultants to write editorials opposing Obama administration policies and to attend trips in support of Hoover.

The lawsuit also alleges that Taube:

  • Reduced funds targeted for Koret Foundation grantees and increased funds to organizations that are his personal favorites.


  • Used Koret funds to pay millions of dollars to entities affiliated with him or his close associates to manage the Foundation’s real estate holdings.


  • Without board approval, commissioned and installed a life-size mural depicting himself and now hung inside the Koret Foundation’s new headquarters in San Francisco at a cost to the Foundation of $80,000.


  • Paid more than $75,000 in Foundation money for promotional materials about himself, including booklets and newspaper advertisements.


  • Subsidized the operating costs of Taube Philanthropies by using Koret staff and resources for joint grant projects, and used Koret Foundation resources for travel, marketing and personal expenses.


  • Terminated a $35,000 contract of an independent publisher of a book about the life of Joseph and Stephanie Koret, the founder’s first wife. Taube was reportedly angry that the book was not about him or his contributions.


  • Along with counsel and board member Richard L. Greene, discriminated against and ridiculed Mrs. Koret and prevented her from speaking with Foundation staff.

Mrs. Koret in her lawsuit pledges to maintain the priorities of her husband by broadening the Koret board to include community leaders while maintaining a majority of Jewish directors.  She is committed to maintaining support for the anchor institutions in the Bay Area that Koret has supported over many years and to prevent any continued diversion of funds to out of mission organization and countries.


Jewish  Family and Children's Services

SUED: Anita Friedman, Jewish Family and Children’s Services

Partner of the San Francisco law firm Greene, Radovsky, Maloney, Share & Hennigh

SUED: Richard L. Greene, Partner of the San Francisco law firm Greene, Radovsky, Maloney, Share & Hennigh

President of Koret Foundation

SUED: Tad Taube, President of Koret Foundation


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42nd Street Moon kicks off its 22nd season with the rarely seen Richard Rodgers-Stephen Sondheim-Arthur Laurents collaboration DO I HEAR A WALTZ?, starring Broadway’s Tony nominee Emily Skinner (Side Show, The Full Monty, Billy Elliot). Based on Arthur Laurents’ 1952 play The Time of the Cuckoo, which inspired the Katharine Hepburn movie Summertime, the wistful story follows a lonely American tourist as she finds romance under the enchantment of mid-1960s Venice. DO I HEAR A WALTZ? plays October 1 – October 19 (press opening October 4) at The Eureka Theatre, 215 Jackson St., San Francisco.  For tickets ($25-$75) and information the public may call (415) 255-8207 or

DO I HEAR A WALTZ? opened on Broadway on March 18, 1965 at the 46th Street Theatre with a cast featuring Sergio Franchi and Elizabeth Allen in the lead roles, and received three Tony Award nominations including Best Original Score. The luminous Rodgers-Sondheim score includes Do I Hear a Waltz?Someone Like YouTake the MomentMoon in My Window and What Do We Do? We Fly! It has never received a major Broadway revival. 

Emily Skinner, who will star as the lonely American tourist “Leona,” last appeared on Broadway starring in the acclaimed musical Billy Elliot. Handpicked by Oscar-winning director Stephen Daldry, she had the honor of being the very first American selected to play the role of Billy’s dance teacher, Mrs. Wilkinson. Ms. Skinner was nominated for a Tony Award (with Alice Ripley) and received a Drama League Award for her performance as Daisy Hilton in the brilliant but short-lived Side Show.  Her other original Broadway cast credits include Jekyll & HydeJames Joyce’s The Dead, The Full MontyDinner at Eight, as well as The Actors Fund productions of The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas and Dreamgirls. Off-Broadway, Ms. Skinner performed in the acclaimed City Center Encores revivals of No StringsPardon My EnglishA Tree Grows in Brooklyn, and Fiorello! She has also performed in various productions and workshops at Manhattan Theatre Club, WPA Theatre, Paramount Theater at Madison Square Gardens, York Theatre, Playwrights Horizons, and the Roundabout Theatre.

Co-starring as the Italian who sweeps Leona off her feet is Tyler McKenna, who returns to 42nd Street Moon where he was seen in The Best of Times:The Jerry Herman Salon, and Oh, Kay! He will be back later this fall as Rocky Fulton in Moon’s upcoming production of Something for the Boys. Recent credits include Annie Get Your Gun with Napa Valley Conservatory Theater and A Little Princess at Berkeley Playhouse. Other work includes productions with Symmetry Theatre Company, The Mountain Play, Marin Shakespeare Company, and American Conservatory Theater. Mr. McKenna is a graduate of the American Conservatory Theater’s MFA program.

The cast of DO I HEAR A WALTZ? will also feature Taylor BartolucciJonah BroscowNikita BurshteynLucinda Hitchcock ConeDavid Naughton,Stephanie Rhoads, Michael Rhone, and Abby Sammons. Musical direction is by Dave Dobrusky, set design by Hector Zavala, costume design by Felicia Lilienthal, and lighting design by Danny Maher.

This production of DO I HEAR A WALTZ? will be helmed by 42nd Street Moon Artistic Director Greg MacKellan. Mr. MacKellan’s career in musical theatre extends back more than 30 years. His producing cre­dits in New York and Los Angeles include The Baker’s Wife, a musical on which he worked ex­tensively with Stephen Schwartz and Joseph Stein. In addition to his work on dozens of 42nd Street Moon productions, Mr. MacKellan has served as director and writer in more than 15 revues for various Bay Area groups.

For 21 years, 42nd Street Moon has celebrated and preserved the art and spirit of the American Musical Theatre.  To contribute to the evolution and continuing vitality of the art form, 42nd Street Moon presents intimately produced performances of classic and rarely performed musical works. Through its productions, educational programs, and community outreach, 42nd Street Moon is committed to increasing the awareness and appreciation of the rich heritage and cultural perspective of the musical theatre and its vast influence on the world stage.

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American Wonder: Folk Art at BAM/PFA

Portrait of a Boy in GreenThe University of California, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAM/PFA) presents American Wonder: Folk Art from the Collection, on view October 1 through December 21, 2014. Featuring approximately fifty portraits, landscapes, weather vanes, decorative sculptures, and other works dating from the wake of the Declaration of Independence War to the end of the Civil War, this exhibition captures glimpses of young America during a period of boundless optimism, massive growth, and eventual upheaval. This distinguished collection at BAM/PFA—one of the most impressive American folk art collections from this period anywhere—results from the generosity of two collectors and patrons, Bliss Carnochan and Nancy Edebo. American Wonder is the last major art exhibition to open in BAM/PFA’s current museum building at 2626 Bancroft Way before the institution moves to a new location, currently under construction, in downtown Berkeley in early 2016.

American Wonder starts in late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century New England, where the country’s newly independent citizens were beginning to help define and assume a national identity—one aligned with the goals of liberty, self-improvement, and advancement. Itinerant artists and skilled craftsman created art that captures this formative moment in American history. In the immediate years following independence, painted portraits were in high demand, to identify individuals, establish family legacy, and to boast personal and/or civic achievement. Artists from this period often traveled from one town to another, following signals of new prosperity and growth. Enterprising artists placed ads in local newspapers, emphasizing their skills in creating true likenesses of their sitters.

One such artist was the deaf painter John Brewster, Jr. who travelled and worked in coastal centers and rural towns from Maine to New York. Brewster is known to have painted a number of portraits in and around Salem, Massachusetts, an important shipping, commercial, and artistic center. Brewster’s Boy in Green (c. 1805–1810) is thought to be a portrait of Samuel Field McIntire, who grew up to become a furniture maker and architectural carver in Salem. His father, Samuel McIntire, referred to as “the architect of Salem,” designed some of the most important Federal style buildings in the region. In Boy in Green young McIntire is dressed in a smartly styled green suit. With book in hand, he stands stiffly on a rose-and-gold, geometrically patterned floor (the vibrant floor covering attesting to the fashionable taste and means of the McIntires). Brewster’s greatest attention is to the boy’s facial features, characteristics that would identify him to his contemporaries as Samuel Field McIntire, poised to move into adulthood and professional life.

American Wonder also includes a number of landscapes, ranging from pastoral scenes to views of industrial progress. Like McIntire’s Salem, Providence, Rhode Island, grew out of early maritime trade. View of Providence, Rhode Island, created in the 1820s by an unidentified artist, functions as a portrait of the harbor city, on the brink of transition from a fishing village to a bustling center of commerce. Narrated by means of architecture rather than people and activities, this compact panorama of structures along South Water Street unfolds from old to new as Providence shifted from sea trade to manufacturing industries.

With remarkable beauty and formal simplicity, the works of art in American Wonder vividly captures a burgeoning nation during a time of enormous change.

A handful of public programs will provide useful context to American Wonder. Richard W. Lyman Professor of Humanities, Emeritus at Stanford University, Bliss Carnochan, who collected all of the works on view in this exhibition, will discuss specific works and his interest in collecting folk art on October 5. On November 23 art historian Margaretta Lovell and social historian David Henkin will provide insights about pre-Civil War American society and culture. Guided tours will be offered on Thursdays and Sunday afternoons (excluding November 16 and December 21). Patricia Lessard will lead an American Sign Language tour of the exhibition on November 15. Cell phone audio tours are also available.

Public Programs:
Gallery Talk: Bliss Carnochan
October 5, 2014; 3 p.m.
Bliss Carnochan, who collected the works on view in American Wonder with Nancy Edebo between 1966 and 1975, shares his passion for and knowledge of American folk art in this informal gallery talk. Carnochan, Richard W. Lyman Professor of Humanities, Emeritus at Stanford University, will discuss selected portraits, landscapes, sculptures, and commemorative mourning pictures, and address the complex status of folk art per se and as a field for collecting.
Included with gallery admission.

American Sign Language Guided Tour
Saturday, November 15, 2014; 1:30 p.m.
Join the engaging and expert American Sign Language interpreter Patricia Lessard for a student-led guided tour of American Wonder.
Included with gallery admission.

Imagining Everyday Life in the Young US: Margaretta Lovell and David Henkin in Conversation
Sunday, November 23, 2014; 3 p.m.
Art historian Margaretta Lovell and social historian David Henkin, both professors at UC Berkeley, offer a rich context for the artwork on view in American Wonder. They will discuss pre-Civil War American society and culture, touching on such issues as individual and community identity, rituals of mourning, schoolgirl skills, professional penmanship, and the role of domestic animals.
Included with gallery admission.

Guided Tours
Thursdays at 12:15 & Sundays at 2
Meet in the Bancroft lobby for guided tours of American Wonder led by UC Berkeley graduate students in art history and history. No reservations required. No tours November 16 or December 21: see the online calendar for the schedule at Included with gallery admission.

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